Results for 'Deborah Ekusai Sebatta'

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  1.  3
    “You Would Not Be in a Hurry to Go Back Home”: Patients’ Willingness to Participate in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials at a Clinical and Research Facility in Kampala, Uganda.Deborah Ekusai Sebatta, Godfrey Siu, Henry W. Nabeta, Godwin Anguzu, Stephen Walimbwa, Mohammed Lamorde, Badru Bukenya & Andrew Kambugu - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundFew studies have examined factors associated with willingness of people living with HIV to participate in HIV treatment clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the factors associated with participation of PLHIV in HIV treatment clinical trials research at a large urban clinical and research facility in Uganda.MethodsA mixed methods study was conducted at the Infectious Diseases Institute, adult HIV clinic between July 2016 and January 2017. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, focused group discussions with respondents categorised as either (...)
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  2.  3
    Researchers’ Perspectives on Return of Individual Genetics Results to Research Participants: A Qualitative Study.Erisa Sabakaki Mwaka, Deborah Ekusai Sebatta, Joseph Ochieng, Ian Guyton Munabi, Godfrey Bagenda, Deborah Ainembabazi & David Kaawa-Mafigiri - 2021 - Global Bioethics 32 (1):15-33.
    Genetic results are usually not returned to research participants in Uganda despite their increased demand. We report on researchers’ perceptions and experiences of return of individual genetic research results. The study involved 15 in-depth interviews of investigators involved in genetics and/or genomic research. A thematic approach was used to interpret the results. The four themes that emerged from the data were the need for return of individual results including incidental findings, community engagement and the consenting process, implications and challenges to (...)
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  3.  77
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language and Meaning.Deborah K. W. Modrak - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about Aristotle's philosophy of language, interpreted in a framework that provides a comprehensive interpretation of Aristotle's metaphysics, philosophy of mind, epistemology and science. The aim of the book is to explicate the description of meaning contained in De Interpretatione and to show the relevance of that theory of meaning to much of the rest of Aristotle's philosophy. In the process Deborah Modrak reveals how that theory of meaning has been much maligned. This is a major (...)
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  4.  85
    Aristotle: The Power of Perception.DEBORAH K. W. MODRAK - 1987 - University of Chicago Press.
  5.  91
    Error and Inference: Recent Exchanges on Experimental Reasoning, Reliability, and the Objectivity and Rationality of Science.Deborah G. Mayo & Aris Spanos (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although both philosophers and scientists are interested in how to obtain reliable knowledge in the face of error, there is a gap between their perspectives that has been an obstacle to progress. By means of a series of exchanges between the editors and leaders from the philosophy of science, statistics and economics, this volume offers a cumulative introduction connecting problems of traditional philosophy of science to problems of inference in statistical and empirical modelling practice. Philosophers of science and scientific practitioners (...)
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  6.  25
    A Grasshopperian Analysis Of The Strategic Foul.Deborah P. Vossen - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):325-346.
    The question of acceptability in respect to the strategic foul in sport has provoked a rich and seemingly irreconcilable dispute with normative theorists currently divided amongst three schools of thought including formalism, conventionalism and interpretivism. In this paper, I seek to transcend the three-way intellectual stalemate portrayed in the literature via a consideration as to whether or not the strategic foul qualifies as ‘Utopian’. More specifically, after demonstrating that Bernard Suits’ theory of game-playing is fully capable of embracing all three (...)
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  7.  37
    Rationality and Feminist Philosophy.Deborah K. Heikes - 2010 - Continuum.
    Exploring the history of the concept of 'rationality', Deborah K. Hakes argues that feminism should seek to develop a virtue theory of rationality.
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  8.  3
    Theodor Adorno: Key Concepts.Deborah Cook (ed.) - 2008 - Acumen Publishing.
    Adorno continues to have an impact on disciplines as diverse as philosophy, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, musicology and literary theory. An uncompromising critic, even as Adorno contests many of the premises of the philosophical tradition, he also reinvigorates that tradition in his concerted attempt to stem or to reverse potentially catastrophic tendencies in the West. This book serves as a guide through the intricate labyrinth of Adorno's work. Expert contributors make Adorno accessible to a new generation of readers without simplifying (...)
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  9. Groups as Agents.Deborah Tollefsen - 2015 - Polity.
    In the social sciences and in everyday speech we often talk about groups as if they behaved in the same way as individuals, thinking and acting as a singular being. We say for example that "Google intends to develop an automated car", "the U.S. Government believes that Syria has used chemical weapons on its people", or that "the NRA wants to protect the rights of gun owners". We also often ascribe legal and moral responsibility to groups. But could groups literally (...)
     
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  10.  28
    In Other Words: Variation in Reference and Narrative.Deborah Schiffrin - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Deborah Schiffrin looks at two important tasks of language--presenting 'who' we are talking about (the referent) and 'what happened' to them (their actions and attributes) in a narrative--and explores how this presentation alters in relation to emergent forms and meanings. Drawing on examples from both face-to-face talk and public discourse, she analyzes a variety of repairs, reformulations of referents, and retellings of narratives, ranging from word-level repairs within a single turn-at-talk, to life story narratives told years apart.
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  11. Hobbes.Deborah Baumgold - 2003 - In David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.), Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford University Press. pp. 163--180.
     
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  12. Review of Deborah Achtenberg's Cognition of Value in Aristotle's Ethics: Promise of Enrichment, Threat of Destruction. [REVIEW]Deborah Achtenberg - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):465-468.
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  13. Sixty Years on Deborah Evans.Deborah Evans - 2009 - In B. P. O'Donohoe & R. O. Elveton (eds.), Sartre's Second Century. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 73.
     
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  14. Samuel Hellman and Deborah S. Hellman.Deborah S. Hellman - 1994 - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics 324:163.
     
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  15.  30
    Ethics in Practice: Lawyers' Roles, Responsibilities, and Regulation.Deborah L. Rhode (ed.) - 2003 - Oup Usa.
    This collection cuts across conventional disciplinary boundaries to address the roles, responsibilities, and regulation of contemporary lawyers. Contributors address common concerns from diverse perspectives, including philosophy, psychology, economics, political science, and organisational behaviour. Topics include the nature of professions, the structure of practice, the constraints of an adversarial system, the attorney-client relationship, the practical value of moral theory, the role of race and gender, and the public service responsibilities of lawyers and law students.
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  16. Cognitive Architecture: From Bio-politics to Noo-politics ; Architecture & Mind in the Age of Communication and Information.Deborah Hauptmann & Warren Neidich (eds.) - 2010 - 010 Publishers.
    "Cognitive Architecture" asks how evolving modalities--from bio-politics to "noo-politics"--can be mapped upon the city under contemporary conditions of urbanization and globalization. Noo-politics, most broadly understood as the power exerted over the life of the mind, reconfigures perception, memory and attention, and also implicates potential ways and means by which neurobiological architecture is undergoing reconfiguration. This volume, motivated by theories such as 'cognitive capitalism' and concepts such as 'neural plasticity, ' shows how architecture and urban processes and products commingle to form (...)
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  17.  52
    Error and the Growth of Experimental Knowledge.Deborah Mayo - 1996 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):455-459.
  18.  12
    The Joint Effects of Justice Climate, Group Moral Identity, and Corporate Social Responsibility on the Prosocial and Deviant Behaviors of Groups.Meghan A. Thornton & Deborah E. Rupp - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (4):677-697.
    Pulling from theories of social exchange, deonance, and fairness heuristics, this study focuses on the relationship between overall justice climate and both the prosocial and deviant behaviors of groups. Specifically, it considers two contextual boundary conditions on this effect—corporate social responsibility and group moral identity. Results from a laboratory experiment are presented, which show a significant effect for overall justice climate and a two-way interaction between overall justice climate and CSR on group-level prosocial and deviant behaviors, and a marginally significant (...)
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  19.  2
    Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment.Deborah Orr (ed.) - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    InBelief, Bodies, and Being, thirteen distinguished contributors present diverse and illuminating viewpoints on feminist issues of embodiement, materialism, and agency from feminist and postmodernist philosophical perspectives.
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  20.  79
    Descartes and the Passionate Mind.Deborah J. Brown - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Descartes is often accused of having fragmented the human being into two independent substances, mind and body, with no clear strategy for explaining the apparent unity of human experience. Deborah Brown argues that, contrary to this view, Descartes did in fact have a conception of a single, integrated human being, and that in his view this conception is crucial to the success of human beings as rational and moral agents and as practitioners of science. The passions are pivotal in (...)
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  21. Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, Second Edition by Deborah G. Johnson.Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  22.  62
    Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994).Deborah G. Johnson - 1993 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  23.  52
    The Human Function Compunction: Teleological Explanation in Adults.Deborah Kelemen & Evelyn Rosset - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):138-143.
    Research has found that children possess a broad bias in favor of teleological - or purpose-based - explanations of natural phenomena. The current two experiments explored whether adults implicitly possess a similar bias. In Study 1, undergraduates judged a series of statements as "good" or "bad" explanations for why different phenomena occur. Judgments occurred in one of three conditions: fast speeded, moderately speeded, or unspeeded. Participants in speeded conditions judged significantly more scientifically unwarranted teleological explanations as correct, but were not (...)
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  24. Naturalizing Joint Action: A Process-Based Approach.Deborah Tollefsen & Rick Dale - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (3):385-407.
    Numerous philosophical theories of joint agency and its intentional structure have been developed in the past few decades. These theories have offered accounts of joint agency that appeal to higher-level states that are?shared? in some way. These accounts have enhanced our understanding of joint agency, yet there are a number of lower-level cognitive phenomena involved in joint action that philosophers rarely acknowledge. In particular, empirical research in cognitive science has revealed that when individuals engage in a joint activity such as (...)
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  25.  11
    Professional Physical Scientists Display Tenacious Teleological Tendencies: Purpose-Based Reasoning as a Cognitive Default.Deborah Kelemen, Joshua Rottman & Rebecca Seston - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1074-1083.
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  26. From Extended Mind to Collective Mind.Deborah Tollefsen - 2006 - Cognitive Systems Research 7 (2):140-150.
  27. Severe Testing as a Basic Concept in a Neyman–Pearson Philosophy of Induction.Deborah G. Mayo & Aris Spanos - 2006 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (2):323-357.
    Despite the widespread use of key concepts of the Neyman–Pearson (N–P) statistical paradigm—type I and II errors, significance levels, power, confidence levels—they have been the subject of philosophical controversy and debate for over 60 years. Both current and long-standing problems of N–P tests stem from unclarity and confusion, even among N–P adherents, as to how a test's (pre-data) error probabilities are to be used for (post-data) inductive inference as opposed to inductive behavior. We argue that the relevance of error probabilities (...)
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  28.  35
    The Scope of Teleological Thinking in Preschool Children.Deborah Kelemen - 1999 - Cognition 70 (3):241-272.
  29. Adorno on Nature.Deborah Cook - 2011 - Routledge.
    Decades before the environmental movement emerged in the 1960s, Adorno condemned our destructive and self-destructive relationship to the natural world, warning of the catastrophe that may result if we continue to treat nature as an object that exists exclusively for our own benefit. "Adorno on Nature" presents the first detailed examination of the pivotal role of the idea of natural history in Adorno's work. A comparison of Adorno's concerns with those of key ecological theorists - social ecologist Murray Bookchin, ecofeminist (...)
     
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  30.  98
    Computer Systems: Moral Entities but Not Moral Agents. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):195-204.
    After discussing the distinction between artifacts and natural entities, and the distinction between artifacts and technology, the conditions of the traditional account of moral agency are identified. While computer system behavior meets four of the five conditions, it does not and cannot meet a key condition. Computer systems do not have mental states, and even if they could be construed as having mental states, they do not have intendings to act, which arise from an agent’s freedom. On the other hand, (...)
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  31. Organizations as True Believers.Deborah Tollefsen - 2002 - Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):395–410.
  32. Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
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  33.  63
    Quid Quidditism Est?Deborah Smith - 2016 - Erkenntnis 81 (2):237-257.
    Over the last decade or so, there has been a renewed interest in a view about properties known as quidditism. However, a review of the literature reveals that ‘quidditism’ is used to cover a range of distinct views. In this paper I explore the logical space of distinct types of quidditism. The first distinction noted is between quidditism as a thesis explicitly about property individuation and quidditism as a principle of unrestricted property recombination. The distinction recently drawn by Dustin Locke (...)
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  34. Collective Intentionality and the Social Sciences.Deborah Perron Tollefsen - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):25-50.
    In everyday discourse and in the context of social scientific research we often attribute intentional states to groups. Contemporary approaches to group intentionality have either dismissed these attributions as metaphorical or provided an analysis of our attributions in terms of the intentional states of individuals in the group.Insection1, the author argues that these approaches are problematic. In sections 2 and 3, the author defends the view that certain groups are literally intentional agents. In section 4, the author argues that there (...)
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  35.  73
    Function, Goals and Intention: Children’s Teleological Reasoning About Objects.Deborah Kelemen - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (12):461-468.
  36.  50
    Learning From the Literature on Collegiate Cheating: A Review of Empirical Research. [REVIEW]Deborah Crown & M. Spiller - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (6):229-246.
    The role demographic, personality, and situational factors play in the ethical decision making process has received a significant amount of attention (Ford and Richardson, 1994). However, the empirical research on students' decisions to engage in collegiate cheating has not been included in this literature. This paper reviews the last 25 years of empirical research on collegiate cheating. The individual/situational factor typology from Ford and Richardson's review (1994) is used to compare the two literatures. In addition, issues pertaining to the quantification (...)
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  37.  45
    The Ethics of Autism: Among Them, but Not of Them.Deborah R. Barnbaum - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Autism is one of the most compelling, controversial, and heartbreaking cognitive disorders. It presents unique philosophical challenges as well, raising intriguing questions in philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and philosophy of language that need to be explored if the autistic population is to be responsibly served. Starting from the "theory of mind" thesis that a fundamental deficit in autism is the inability to recognize that other persons have minds, Deborah R. Barnbaum considers its implications for the nature of consciousness, (...)
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  38.  84
    Alignment, Transactive Memory, and Collective Cognitive Systems.Deborah P. Tollefsen, Rick Dale & Alexandra Paxton - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):49-64.
    Research on linguistic interaction suggests that two or more individuals can sometimes form adaptive and cohesive systems. We describe an “alignment system” as a loosely interconnected set of cognitive processes that facilitate social interactions. As a dynamic, multi-component system, it is responsive to higher-level cognitive states such as shared beliefs and intentions (those involving collective intentionality) but can also give rise to such shared cognitive states via bottom-up processes. As an example of putative group cognition we turn to transactive memory (...)
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  39. Technology with No Human Responsibility?Deborah G. Johnson - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (4):707-715.
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  40.  20
    Let’s Pretend!: Children and Joint Action.Deborah Tollefsen - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (1):75-97.
    According to many, joint intentional action must be understood in terms of joint intentions. Most accounts of joint intention appeal to a set of sophisticated individual intentional states. The author argues that standard accounts of joint intention exclude the possibility of joint action in young children because they presuppose that the participants have a robust theory of mind, something young children lack. But young children do engage in joint action. The author offers a revision of Michael Bratman’s analysis of joint (...)
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  41. Group Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):299 – 311.
    The fact that much of our knowledge is gained through the testimony of others challenges a certain form of epistemic individualism. We are clearly not autonomous knowers. But the discussion surrounding testimony has maintained a commitment to what I have elsewhere called epistemic agent individualism. Both the reductionist and the anti-reductionist have focused their attention on the testimony of individuals. But groups, too, are sources of testimony - or so I shall argue. If groups can be testifiers, a natural question (...)
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  42.  70
    Novel Evidence and Severe Tests.Deborah G. Mayo - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (4):523-552.
    While many philosophers of science have accorded special evidential significance to tests whose results are "novel facts", there continues to be disagreement over both the definition of novelty and why it should matter. The view of novelty favored by Giere, Lakatos, Worrall and many others is that of use-novelty: An accordance between evidence e and hypothesis h provides a genuine test of h only if e is not used in h's construction. I argue that what lies behind the intuition that (...)
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  43. WIKIPEDIA and the Epistemology of Testimony.Deborah Tollefsen - 2009 - Episteme 6 (1):8-24.
    In “Group Testimony” (2007) I argued that the testimony of a group cannot be understood (or at least cannot always be understood) in a summative fashion; as the testimony of some or all of the group members. In some cases, it is the group itself that testifies. I also argued that one could extend standard reductionist accounts of the justification of testimonial belief to the case of testimonial belief formed on the basis of group testimony. In this paper, I explore (...)
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  44. The Essence of Artifacts: Developing the Design Stance.Deborah Kelemen & Susan Carey - 2007 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion. Oxford University Press. pp. 212--230.
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  45.  50
    Models of Group Selection.Deborah G. Mayo & Norman L. Gilinsky - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (4):515-538.
    The key problem in the controversy over group selection is that of defining a criterion of group selection that identifies a distinct causal process that is irreducible to the causal process of individual selection. We aim to clarify this problem and to formulate an adequate model of irreducible group selection. We distinguish two types of group selection models, labeling them type I and type II models. Type I models are invoked to explain differences among groups in their respective rates of (...)
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  46.  86
    Un-Making Artificial Moral Agents.Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
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  47.  73
    Adorno, Habermas and the Search for a Rational Society.Deborah Cook - 2004 - Routledge.
    Theodor W. Adorno and Jürgen Habermas both champion the goal of a rational society. However, they differ significantly about what this society should look like and how best to achieve it. Exploring the premises shared by both critical theorists, along with their profound disagreements about social conditions today, this book defends Adorno against Habermas' influential criticisms of his account of Western society and prospects for achieving reasonable conditions of human life. The book begins with an overview of these critical theories (...)
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  48.  18
    Selecting for the Con in Consciousness.Deborah Hodgkin & Alasdair I. Houston - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):668-669.
  49.  41
    Is It ‘Who I Am’, ‘What I Can Get Away with’, or ‘What You’Ve Done to Me’? A Multi-Theory Examination of Employee Misconduct.Deborah L. Kidder - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 57 (4):389-398.
    Research on detrimental workplace behaviors has increased recently, predominantly focusing on justice issues. Research from the integrity testing literature, which is grounded in trait theory, has not received as much attention in the management literature. Trait theory, agency theory, and psychological contracts theory each have different predictions about employee performance that is harmful to the organization. While on the surface they appear contradictory, this paper describes how each can be integrated to increase our understanding of detrimental workplace behaviors.Deborah L. (...)
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  50.  26
    Experimenting on Theories.Deborah Dowling - 1999 - Science in Context 12 (2):261-273.
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