Search results for 'Deep ecology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  72
    Colette Sciberras (2002). Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism: The Self in Environmental Philosophy. Dissertation, Lancaster
    I consider the issue of the self and its relation to the environment, focusing on the accounts given in ecofeminism and deep ecology. Though both stress the relatedness of the human self to nature, these accounts differ in various ways. Ecofeminism stresses the value of personal relations with particular others, whereas deep ecology argues that we should expand our sense of self to include all natural others and the whole of nature. Deep ecology’s views (...)
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  2. Frederic L. Bender (2003). The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Humanity Books.
     
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  3.  28
    Benjamin Howe (2010). Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the movement’s (...)
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  4. Eric Katz, Andrew Light & David Rothenberg (2000). Beneath the Surface Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology.
     
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  5.  10
    Anthony Weston (2001). Beneath the Surface: Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):331-334.
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  6. Warwick Fox (forthcoming). Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy of Our Time? Environmental Ethics.
     
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  7. Kent Peacock (2003). Eric Katz, Andrew Light and David Rothenberg, Eds., Beneath the Surface: Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (2):110-112.
     
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  8. Ellen Miller (2012). Listening to Deep Ecology, Ecofeminism and Trees: The Giving Tree and Environmental Philosophy. In Peter Costello (ed.), Philosophy and Children's Literature. Lexington Books. pp. 251-267.
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  9.  1
    Julian Agyeman (2003). Agyeman, Julian, Bullard, Robert D. And Evans, Bob (Eds)(2003) Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Bender, Frederic L.(2003) The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology, Amherst, NY: Humanity Books. Greenough, Paul R. And Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt (2003) Nature in the Global South. [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (3):283-284.
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  10.  4
    Peter Reed & David Rothenberg (1992). Wisdom in the Open Air: The Norwegian Roots of Deep Ecology. Univ of Minnesota Press.
  11.  37
    Terry Hoy (2000). Toward a Naturalistic Political Theory: Aristotle, Hume, Dewey, Evolutionary Biology, and Deep Ecology. Praeger.
    Hoy seeks to establish a basis for a naturalistic political theory as a continuity from Aristotle through the Enlightenment and Post-Enlightenment contributions ...
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  12.  11
    Hans-Dirk van Hoogstraten (2001). Deep Economy: Caring for Ecology, Humanity, and Religion. James Clarke & Co..
    A wide-ranging analysis of the economic world order and its ecological and theological dimensions, this unique and challenging work confronts us with the ...
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  13. Arne Naess (1984). A Defence of the Deep Ecology Movement. Environmental Ethics 6 (3):265-270.
    There is an international deep ecology social movement with key terms, slogans, and rhetorical use of language comparable to what we find in other activist “alternative” movements today. Some supporters of the movement partake in academic philosophy and have developed or at least suggested philosophies, “ecosophies,” inspired by the movement. R. A. Watson does not distinguish sufficiently between the movement and the philosophical expressions with academic pretensions. As a result, he falsely concludes that deep ecology (...)
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  14.  12
    Harold Glasser (1997). On Warwick Fox's Assessment of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 19 (1):69-85.
    I examine Fox’s tripartite characterization of deep ecology. His assessment abandons Naess’s emphasis upon the pluralism of ultimate norms by distilling what I refer to as the deep ecology approach to “Self-realization!” Contrary to Fox, I argue that his popular sense is distinctive and his formal sense is tenable. Fox’s philosophical sense, while distinctive, is neither necessary nor sufficient to adequately characterize the deep ecology approach. I contend that the deep ecology approach, (...)
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  15.  13
    Eric H. Reitan (1996). Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality. Environmental Ethics 18 (4):411-424.
    Both Arne Naess and Warwick Fox have argued that deep ecology, in terms of “Selfrealization,” is essentially nonmoral. I argue that the attainment of the ecological Self does not render morality in the richest sense “superfluous,” as Fox suggests. To the contrary, the achievement of the ecological Self is a precondition for being a truly moral person, both from the perspective of a robust Kantian moral frameworkand from the perspective of Aristotelian virtue ethics. The opposition between selfregard and (...)
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  16.  42
    Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. (...)
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  17.  32
    Simon P. James (2000). “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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  18.  50
    Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental (...)
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  19.  22
    Robert Sessions (1991). Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies? Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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  20.  41
    Harold Glasser (2011). Naess's Deep Ecology: Implications for the Human Prospect and Challenges for the Future. Inquiry 54 (1):52-77.
    What sets Naess's deep ecology apart from most inquiries into environmental philosophy is that it does not seek a radical shift in fundamental values. Naess offered a utopian, life-affirming grand narrative, a new Weltanschauung that shifted the focus of inquiry to coupling values, knowledge, understanding, and wisdom to behavior. The core of Naess's approach is that sustainability hinges on developing more thoroughly reasoned and consistent views, policies, and actions, which are tied back to wide-identifying ultimate norms and (...)
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  21.  5
    Magdalena Holy-Luczaj (2015). Heidegger's Support for Deep Ecology Reexamined Once Again: Ontological Egalitarianism, or Farewell to the Great Chain of Being. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):45-66.
    It is said an attempt to reconcile Heidegger's ontology with the position of deep ecology finds the going rugged. Yet, I believe it is worth hiking this path once again to reexamine the connections between deep ecology and the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. Significantly, we will see the importance of Heidegger's critique of the idea of the great chain of being.Taking the perspective of deep ecology requires us to consider whether Heidegger's being-centered approach (...)
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  22.  34
    William Aiken (1994). Is Deep Ecology Too Radical? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):1-5.
    The theory of Deep Ecology is characterized as having two essential features: the belief that nature is inherently valuable, and the belief that one’s self is truly realized by identification with nature. Four common but different meanings of the term “radical” are presented. Whether the theory of Deep Ecology is “too radical” depends upon which of these meanings one is using.
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  23.  60
    Jim Cheney (1987). Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted (...)
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  24.  96
    Ariel Kay Salleh (1984). Deeper Than Deep Ecology: The Eco-Feminist Connection. Environmental Ethics 6 (4):339-345.
    I offer a feminist critique of deep ecology as presented in the seminal papers of Naess and Devall. I outline the fundamental premises involved and analyze their internal coherence. Not only are there problems on logical grounds, but the tacit methodological approach of the two papers are inconsistent with the deep ecologists’ own substantive comments. I discuss these shortcomings in terms of a broader feminist critique of patriarchal culture and point out some practical and theoretical contributions which (...)
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  25.  56
    Warwick Fox (1989). The Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate and its Parallels. Environmental Ethics 11 (1):5-25.
    There has recently been considerable discussion of the relative merits of deep ecology and ecofeminism, primarily from an ecofeminist perspective. I argue that the essential ecofeminist charge against deep ecology is that deep ecology focuses on the issue of anthropocentrism (i.e., human-centeredness) rather than androcentrism (i.e., malecenteredness). I point out that this charge is not directed at deep ecology’s positive or constructive task of encouraging an attitude of ecocentric egalitarianism, but rather at (...)
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  26.  82
    Ariel Salleh (1992). The Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 14 (3):195-216.
    I discuss conceptual confusions shared by deep ecologists over such questions as gender, essentialism, normative dualism, and eco-centrism. I conclude that deep ecologists have failed to grasp both the epistemological challenge offered by ecofeminism and the practical labor involved in bringing about social change. While convergencies between deep ecology and ecofeminism promise to be fruitful, these are celebrated in false consciousness, unless remedial work is done.
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  27.  26
    Deborah Slicer (1995). Is There an Ecofeminism–Deep Ecology “Debate”? Environmental Ethics 17 (2):151-169.
    I discuss six problems with Warwick Fox’s “The Deep Ecology–Ecofeminism Debate and Its Parallels” and conclude that until Fox and some other deep ecologists take the time to study feminism and ecofeminist analyses, only disputes—not genuine debate—will occur between these two parties. An understanding of the six issues that I discuss is a precondition for such a debate.
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  28.  68
    Michael E. Zimmerman (1993). Rethinking the Heidegger-Deep Ecology Relationship. Environmental Ethics 15 (3):195-224.
    Recent disclosures regarding the relationship between Heidegger’s thought and his own version of National Socialism have led me to rethink my earlier efforts to portray Heidegger as a forerunner of deep ecology. His political problems have provided ammunition for critics, such as Murray Bookchin, who regard deep ecology as a reactionary movement. In this essay, I argue that, despite some similarities, Heidegger’s thought and deep ecology are in many ways incompatible, in part because (...) ecologists—in spite of their criticism of the ecologically destructive character of technological modernity—generally support a “progressive” idea of human evolution. (shrink)
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  29.  26
    Frank B. Golley (1987). Deep Ecology From the Perspective of Environmental Science. Environmental Ethics 9 (1):45-55.
    Deep ecology is examined from the perspective of scientific ecology. Two norms, self-realization and biocentric equality, are considered central to deep ecology, and are explored in brief. Concepts of scientific ecology that seem to form a bridge to these norms are ecological hierarchical organization, the exchange of energy, material and information, and the development of species within ecosystems and the biosphere. While semantic problems exist, conceptually it appears that deep ecology norms can (...)
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  30.  31
    Mick Smith (1999). To Speak of Trees: Social Constructivism, Environmental Values, and the Future of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):359-376.
    The power and the promise of deep ecology is seen, by its supporters and detractors alike, to lie in its claims to speak on behalf of a natural world threatened by human excesses. Yet, to speak of trees as trees or nature as something worthy of respect in itself has appeared increasingly difficult in the light of social constructivist accounts of “nature.” Deep ecology has been loath to take constructivism’s insightsseriously, retreating into forms of biological objectivism (...)
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  31.  19
    Freya Mathews (1988). Conservation and Self-Realization: A Deep Ecology Perspective. Environmental Ethics 10 (4):347-355.
    Nature in its wider cosmic sense is not at risk from human exploitation and predation. To see life on Earth as but a local manifestation of this wider, indestructable and inexhaustible nature is to shield ourselves from despair over the fate of our Earth. But to take this wide view also appears to make interventionist political action on behalf of nature-which is to say, conservation-superfluous. If we identify with nature in its widest sense, as deep ecology prescribes, then (...)
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  32.  2
    Tony Lynch & Stephen Norris (2016). On the Enduring Importance of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 38 (1):63-75.
    It is common to hear that deep ecology “has reached its logical conclusion and exhausted itself” in a vacuous anthropomorphism and absurd nonanthropocentrism. These conclusions should be rejected. Properly understood, neither objection poses a serious problem for deep ecology so much as for the ethic of “ecological holism” which some philosophers—wrongly—have taken to arise from deep ecology. Deep ecology is not such an ethic, but is best understood as an aesthetically articulated conception (...)
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  33.  20
    Ariel Salleh (1993). Class, Race, and Gender Discourse in the Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 15 (3):225-244.
    While both ecofeminism and deep ecology share a commitment to overcoming the conventional division between humanity and nature, a major difference between the two is that deep ecology brings little social analysis to its environmental ethic. I argue that there are ideological reasons for this difference. Applying a sociology of knowledge and discourse analysis to deep ecological texts to uncover these reasons, I conclude that deep ecology is constrained by political attitudes meaningful to (...)
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  34.  22
    Arne Naess (1990). Man Apart and Deep Ecology: A Reply to Reed. Environmental Ethics 12 (2):185-192.
    Peter Reed has defended the basis for an environmental ethic based upon feelings of awe for nature together with an existentialist absolute gulf between humans and nature. In so doing, he has claimed that there are serious difficulties with Ecosophy T and the terms, Self-realization and identification with nature. I distinguish between discussions of ultimate norms and the penultimate deep ecology platform. I also clarify and defend a technical use of identification and attempt to show that awe and (...)
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  35.  13
    David M. Johns (1990). The Relevance of Deep Ecology to the Third World: Some Preliminary Comments. Environmental Ethics 12 (3):233-252.
    Although Ramachandra Guha has demonstrated the importance of cross-cultural dialogue on environmental issues and has much to tell us about the problems of wildemess preservation in the Third World, I argue that Guha is partly wrong in claiming that deep ecology equates environmental protection with wilderness protection and simply wrong in calling wilderness protection untenable or incorrect as aglobal strategy for environmental protection. Moreover, I argue that the deep ecology distinction between anthropocentrism and biocentrism is useful (...)
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  36.  10
    Mathew Humphrey (1999). Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality: A Response. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):75-79.
    In his article “Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality,” Eric H. Reitan contends that, contrary to the disavowals of Fox and Naess, the “ecosophy T” concept of “Self-realization” constitutes a precondition of morality according to a “robust” Kantian moral framework. I suggest that there is a significant problem involved in rendering Self-realization compatible with a Kantian moral framework. This problem of ontological priority demonstrates that Naess and Fox are in fact correct in their assertion that Self-realization is (...)
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  37.  8
    Mathew Humphrey (1999). Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality. Environmental Ethics 21 (1):75-79.
    In his article “Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality,” Eric H. Reitan contends that, contrary to the disavowals of Fox and Naess, the “ecosophy T” concept of “Self-realization” constitutes a precondition of morality according to a “robust” Kantian moral framework. I suggest that there is a significant problem involved in rendering Self-realization compatible with a Kantian moral framework. This problem of ontological priority demonstrates that Naess and Fox are in fact correct in their assertion that Self-realization is (...)
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  38.  70
    Bill Devall (2001). The Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement: 1960-2000--A Review. Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):18-41.
    : Aarne Naess, in a seminal paper on environmental philosophy, distinguished between two streams of environmental philosophy and activism--shallow and deep. The deep, long-range ecology movement has developed over the past four decades on a variety of fronts. However, in the context of global conferences on development, population, and environment held during the 1990s, even shallow environmentalism seems to have less priority than demands for worldwide economic growth based on trade liberalization and a free market (...)
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  39.  13
    Glen Mazis (2004). Deep Ecology, The Reversibility of the Flesh of the World and the Poetic Word. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):46-61.
    This essay seeks to supplement Arnie Naess’s avowed project of replacing the often cited model of “humans and environment,” which retains a dualistic and anthropocentric connotation, with the articulation of a “relational total-field image” of human being’s insertion in the planetary field of energy and becoming. In response to the interview “Here I Stand” in which Naess rejects Merleau-Ponty’s ontology, this essay details the ways in which Merleau-Ponty provides the kind of ontology that Naess requires for his deep (...). Naess’s use of Hindu terms and metaphysics is shown to be at odds with his descriptions of human’s relations with the world. Much of the essay critiques as well Naess’s rejection of poetic language as inadequate to the philosophical task of articulating the human-world intertwining. Using Merleau-Ponty’s work, the need for the poetic as uniquely articulating “the flesh of the world” and “reversibility” is described, hopefully showing that deep ecology’s goal of making people feel their insertion in the world’s field of becoming can only occur through inaugurating poetic uses of language. (shrink)
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  40. Harold Glasser (forthcoming). Demystifying the Critiques of Deep Ecology. Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. Upper Saddle River, Nj: Prentice Hall.
     
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  41.  16
    David Keller (1997). Gleaning Lessons From Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):139-148.
    By reflecting on deep ecology, several lessons can be culled for environmental philosophy in general. The deep ecology of Arne Naess, Bill Devall, and George Sessions is appropriately characterized as a theory founded on the principles of biocentric egalitarianism and metaphysical holism. After considering each of these principles in turn, and then in relation to each other, the lesson turns out to be that the ontological foundation for environmental ethics must be nonegalitarion and polycentric.
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  42.  15
    Wendy Lee-Lampshire (1996). Anthropomorphism Without Anthropocentrism: A Wittgensteinian Ecofeminist Alternative to Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 1 (2):91-102.
    While articulating a philosophy of ecology which reconciles deep ecology with ecofeminism may be a laudable project, it remains at best unclear whether this attempt will be successful. I argue that one recent attempt, Carol Bigwood 's feminized deep ecology, fails in that, despite disclaimers, it reproduces important elements of some deep ecologist's essentializing discourse which ecofeminists argue are responsible for the identification with and dual oppression of women and nature. I then propose (...)
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  43.  25
    William Grey (1986). A Critique of Deep Ecology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):211-216.
    Our environmental crisis is commonly explained as a product of a set of attitudes and beliefs about the world which have been developed by post‐Cartesian technological society. Deep ecologists claim that the crisis can only be overcome by adopting an alternative non‐technological paradigm, such as can be discovered in non‐Western cultures. In this paper I express misgivings about the use of the expression ‘Paradigm’ by deep ecologists, question the claim that a science‐based world‐view inevitably fosters manipulative and exploitative (...)
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  44.  19
    Michael E. Zimmerman (1986). Implications Fo Heidegger's Thought for Deep Ecology. Modern Schoolman 64 (1):19-43.
  45.  32
    Robin Attfield (1990). Deep Ecology and Intrinsic Value. Cogito 4 (1):61-66.
  46.  9
    Andrew McLaughlin (1986). Deep Ecology. Philosophical Inquiry 8 (3-4):188-188.
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  47.  21
    Donald N. Blakeley (2004). The Mysticism of Plotinus and Deep Ecology. Journal of Philosophical Research 29:1-28.
  48.  20
    Christian Diehm (2004). Deep Ecology and Phenomenology. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):20-27.
    This essay is written as a companion to the interview “Here I Stand,” and it examines the place of phenomenology in the environmental thought of deep ecologist Arne Naess. Tracing a line through Naess’s somewhat sporadic references to phenomenology, and his comments in the interview, the article argues that Naess’s interest in phenomenology is tied to his attempts to develop an ontology, and tries to show how this project situates Naess in relation to several phenomenologists. The essay concludes with (...)
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  49.  17
    Alan R. Drengson (1988). Bill Devall and George Sessions: Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 10 (1):83-89.
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  50.  18
    Michael E. Zimmerman (1986). Deep Ecology. International Philosophical Quarterly 26 (2):195-198.
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