Results for 'Defining Knowledge'

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  1. Defining Science.William Whewell & Natural Knowledge - 1994 - History of Science 32 (3):345.
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  2.  14
    Williamson on Defining Knowledge.Manuel Pérez Otero - forthcoming - Episteme:1-17.
    In his outstanding book Knowledge and its Limits, Williamson claims that we have inductive evidence for some negative theses concerning the prospects of defining knowledge, like this: knowing cannot be defined in accordance with a determinate traditional conjunctive scheme; defends a theory of mental states, mental concepts and the relations between the two, from which we would obtain additional, not merely inductive, evidence for this negative thesis; and presents an alternative definition of knowledge. Here I consider (...)
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    Defining Knowledge in Terms of Belief: The Modal Logic Perspective.Joseph Y. Halpern, Dov Samet & Ella Segev - 2009 - Review of Symbolic Logic 2 (3):469-487.
    The question of whether knowledge is definable in terms of belief, which has played an important role in epistemology for the last 50 years, is studied here in the framework of epistemic and doxastic logics. Three notions of definability are considered: explicit definability, implicit definability, and reducibility, where explicit definability is equivalent to the combination of implicit definability and reducibility. It is shown that if knowledge satisfies any set of axioms contained in S5, then it cannot be explicitly (...)
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    Defining Knowledge in Terms of Belief: The Modal Logic Perspective: Defining Knowledge in Terms of Belief.Joseph Y. Halpern - 2009 - Review of Symbolic Logic 2 (3):469-487.
    The question of whether knowledge is definable in terms of belief, which has played an important role in epistemology for the last 50 years, is studied here in the framework of epistemic and doxastic logics. Three notions of definability are considered: explicit definability, implicit definability, and reducibility, where explicit definability is equivalent to the combination of implicit definability and reducibility. It is shown that if knowledge satisfies any set of axioms contained in S5, then it cannot be explicitly (...)
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  5.  90
    Defining Knowledge.Sally Haslanger - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:41-55.
    With some notable exceptions, feminist epistemologists have not focused (like many contemporary analytic epistemologists) on the the semantics of claims to know: What are the truth conditions of claims of the form S knows that p? My goal in this paper is to suggest a way of approaching the task of specifying the truth conditions for knowledge while (hopefully) making clear how a broad range of feminist work that is often deemed irrelevant to the philosophical inquiry into knowledge (...)
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  6. Edible Insects – Defining Knowledge Gaps in Biological and Ethical Considerations of Entomophagy.Isabella Pali-Schöll, Regina Binder, Yves Moens, Friedrich Polesny & Susana Monsó - 2019 - Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 17 (59):2760-2771.
    While seeking novel food sources to feed the increasing population of the globe, several alternatives have been discussed, including algae, fungi or in vitro meat. The increasingly propagated usage of farmed insects for human nutrition raises issues regarding food safety, consumer information and animal protection. In line with law, insects like any other animals must not be reared or manipulated in a way that inflicts unnecessary pain, distress or harm on them. Currently, there is a great need for research in (...)
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  7. Higher Education as a Field of Study in China: Defining Knowledge and Curriculum Structure.Xin Wang - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    Higher Education as a Field of Study in China concerns higher education as an academic field—the evolving nature of the field in light of the overall development of higher education in China. Xin Wang illustrates how higher education is becoming an interdisciplinary field rather than a subfield under the discipline of education, especially when higher education has become an enterprise with such a broad scope in China.
     
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  8. Defining Science. William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain.R. Yeo & G. Cantor - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (1):88-89.
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    Essay Review: William Whewell: Rough Diamond, Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian BritainDefining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain. YeoRichard . Pp. Xiv + 280. £35.00.Jack Morrell - 1994 - History of Science 32 (3):345-359.
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    Richard Yeo, Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. Xiii + 280. ISBN 0-521-43182-4. £35.00, $54.95. [REVIEW]Brian Dolan - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Science 27 (3):374-375.
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    Skeptical Arguments and Defining the Topic of Theory of Knowledge.Svetlana Knjazeva-Adamović - 1994 - Theoria 37 (2):7-18.
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    Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain.Thomas William Heyck - 1996 - History of European Ideas 22 (2):177-178.
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    Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain. Richard Yeo.Menachem Fisch - 1994 - Isis 85 (4):706-707.
  14.  1
    Defining Science: William Whewell, Natural Knowledge, and Public Debate in Early Victorian Britain by Richard Yeo. [REVIEW]Menachem Fisch - 1994 - Isis 85:706-707.
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  15. Defining and Refining Nursing Knowledge.J. C. McCloskey & H. K. Grace - 1990 - In Joanne McCloskey Dochterman & Helen K. Grace (eds.), Current Issues in Nursing. Mosby. pp. 42--44.
     
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  16.  32
    Why to Believe Weakly in Weak Knowledge: Goldman on Knowledge as Mere True Belief.Christoph Jäger - 2009 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 79 (1):19-40.
    In a series of influential papers and in his groundbreaking book Knowledge in a Social World Alvin Goldman argues that sometimes “know” just means “believe truly” (Goldman 1999; 2001; 2002b; Goldman & Olsson 2009). I argue that Goldman's (and Olsson's) case for “weak knowledge”, as well as a similar argument put forth by John Hawthorne, are unsuccessful. However, I also believe that Goldman does put his finger on an interesting and important phenomenon. He alerts us to the fact (...)
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  17. Knowledge and Cognitive Integration.Spyridon Orestis Palermos - 2014 - Synthese 191 (8):1931-1951.
    Cognitive integration is a defining yet overlooked feature of our intellect that may nevertheless have substantial effects on the process of knowledge-acquisition. To bring those effects to the fore, I explore the topic of cognitive integration both from the perspective of virtue reliabilism within externalist epistemology and the perspective of extended cognition within externalist philosophy of mind and cognitive science. On the basis of this interdisciplinary focus, I argue that cognitive integration can provide a minimalist yet adequate epistemic (...)
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  18.  33
    The Difference Between Knowledge and Understanding.Sherrilyn Roush - 2017 - Explaining Knowledge: New Essays on the Gettier Problem.
    In the aftermath of Gettier’s examples, knowledge came to be thought of as what you would have if in addition to a true belief and your favorite epistemic goody, such as justifiedness, you also were ungettiered, and the theory of knowledge was frequently equated, especially by its detractors, with the project of pinning down that extra bit. It would follow that knowledge contributes something distinctive that makes it indispensable in our pantheon of epistemic concepts only if avoiding (...)
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    Knowledge, Virtue, and Action: Putting Epistemic Virtues to Work.Tim Henning & David P. Schweikard (eds.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    This volume brings together recent work by leading and up-and-coming philosophers on the topic of virtue epistemology. The prospects of virtue-theoretic analyses of knowledge depend crucially on our ability to give some independent account of what epistemic virtues are and what they are _for_. The contributions here ask how epistemic virtues matter apart from any narrow concern with defining knowledge; they show how epistemic virtues figure in accounts of various aspects of our lives, with a special emphasis (...)
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  20. Self‐Knowledge and Rational Agency: A Defense of Empiricism.Brie Gertler - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 96 (1):91-109.
    How does one know one's own beliefs, intentions, and other attitudes? Many responses to this question are broadly empiricist, in that they take self-knowledge to be epistemically based in empirical justification or warrant. Empiricism about self-knowledge faces an influential objection: that it portrays us as mere observers of a passing cognitive show, and neglects the fact that believing and intending are things we do, for reasons. According to the competing, agentialist conception of self-knowledge, our capacity for self- (...) derives from our rational agency—our ability to conform our attitudes to our reasons, and to commit ourselves to those attitudes through avowals. This paper has two goals. The first is exegetical: to identify agentialism's defining thesis and precisely formulate the agentialist challenge to empiricism. The second goal is to defend empiricism from the agentialist challenge. I propose a way to understand the role of agency in reasoning and avowals, one that does justice to what is distinctive about these phenomena yet is compatible with empiricism about self-knowledge. (shrink)
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  21. A Priori Knowledge in Perspective: Naming, Necessity and the Analytic a Posteriori.Stephen Palmquist - 1987 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):255 - 282.
    This is the second in a two part series of articles that attempt to clarify the nature and enduring relevance of Kant's concept of a priori knowledge. (For Part I, see below.) In this article I focus mainly on Saul Kripke's critique of Kant, in Naming and Necessity. I argue that Kripke draws attention to a genuine defect in Kant's epistemological framework, but that he used definitions of certain key terms that were quite different from Kant's definitions. When Kripke's (...)
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  22. The Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge.Karl R. Popper - 2009 - Routledge.
    A brief historical comment on scientific knowledge as Socratic ignorance -- Some critical comments on the text of this book, particularly on the theory of truth Exposition [1933] -- Problem of Induction (Experience and Hypothesis) -- Two Fundamental Problems of the Theory of Knowledge -- Formulation of the Problem -- The problem of induction and the problem of demarcation -- Deductivtsm and Inductivism -- Comments on how the solutions are reached and preliminary presentation of the solutions -- Rationalism (...)
     
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  23.  31
    University and Business Relations: Connecting the Knowledge Economy.J. Stanley Metcalfe - 2010 - Minerva 48 (1):5-33.
    It is commonplace to say that the modern economy is knowledge based but a moment’s reflection points to the vacuity of this notion. For all economies are knowledge based and could not be otherwise. The question is rather how is one kind of knowledge based economy to be distinguished from another? This essay proposes that the answer may lie in three directions: (1) in terms of the variety of knowledge that is engaged; (2) in terms of (...)
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    Internalist Virtues and Knowledge.Sarah Wright - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (2):119-132.
    What role can intellectual virtues play in an account of knowledge when we interpret those virtues internalistically, i.e., as depending only on internal states of the cognizer? Though it has been argued that internalist virtues are ill suited to play any role in an account of knowledge, I will show that, on the contrary, internalist virtues can play an important role in recent accounts of knowledge developed to utilize externalist virtues. The virtue account of knowledge developed (...)
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  25. Intuition as a Basic Source of Moral Knowledge.Thomas W. Smythe & Thomas G. Evans - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (2):233-247.
    The idea that intuition plays a basic role in moral knowledge and moral philosophy probably began in the eighteenth century. British philosophers such as Anthony Shaftsbury, Francis Hutcheson, Thomas Reid, and later David Hume talk about a “moral sense” that they place in John Locke’s theory of knowledge in terms of Lockean reflexive perceptions, while Richard Price seeks a faculty by which we obtain our ideas of right and wrong. In the twentieth century intuitionism in moral philosophy was (...)
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    Common Knowledge: Relating Anti-Founded Situation Semantics to Modal Logic Neighbourhood Semantics. [REVIEW]L. Lismont - 1994 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 3 (4):285-302.
    Two approaches for defining common knowledge coexist in the literature: the infinite iteration definition and the circular or fixed point one. In particular, an original modelization of the fixed point definition was proposed by Barwise in the context of a non-well-founded set theory and the infinite iteration approach has been technically analyzed within multi-modal epistemic logic using neighbourhood semantics by Lismont. This paper exhibits a relation between these two ways of modelling common knowledge which seem at first (...)
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    The Importance of Defining ‘Data’ in Data Management Policies: Commentary On: “Issues in Data Management”.Julie Richardson & Diane Hoffman-Kim - 2010 - Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):749-751.
    What comprises ‘data’ varies from one institution to another based on the information which is deemed important by individual institutions. To effectively and efficiently produce, collect, and retain data, an organization develops specific defining characteristics of data to meet its informational needs. Procedures to maintain and retain knowledge among laboratory members and principal investigators will allow for improved efficiency of data collection. Optimization of communication, maintenance of inventories, record keeping, and updating relevant training programs are all critical to (...)
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    Knowledge Claims and the Governance of Agri-Food Innovation.Richard Philip Lee - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (1):79-91.
    In this paper I examine how knowledge claims operating through two types of governance techniques can guide product innovations in the agri-food sector. The notion that knowledge claims have strong social and material components informs the analysis undertaken, developed through a discussion of social science approaches to the role of human groups and biophysical properties in social change. I apply this socio-technical perspective to two case studies: defining dietary fiber and reducing saturated fat. The first involves attempts (...)
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  29. Self-Knowledge: A Study of Sartre and Hampshire.David A. Jopling - 1988 - Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;This work examines some of the epistemological and ontological conditions of the deep self-knowledge that is demanded by the Delphic motto gnothi seauton . The guiding questions are: what is the 'self' that deep self-knowledge is of? What are we such that we can ask deep and puzzling questions about our life-plans, our self-conceptions and the meaning of our lives? Can we know ourselves as we really (...)
     
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    Is Justified True Behavior Knowledge?.Frank Hammonds - 2010 - Behavior and Philosophy 38:49-59.
    Edmund Gettier (1963) argued against defining knowledge as justified true belief. Using two examples, he demonstrated that (a) believing a proposition to be true, (b) having justification for that belief, and (c) the proposition in fact being true, do not constitute sufficient conditions for one to be said to know the proposition. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the utility of a behavioral definition of justified true belief. I will define “justified,” “true,” and “belief” in behavioral (...)
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  31.  12
    Chisholm on Knowledge.S. Shuger - 1979 - Philosophical Studies 35 (4):413 - 419.
    Roderick chisholm has produced many of the most vigorous and enlightening treatments of the problem of defining knowledge. In the second edition of his "theory of knowledge", Chisholm has once again attempted to define knowledge. In this paper, I argue that his definition is too weak and hence should be rejected.
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  32. The Usefulness of Substances. Knowledge, Science and Metaphysics in Nietzsche and Mach.Pietro Gori - 2009 - Nietzsche Studien 38:111-155.
    In this paper I discuss the role played by Ernst Mach on Nietzsche’s thought. Starting from the contents of his Beiträge zur Analyse der Empfindungen, I’ll show the close similarities between their view on both human knowledge and the scientific world description. In his writing on science Nietzsche shares Mach’s critique to the 19th century mechanism and its metaphysical ground, as much as his way of defining the substantial notions such as matter, ego and free will. Moreover, my (...)
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  33. Constructivism About Practical Knowledge.Carla Bagnoli - 2013 - In Constructivism in Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 153-182.
    It is largely agreed that if constructivism contributes anything to meta-ethics it is by proposing that we understand ethical objectivity “in terms of a suitably constructed point of view that all can accept” (Rawls 1980/1999: 307). Constructivists defend this “practical” conception of objectivity in contrast to the realist or “ontological” conception of objectivity, understood as an accurate representation of an independent metaphysical order. Because of their objectivist but not realist commitments, Kantian constructivists place their theory “somewhere in the space between (...)
     
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  34.  9
    Defining and Categorizing Outcomes of Moral Case Deliberation : Concept Mapping with Experienced MCD Participants.Janine C. de Snoo-Trimp, Bert Molewijk & Henrica C. W. de Vet - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):88.
    Background To support healthcare professionals in dealing with ethically difficult situations, Clinical Ethics Support services like Moral Case Deliberation are increasingly implemented. To assess the impact of CES, it is important to evaluate outcomes. Despite general claims about outcomes from MCD experts and some qualitative research, there exists no conceptual analysis of outcomes yet. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically define and categorize MCD outcomes. An additional aim was to compare these outcomes with the outcomes in the (...)
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    Moral Schemas and Tacit Judgement or How the Defining Issues Test is Supported by Cognitive Science.Darcia Narvaez & Tonia Bock - 2002 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (3):297-314.
    Ideas from cognitive science are increasingly influential and provide insight into the nature of moral judgement. Three core ideas are discussed: modern schema theory, the frequency of automatic decision-making and implicit processes as the default mode of human information processing. The Defining Issues Test (DIT) measures the beginnings of moral understanding, which are largely non-verbal and intuitive, in contrast to the Moral Judgement Interview (MJI), which measures the highest level of verbal understanding. The positive attributes of the DIT and (...)
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  36. Common Knowledge and Argumentation Schemes .Fabrizio Macagno & Douglas Walton - 2005 - Studies in Communication Sciences 5 (2):1-22.
    We argue that common knowledge, of the kind used in reasoning in law and computing is best analyzed using a dialogue model of argumentation (Walton & Krabbe 1995). In this model, implicit premises resting on common knowledge are analyzed as endoxa or widely accepted opinions and generalizations (Tardini 2005). We argue that, in this sense, common knowledge is not really knowledge of the kind represent by belief and/or knowledge of the epistemic kind studied in current (...)
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  37.  46
    Sharing Responsibility in Gamete Donation: Balancing Relations and New Knowledge in Latvia.Signe Mezinska, Ilze Mileiko & Aivita Putnina - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):185-196.
    PurposeThis paper presents an ethnographic study of gamete donation in Latvia. The aim of the study is to describe and analyse the practice of applying responsibility in gamete donation cases from the perspective of anthropology and ethics.MethodsWe performed thirty semi-structured interviews with laypeople and five focus group discussions among adolescents. The third source of data was media analysis: 57 articles discussing assisted reproduction in Latvian electronic popular media as well as internet discussions among ART participants. The data were processed using (...)
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  38. The Methodological Approach to Argument Evaluation: Rules of Defining as Applied to Assessing Arguments.Marcin Koszowy - 2013 - Filozofia Nauki 21 (1).
    The main thesis underlying the methodological approach to argument evaluation holds that some arguments which employ knowledge-gaining procedures can be suc-cessfully evaluated by applying tools elaborated by the methodology of science, such as the rules for reasoning, classifying objects, defining, and questioning. The applica-tion of those rules to argument evaluation consists in comparing them with proce-dures employed in the case of argumentative practices performed either in scientific inquiry or in everyday life. In order to show how building the (...)
     
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  39.  11
    Mode 2 Knowledge Production in the Context of Medical Research: A Call for Further Clarifications.Hojjat Soofi - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (1):23-27.
    The traditional researcher-driven environment of medical knowledge production is losing its dominance with the expansion of, for instance, community-based participatory or participant-led medical research. Over the past few decades, sociologists of science have debated a shift in the production of knowledge from traditional discipline-based to more socially embedded and transdisciplinary frameworks. Recently, scholars have tried to show the relevance of Mode 2 knowledge production to medical research. However, the existing literature lacks detailed clarifications on how a model (...)
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    Inductive Knowledge.Alexander Bird - 2009 - In D. Pritchard (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Epistemology. Routledge.
    The first obstacle that confronts the student of induction is that of defining the subject matter. One initial point is to note that much of the relevant subject matter goes under the description ‘the theory of confirmation’. The distinction is primarily that the study of induction concerns inference, i.e. cases where one takes the conclusion to be established by the evidence, whereas confirmation concerns the weight of evidence, which one may take to be something like the credibility of a (...)
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  41. Defining Democratic Decision Making.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2011 - In Frans Svensson & Rysiek Silwinski (eds.), Neither/Nor - Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Erik Carlson on the Occasion of His Fiftieth Birthday. Uppsala: Uppsala Philosophical Studies. pp. 13-29.
    In his Populist Democracy: A Defence (1993), Torbjörn Tännsjö suggests, roughly, the following necessary and sufficient conditions for a democratic collective choice: If the majority of a given group of voters prefer A to B, then the collective choice is A rather than B; and if the majority of voters had preferred B to A, then the collective choice would have been B rather than A. Moreover, the preference of a voter is equated with the one she is showing by (...)
     
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  42.  49
    Defining the Limits of Emergency Humanitarian Action: Where, and How, to Draw the Line?N. Ford, R. Zachariah, E. Mills & R. Upshur - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):68-71.
    Decisions about targeting medical assistance in humanitarian contexts are fraught with dilemmas ranging from non-availability of basic services, to massive demographic and epidemiological shifts, and to the threat of insecurity and evacuations. Aid agencies are obliged, due to capacity constraints and competing priorities, to clearly define the objectives and the beneficiaries of their actions. That aid agencies have to set limits to their actions is not controversial, but the process of defining the limits raises ethical questions. In MSF, frameworks (...)
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  43.  1
    Sharing Responsibility in Gamete Donation: Balancing Relations and New Knowledge in Latvia.Signe Mezinska, Ilze Mileiko & Aivita Putnina - 2012 - Medicine Studies 3 (3):185-196.
    PurposeThis paper presents an ethnographic study of gamete donation in Latvia. The aim of the study is to describe and analyse the practice of applying responsibility in gamete donation cases from the perspective of anthropology and ethics.MethodsWe performed thirty semi-structured interviews with laypeople and five focus group discussions among adolescents. The third source of data was media analysis: 57 articles discussing assisted reproduction in Latvian electronic popular media as well as internet discussions among ART participants. The data were processed using (...)
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    Knowledge as Justified Belief, Period.Jerry H. Gill - 1985 - International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (4):381-391.
    A critique of the standard definition of knowledge as "justified, True belief" on the grounds that since truth, As judged by human knowers, Is a function of the process of justifying beliefs, It is superfluous as a defining characteristic of knowledge. The works of william james and j l austin are drawn on.
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    Operationalization of Patients’ Rights in Sudan: Quantifying Nurses’ Knowledge.Salma M. Abdalla, Esra A. A. Mahgoub, Jihad Abdelgadir, Nahla Elhassan & Zulfa Omer - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2239-2246.
    Background: Promoting patients’ rights is essential for defining the standards of clinical services within a country. Given their responsibilities, nurses can be the primary target for research to investigate the issue of patients’ rights within a healthcare system. As such, assessing the knowledge of nurses about patients’ rights is an essential step toward improving the quality of healthcare in limited resource settings like Sudan. Objectives: We aimed to assess the level of knowledge about patients’ rights among the (...)
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  46. Chaos and Reliable Knowledge.Maralee Harrell - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Most of the recent work in chaos theory has been the development of data analysis tools for analyzing chaotic data. It is based upon the results of the application of these tools that many researchers have made claims that such phenomena as heartbeats, planetary orbits, and chemical reactions are chaotic. ;The first part of my dissertation is concerned with investigating the standard methods that are used to determine whether a system is chaotic, and the requirements of these methods. I begin (...)
     
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  47.  6
    Analyzing Knowledge Retrieval Impairments Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Using Network Analyses.Jeffrey C. Zemla & Joseph L. Austerweil - 2019 - Complexity 2019:1-12.
    A defining characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease is difficulty in retrieving semantic memories, or memories encoding facts and knowledge. While it has been suggested that this impairment is caused by a degradation of the semantic store, the precise ways in which the semantic store is degraded are not well understood. Using a longitudinal corpus of semantic fluency data, we derive semantic network representations of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and of healthy controls. We contrast our network-based approach with analyzing fluency (...)
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    Measuring Interdisciplinary Research Categories and Knowledge Transfer: A Case Study of Connections Between Cognitive Science and Education.Alan L. Porter, Stephen F. Carley, Caitlin Cassidy, Jan Youtie, David J. Schoeneck, Seokbeom Kwon & Gregg E. A. Solomon - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (4):582-618.
    This is a “bottom-up” paper in the sense that it draws lessons in defining disciplinary categories under study from a series of empirical studies of interdisciplinarity. In particular, we are in the process of studying the interchange of research-based knowledge between Cognitive Science and Educational Research. This has posed a set of design decisions that we believe warrant consideration as others study cross-disciplinary research processes.
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    Logic, Rationality and Knowledge in Ramsey's Thought: Reassessing 'Human Logic'.Marion Gaspard - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (2):139-157.
    This paper reconsiders Frank Ramsey's essay on subjective probability (1926) as a consistent way to articulate logic, rationality and knowledge. The first part of the essay builds an axiomatic theory of subjective probability based on ‘formal logic’, defining rationality as choice-consistency. The second part seems to open up different horizons: the evaluation of degrees of belief by ‘human logic’. Because of the interest Keynes (1931) had taken in ‘human logic’, it was considered to be a possible alternative to (...)
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    About the Unity of Power, Knowledge, Communication in M. Fuco’s “Archeological Search”.L. M. Demchenko - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:37-44.
    Mishel Fuco not only influenced the consciousness of modern West, but changed the modus of thinking, the way of perception of many traditional notions, transformed the opinions about the reality, history, person. Philosopher’s principle research programme which attaches the entirety to his works is “archeology of knowledge” programme, the search of human knowledge’s original layers. Let us mark that all Fuco’s works in 1960s are devoted to main aim: to clear up the conditions of historical origin of different (...)
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