Results for 'Debra Schwinn'

616 found
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  1.  39
    Patients' Views on Identifiability of Samples and Informed Consent for Genetic Research.Sara Chandros Hull, Richard Sharp, Jeffrey Botkin, Mark Brown, Mark Hughes, Jeremy Sugarman, Debra Schwinn, Pamela Sankar, Dragana Bolcic-Jankovic, Brian Clarridge & Benjamin Wilfond - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):62-70.
    It is unclear whether the regulatory distinction between non-identifiable and identifiable information—information used to determine informed consent practices for the use of clinically derived samples for genetic research—is meaningful to patients. The objective of this study was to examine patients' attitudes and preferences regarding use of anonymous and identifiable clinical samples for genetic research. Telephone interviews were conducted with 1,193 patients recruited from general medicine, thoracic surgery, or medical oncology clinics at five United States academic medical centers. Wanting to know (...)
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  2.  23
    Ethics, Economics, and Markets: An Interview with Debra Satz.Debra Satz - 2010 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):68-88.
  3.  53
    Justice and the Politics of Difference.Debra A. DeBruin - 1993 - Ethics 103 (2):398-400.
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  4. Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets.Debra Satz - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    In Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale, philosopher Debra Satz takes a penetrating look at those commodity exchanges that strike most of us as problematic. What considerations, she asks, ought to guide the debates about such markets? What is it about a market involving prostitution or the sale of kidneys that makes it morally objectionable? How is a market in weapons or pollution different than a market in soybeans or automobiles? Are laws and social policies banning the (...)
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  5. Book Review: Media and War: An Essay Review by Debra Pentecost. [REVIEW]Debra Pentecost - 1993 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (3):182 – 188.
     
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  6.  20
    A Conceptual Model for the Translation of Bioethics Research and Scholarship.Debra J. H. Mathews, D. Micah Hester, Jeffrey Kahn, Amy McGuire, Ross McKinney, Keith Meador, Sean Philpott-Jones, Stuart Youngner & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (5):34-39.
    While the bioethics literature demonstrates that the field has spent substantial time and thought over the last four decades on the goals, methods, and desired outcomes for service and training in bioethics, there has been less progress defining the nature and goals of bioethics research and scholarship. This gap makes it difficult both to describe the breadth and depth of these areas of bioethics and, importantly, to gauge their success. However, the gap also presents us with an opportunity to define (...)
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  7.  19
    Agora, Academy, and the Conduct of Philosophy.Debra Nails - 1995 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Agora, Academy, and the Conduct of Philosophy offers extremely careful and detailed criticisms of some of the most important assumptions scholars have brought to bear in beginning the process of (Platonic) interpretation. It goes on to offer a new way to group the dialogues, based on important facts in the lives and philosophical practices of Socrates - the main speaker in most of Plato's dialogues - and of Plato himself. Both sides of Debra Nails's arguments deserve close attention: the (...)
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  8. Equality, Adequacy, and Education for Citizenship.Debra Satz - 2007 - Ethics 117 (4):623-648.
  9.  14
    The Therapeutic “Mis”Conception: An Examination of its Normative Assumptions and a Call for its Revision.Debra J. H. Mathews, Joseph J. Fins & Eric Racine - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (1):154-162.
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  10. “Me Too”: Epistemic Injustice and the Struggle for Recognition.Debra L. Jackson - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4).
    Congdon (2017), Giladi (2018), and McConkey (2004) challenge feminist epistemologists and recognition theorists to come together to analyze epistemic injustice. I take up this challenge by highlighting the failure of recognition in cases of testimonial and hermeneutical injustice experienced by victims of sexual harassment and sexual assault. I offer the #MeToo movement as a case study to demonstrate how the process of mutual recognition makes visible and helps overcome the epistemic injustice suffered by victims of sexual harassment and sexual assault. (...)
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  11. What Do We Owe the Global Poor?Debra Satz - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):47-54.
    In this article, Satz critiques "both Pogge's use of the causal contribution principle as well as his attempt to derive all of our obligations to the global poor from the need to refrain from harming others.".
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  12.  8
    Space Trumps Time When Talking About Objects.Debra Griffiths, Andre Bester & Kenny R. Coventry - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (3):e12719.
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  13.  32
    Rational Choice and Social Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.
  14. Personal Identity and Fractured Selves: Perspectives From Philosophy, Ethics, and Neuroscience.Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Peter V. Rabins (eds.) - 2009 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    This book brings together some of the best minds in neurology and philosophy to discuss the concept of personal identity and the moral dimensions of treating ...
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  15. Rational Choice and Social Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.
  16.  33
    False Connections: Systems and Action Theories in Neofunctionalism and in Jürgen Habermas.Thomas Schwinn - 1998 - Sociological Theory 16 (1):75-95.
    Recent theoretical discussions have served to bridge the gap separating systems- and action-theoretical approaches; however, the question of their basic compatibility has rarely been raised. This paper takes up two efforts at linking systems and action theory: those of neofunctionalists and those of Jurgen habermas. Neofunctionalists start from the inadequacies of systems functionalism and seek to open it to the theory of action. Habermas, on the other hand, seeks to overcome the limits of the theory of action by widening its (...)
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  17.  41
    Being a Self: Considerations From Functional Imaging.Debra A. Gusnard - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):679-697.
    Having a self is associated with important advantages for an organism.These advantages have been suggested to include mechanisms supporting elaborate capacities for planning, decision-making, and behavioral control. Acknowledging such functionality offers possibilities for obtaining traction on investigation of neural correlates of selfhood. A method that has potential for investigating some of the brain-based properties of self arising in behavioral contexts varying in requirements for such behavioral guidance and control is functional brain imaging. Data obtained with this method are beginning to (...)
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  18.  74
    Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. [REVIEW]Debra Z. Basil, Mary S. Runte, M. Easwaramoorthy & Cathy Barr - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):387 - 398.
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer's (2006, 'Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility', Harvard Business Review, 78-92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing employees to take time (...)
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  19.  52
    The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities.Debra Bergoffen - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Challenges Beauvoir's self-portrait and argues that she was a philosopher in her own right.
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  20.  11
    Bottom Up Ethics - Neuroenhancement in Education and Employment.Debra J. H. Mathews, Hilary Bok & Alisa Carse - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (3):309-322.
    Neuroenhancement involves the use of neurotechnologies to improve cognitive, affective or behavioural functioning, where these are not judged to be clinically impaired. Questions about enhancement have become one of the key topics of neuroethics over the past decade. The current study draws on in-depth public engagement activities in ten European countries giving a bottom-up perspective on the ethics and desirability of enhancement. This informed the design of an online contrastive vignette experiment that was administered to representative samples of 1000 respondents (...)
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  21. The Moral Limits of Markets: The Case of Human Kidneys.Debra Satz - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):269-288.
    This paper examines the morality of kidney markets through the lens of choice, inequality, and weak agency looking at the case for limiting such markets under both non-ideal and ideal circumstances. Regulating markets can go some way to addressing the problems of inequality and weak agency. The choice issue is different and this paper shows that the choice for some to sell their kidneys can have external effects on those who do not want to do so, constraining the options that (...)
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  22.  37
    Using the PET Assessment Instrument to Help Students Identify Factors That Could Impede Moral Behavior.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):129 - 145.
    We present an instrument developed to explain to students the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET). The PET represents an individual’s susceptibility to situational pressure in his or her organization that makes moral behavior more personally difficult. Further, the PET varies according to the moral intensity of the issue at hand, such that individuals are less vulnerable to situational pressure for issues of high moral intensity, i.e., those with greater consequences for others. A higher PET reflects an individual’s greater (...)
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  23.  7
    Polishing the Apple: A Holistic Approach to Developing Public Health Law Educators as Leaders of Change.Debra Gerardi - 2016 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 44 (s1):87-92.
    The RWJF public health law faculty fellowship provided an opportunity for legal and public health scholars to come together to develop innovative approaches for teaching public health law in schools of law, public health, medicine, and social work nationally. The fellowship program emphasized the importance of integrating individual change with organizational change as twin pillars of the core competencies necessary for advancing public health law education. This article describes the curriculum and learning formats used throughout the fellowship to guide the (...)
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  24. Countering the Wrongs of the Past: The Role of Compensation.Debra Satz - 2007 - In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.
     
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  25.  29
    Highlighting Moral Courage in the Business Ethics Course.Debra R. Comer & Michael Schwartz - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (3):703-723.
    At the end of their article in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of Business Ethics, Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth, and Catherine E. Schwoerer state that they are “hopeful in outlook” about the “evidence that business ethics instructors are….able to encourage students…to develop the courage to come forward even when pressures in organizations dictate otherwise”. We agree with May et al. that it is essential to augment students’ moral courage. However, it seems overly optimistic to believe that (...)
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  26.  16
    Accounting for Cosmetic Surgery in the USA and Great Britain: A Cross-Cultural Analysis of Women's Narratives.Debra Gimlin - 2007 - Body and Society 13 (1):41-60.
    The concept of ‘accounts’ – or linguistic strategies for neutralizing the negative social meanings of norm violation – has a long history in sociology. This work examines British and American women's accounts of cosmetic surgery. In the medical literature, feminist writings and the popular press, aesthetic plastic surgery has been associated with narcissism, psychological instability and self-hatred. Given these negative connotations, cosmetic surgery remains a practice requiring justification even as its popularity increases. Drawing on interview data, I argue that respondents' (...)
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  27.  51
    The Problem of Humiliation in Peer Review.Debra R. Comer & Michael Schwartz - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (2):141-156.
    This paper examines the problem of vituperative feedback from peer reviewers. We argue that such feedback is morally unacceptable, insofar as it humiliates authors and damages their dignity. We draw from social-psychological research to explore those aspects of the peer-review process in general and the anonymity of blind reviewing in particular that contribute to reviewers’ humiliating comments. We then apply Iris Murdoch's ideas about a virtuous consciousness and humility to make the case that peer referees have a moral obligation not (...)
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  28. Markets in Women's Reproductive Labor.Debra Satz - 1992 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (2):107-131.
  29. Markets in Women's Sexual Labor.Debra Satz - 1995 - Ethics 106 (1):63-85.
  30.  43
    Agonism and Arete.Debra Hawhee - 2002 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 35 (3):185-207.
  31.  9
    Using the PET Assessment Instrument to Help Students Identify Factors That Could Impede Moral Behavior.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):129-145.
    We present an instrument developed to explain to students the concept of the personal ethical threshold. The PET represents an individual's susceptibility to situational pressure in his or her organization that makes moral behavior more personally difficult. Further, the PET varies according to the moral intensity of the issue at hand, such that individuals are less vulnerable to situational pressure for issues of high moral intensity, i.e., those with greater consequences for others. A higher PET reflects an individual's greater likelihood (...)
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  32.  18
    American Legacies and the Variable Life Histories of Women and Men.Debra S. Judge - 1995 - Human Nature 6 (4):291-323.
    Sex differences in behavior are most interesting when they are the result of inherent differences in the operational rules motivating behavior and not merely a reflection of differing life history experiences. American men and women exhibit a few differences in testamentary patterns of property allocation that appear to be due to inherently different rules of allocation. Even when analyses control for resources and surviving kin configurations, women distribute their property among a greater number of individual beneficiaries than do men. The (...)
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  33.  1
    A Reader in Feminist Ethics.Debra A. Shogan (ed.) - 1992 - Canadian Scholars' Press.
  34. The Contribution of Rational Choice Theory to Macrosociological Research.Debra Friedman & Michael Hechter - 1988 - Sociological Theory 6 (2):201-218.
    Because it consists of an entire family of specific theories derived from the same first principles, rational choice offers one approach to generate explanations that provide for micro-macro links, and to attack a wide variety of empirical problems in macrosociology. The aims of this paper are (1) to provide a bare skeleton of all rational choice arguments; (2) to demonstrate their applicability to a range of macrosociological concerns by reviewing a sample of both new and classic works; and (3) to (...)
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  35.  35
    Maintaining Therapeutic Boundaries: The Motive is Therapeutic Effectiveness, Not Defensive Practice.Debra S. Borys - 1994 - Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):267 – 273.
    In his article "How Certain Boundaries and Ethics Diminish Therapeutic Effectiveness", Lazarus asserts that many clinicians are adhering to strict therapeutic boundaries and ethics in a fear-driven effort to avoid unwarranted malpractice claims. Although I agree that maintenance of conventional therapeutic boundaries is apt to minimize malpractice claims in most cases, I believe that is because such boundaries are critical to protect patients' welfare and thereby promote effective treatment. My reasoning, discussed next, revolves around the following premises: 1. For many, (...)
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  36.  43
    Toward a Bestial Rhetoric.Debra Hawhee - 2011 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (1):81-87.
    In 1993, my first full year as a master’s student studying rhetoric at the University of Tennessee, the venerable George Kennedy visited campus. He was part of a star-studded interdisciplinary symposium on rhetoric (Page duBois and Thomas Cole were the other two guests), and if memory serves, the large crowd awaiting Kennedy’s talk stirred with anticipation; this event was two years after the publication of a much-needed and now indispensible translation of Aristotle’s Rhetoric. After the talk, it stirred with something (...)
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  37. Posthuman Urbanism: Mapping Bodies in Contemporary City Space.Debra Benita Shaw - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Posthuman Urbanism explores what it means to live in an urban environment with reference to posthuman theory. The book argues that contemporary science and technology offers radically different ways for changing the way we live in city spaces today. It will be of interest to students and academics in Cultural Studies, Urban Studies, Critical Geography, Science and Technology Studies, Sociology, Architecture and Anthropology.
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  38.  8
    The Enemies of Perfection: Oakeshott, Plato, and the Critique of Rationalism.Debra Candreva - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    In The Enemies of Perfection, author Debra Candreva argues that Plato's philosophy is among the most important influences on Oakeshott's thought, with his debts to Plato far outweighing his criticisms. Further, Candreva's examination of Oakeshott's treatment of Plato forms the basis of an argument against the view that a radical gap between ancient and modern thought renders ancient philosophy either inaccessible or irrelevant to current thinking.
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  39.  10
    Unification, Universalism, and Rational Choice Theory.Debra Satz & John Ferejohn - 2017 - In Louis Putterman (ed.), The Rational Choice Controversy. Yale University Press. pp. 71-84.
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  40.  9
    Does Word Identification Proceed From Spelling to Sound to Meaning?Debra Jared & Mark S. Seidenberg - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (4):358-394.
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  41.  14
    Disgust: Evolved Function and Structure.Joshua M. Tybur, Debra Lieberman, Robert Kurzban & Peter DeScioli - 2013 - Psychological Review 120 (1):65-84.
  42. Two Dogmas of Platonism.Debra Nails - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):77-112.
    Contemporary platonism has been conditioned in large part by two dogmas. One is the belief in a fundamental cleavage between intelligible but invisible Platonic forms that are real and eternal, and perceptible objects whose confinement to spacetime constitutes an inferior existence and about which knowledge is impossible. The other dogma involves a kind of reductionism: the belief that Plato’s unhypothetical first principle of the all is identical to the form of the good. Both dogmas, I argue, are ill-founded.
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  43. How Clinical Trials Really Work Rethinking Research Ethics.Debra A. DeBruin, Joan Liaschenko & Anastasia Fisher - 2011 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):121-139.
    Clinical trials are a central mechanism in the production of medical knowledge. They are the gold standard by which such knowledge is evaluated. They are widespread both in the United States and internationally; a National Institute of Health database reports over 106,000 active industry and government-sponsored trials (National Institutes of Health n.d.). They are an engine of the economy. The work of trials is complex; multiple people with diverse interests working across multiple settings simultaneously participate in them, and they are (...)
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  44. Reflections on “Vulnerability.”.Debra DeBruin - 2001 - Bioethics Examiner 5 (2):1-4.
  45.  14
    An Investigation of the Efficacy of Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy for Academic Procrastination.Debra M. Glick & Susan M. Orsillo - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (2):400-409.
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  46. Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery and Abortion.Debra Satz - 1996 - Ethics 106 (4):864-866.
  47.  3
    Policing Women to Protect Fetuses: Coercive Interventions During Pregnancy.Debra A. DeBruin & Mary Faith Marshall - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Springer. pp. 95-111.
    Women are routinely subjected to penetrating surveillance during pregnancy. On the surface, this may appear to flow from a cultural commitment to protect babies – a cultural practice of “better safe than sorry” that is particularly vigilant given the vulnerability of fetuses and babies. In reality, pregnancy occasions incursions against human rights and well-being that would be anathema in other contexts. Our cultural practices concerning risk in pregnancy are infused with oppressive norms about women’s responsibility for pregnancy outcomes and the (...)
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  48. Liberalism, Economic Freedom, and the Limits of Markets.Debra Satz - 2007 - Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):120-140.
    This paper points to a lost and ignored strand of argument in the writings of liberalism's earliest defenders. These “classical” liberals recognized that market liberty was not always compatible with individual liberty. In particular, they argued that labor markets required intervention and regulation if workers were not to be wholly subjugated to the power of their employers. Functioning capitalist labor markets (along with functioning credit markets) are not “natural” outgrowths of exchange, but achievements hard won in the battle against feudalism. (...)
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  49.  20
    Food Safety Risks, Disruptive Events and Alternative Beef Production: A Case Study of Agricultural Transition in Alberta.Debra J. Davidson, Kevin E. Jones & John R. Parkins - 2016 - Agriculture and Human Values 33 (2):359-371.
    A key focus for agri-food scholars today pertains to emerging “alternative food movements,” particularly their long-term viability, and their potential to induce transitions in our prevailing conventional global agri-food systems. One under-studied element in recent research on sustainability transitions more broadly is the role of disruptive events in the emergence or expansion of these movements. We present the findings of a case study of the effect of a sudden acute food safety crisis—bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or mad cow disease—on alternative beef (...)
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  50.  6
    Platonic Interpretive Strategies, and the History of Philosophy, with a Comment on Renaud.Debra Nails - 2016 - Plato Journal 16:109-122.
    François Renaud replies to the question of what principles one ought to employ in the study of Plato by arguing that, and demonstrating how, the argument and the drama operate together successfully in the Gorgias. In agreement with Renaud’s approach, I expose some historical roots with a review of Platonic interpretive strategies of the modern period in the context of history of philosophy more generally. I also try to show why argument and drama operate together, an insight I attribute to (...)
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