Results for 'Delia Wolf'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  6
    Incorporating Ethical Principles Into Clinical Research Protocols: A Tool for Protocol Writers and Ethics Committees.Rebecca H. Li, Mary C. Wacholtz, Mark Barnes, Liam Boggs, Susan Callery-D'Amico, Amy Davis, Alla Digilova, David Forster, Kate Heffernan, Maeve Luthin, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Lindsay McNair, Jennifer E. Miller, Jacquelyn Murphy, Luann Van Campen, Mark Wilenzick, Delia Wolf, Cris Woolston, Carmen Aldinger & Barbara E. Bierer - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):229-234.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  67
    Book Reviews: Jean Grondin, Paul Ricoeur_, Paris: PUF, 2013 (Luca M. Possati); François Dosse Et Catherine Goldenstein (Éds.), _Paul Ricoeur : Penser la Mémoire_, Paris, Seuil, 2013 (Aurore Dumont); Gert-Jan van der Heiden, _The Truth (and Untruth) of Language. Heidegger, Ricoeur and Derrida on Disclosure and Displacement_, Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press (Paul-Gabriel Sandu); Marc-Antoine Vallée, _Gadamer Et Ricoeur. La Conception Herméneutique du Langage_, Rennes, Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2012, Coll. «Philosophica»,(Paul Marinescu); Saulius Geniusas, _The Origins of the Horizon in Husserl's Phenomenology_, Dordrecht: Springer, Series: Contributions to Phenomenology, Vol. 67, 2012 (Witold Płotka); Annabelle Dufourcq, _La Dimension Imaginaire du Réel Dans la Philosophie de Husserl_, Dordrecht: Springer, 2011, Coll.: _Phaenomenologica_ 198 (Delia Popa); Denis Seron, _Ce Que Voir Veut Dire. Essai Sur la Perception, Paris: Éditions du Cerf, 2012 (Maria Gyemant); Hans Frie. [REVIEW]Luca M. Possati, Aurore Dumont, Paul-Gabriel Sandu, Paul Marinescu, Witold Płotka, Delia Popa, Maria Gyemant, Christian Ferencz-Flatz, Bogdan Mincă, Denisa Butnaru, Ovidiu Stanciu & Mădălina Diaconu - 2013 - Studia Phaenomenologica 13:469-508.
    Luca M. Possati, Jean Grondin, Paul Ricoeur ; Aurore Dumont, François Dosse et Catherine Goldenstein, Paul Ricoeur: penser la mémoire ; Paul-Gabriel Sandu, Gert-Jan van der Heiden, The Truth of Language. Heidegger, Ricoeur and Derrida on Disclosure and Displacement ; Paul Marinescu, Marc-Antoine Vallée, Gadamer et Ricoeur. La conception herméneutiquedu langage ; Witold Płotka, Saulius Geniusas, Th e Origins of the Horizon in Husserl’s Phenomenology ; Delia Popa, Annabelle Dufourcq, La dimension imaginaire du réel dans la philosophie de Husserl (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Names Are Predicates.Delia Graff Fara - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (1):59-117.
    One reason to think that names have a predicate-type semantic value is that they naturally occur in count-noun positions: ‘The Michaels in my building both lost their keys’; ‘I know one incredibly sharp Cecil and one that's incredibly dull’. Predicativism is the view that names uniformly occur as predicates. Predicativism flies in the face of the widely accepted view that names in argument position are referential, whether that be Millian Referentialism, direct-reference theories, or even Fregean Descriptivism. But names are predicates (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   68 citations  
  4. Ioana iancu Delia Cristina Balaban.Delia Cristina Balaban - 2009 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (24):151-167.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Shifting Sands: An Interest Relative Theory of Vagueness.Delia Graff Fara - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28 (1):45--81.
    I propose that the meanings of vague expressions render the truth conditions of utterances of sentences containing them sensitive to our interests. For example, 'expensive' is analyzed as meaning 'costs a lot', which in turn is analyzed as meaning 'costs significantly greater than the norm'. Whether a difference is a significant difference depends on what our interests are. Appeal to the proposal is shown to provide an attractive resolution of the sorites paradox that is compatible with classical logic and semantics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  6.  38
    Descriptions as Predicates.Delia Graff Fara - 2015 - Philosophical Review 124 (1):59--117.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  7.  22
    Wolf Prolegomena to Homer, 1795. Trans, with Introd. And Notes by A. Grafton, G. W. Most, and J. E. G. Zetzcl. Princeton: University Press, 1985. Pp. Xiv + 265. £30.20. [REVIEW]M. D. Reeve, F. A. Wolf, A. Grafton, G. W. Most & J. E. G. Zetzel - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:219-221.
  8. Freedom Within Reason.Susan Wolf - 1990 - Oup Usa.
    In Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf charts a course between incompatibilism, or the notion that freedom and responsibility require causal and metaphysical independence from the impersonal forces of nature, and compatibilism, or the notion that people are free and responsible as long as their actions are governed by their desires. Wolf argues that some of the forces which are beyond our control are friends to freedom rather than enemies of it, enabling us to see the world for what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   213 citations  
  9.  66
    Shifting Sands: An Interest-Relative Theory of Vagueness.Delia Graff - 2000 - Philosophical Topics 28:45-82.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  10. Specifying Desires.Delia Graff Fara - 2013 - Noûs 47 (2):250-272.
    A report of a person's desire can be true even if its embedded clause underspecifies the content of the desire that makes the report true. It is true that Fiona wants to catch a fish even if she has no desire that is satisfied if she catches a poisoned minnow. Her desire is satisfied only if she catches an edible, meal-sized fish. The content of her desire is more specific than the propositional content of the embedded clause in our true (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  11. Phenomenal Continua and the Sorites.Delia Graff Fara - 2001 - Mind 110 (440):905-935.
    I argue that, contrary to widespread philosophical opinion, phenomenal indiscriminability is transitive. For if it were not transitive, we would be precluded from accepting the truisms that if two things look the same then the way they look is the same and that if two things look the same then if one looks red, so does the other. Nevertheless, it has seemed obvious to many philosophers (e.g. Goodman, Armstrong and Dummett) that phenomenal indiscriminability is not transitive; and, moreover, that this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  12. You Can Call Me 'Stupid', ... Just Don't Call Me Stupid.Delia Graff Fara - 2011 - Analysis 71 (3):492-501.
    In this paper I argue that names are predicates when they occur in the appellation position of 'called'-predications. This includes not only proper names, but all names -- including quote-names of proper names and quote-names of other words or phrases. Thus in "You can call me Al", the proper name 'Al' is a predicate. And in "You can call me 'Al'," the quote-name of 'Al' -- namely ' 'Al' ' -- is also a predicate.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  13. Dear Haecceitism.Delia Graff Fara - 2009 - Erkenntnis 70 (3):285–297.
    If a counterpart theorist’s understanding of the counterpart relation precludes haecceitist differences between possible worlds, as David Lewis’s does, how can he admit haecceitist possibilities, as Lewis wants to? Lewis (Philosophical Review 3–32, 1983; On the Plurality of Worlds, 1986) devised what he called a ‘cheap substitute for haecceitism,’ which would allow for haecceitist possibilities while preserving the counterpart relation as a purely qualitative one. The solution involved lifting an earlier (Journal of Philosophy 65(5):113–126, 1968; 68(7):203–211, 1971) ban on there (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  14. A Problem for Predicativism Solved by Predicativism.Delia Graff Fara - 2015 - Analysis 75 (3):362-370.
    Consider the following sentences: In every race, the colt won; In every race, John won.John Hawthorne and David Manley say that the difference between these two sentences raises a problem for Predicativism about names. According to the currently more standard version of Predicativism, a bare singular name in argument position, like ‘John’ in , is embedded in a definite description with an unpronounced definite article. The problem is supposed to be that permits a covarying reading that allows for different races (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  15. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Markus Rüther).Susan Wolf - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   100 citations  
  16. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  17.  98
    Descriptions As Predicates.Delia Graff - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 102 (1):1-42.
    Although Strawson’s main aim in “On Referring” was to argue that definite descriptions can be used referentially – that is, “to mention or refer to some individual person or single object . . . , in the course of doing what we should normally describe as making a statement about that person [or] object” (1950, p. 320) – he denied that definite descriptions are always used referentially. The description in ‘Napoleon was the greatest French soldier’ is not used referentially, says (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  18.  30
    Adolescence as a Sensitive Period of Brain Development.Delia Fuhrmann, Lisa J. Knoll & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):558-566.
  19. Moral Saints.Susan Wolf - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):419-439.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   251 citations  
  20. Relative-Sameness Counterpart Theory.Delia Graff Fara - 2008 - Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (2):167-189.
    Here I propose a coherent way of preserving the identity of material objects with the matter that constitutes them. The presentation is formal, and intended for RSL. An informal presentation is in preliminary draft! -/- Relative-sameness relations—such as being the same person as—are like David Lewis's "counterpart" relations in the following respects: (i) they may hold between objects that aren't identical (I propose), and (ii) there are a multiplicity of them, different ones of which may be variously invoked in different (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  21. Socratizing.Delia Graff Fara - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterlly 48 (3):229-238.
    In this paper I trace Quine's early development of his treatment of names, first as abbreviations for definite descriptions with "Frege-Rusell" style substantive content, then as abbreviations for definite descriptions containing simple predicative content, through to a treatment of names themselves as predicates rather than as abbreviations for this or that type of more complex expression. Along the way, I explain why—despite ubiquitous claims and suggestions to the contrary—Quine never actually uses the verbized name "Socratizes".
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  22. Verbalism and Metalinguistic Negotiation in Ontological Disputes.Delia Belleri - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (9):2211-2226.
    The aim of this paper is to explore the view that some ontological disputes are “metalinguistic negotiations”, and to make sense of the significance of these controversies in a way that is still compatible with a broadly deflationist approach. I start by considering the view advocated by Eli Hirsch to the effect that some ontological disputes are verbal. I take the Endurantism–Perdurantusm dispute as a case-study and argue that, while it can be conceded that the dispute is verbal at the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. 'Literal' Uses of Proper Names.Delia Graff Fara - manuscript
  24. Descriptions with Adverbs of Quantification.Delia Graff Fara - 2006 - Philosophical Issues 16 (1):65–87.
    In “Descriptions as Predicates” (Fara 2001) I argued that definite and indefinite descriptions should be given a uniform semantic treatment as predicates rather than as quantifier phrases. The aim of the current paper is to clarify and elaborate one of the arguments for the descriptions-aspredicates view, one that concerns the interaction of descriptions with adverbs of quantification.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  25.  56
    Two Species of Merely Verbal Disputes.Delia Belleri - 2018 - Metaphilosophy 49 (5):691-710.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Towards a Unified Notion of Disagreement.Delia Belleri & Michele Palmira - 2013 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 88 (1):139-159.
    The recent debate on Semantic Contextualism and Relativism has definitely brought the phenomenon of disagreement under the spotlight. Relativists have considered disagreement as a means to accomplish a defence of their own position regarding the semantics of knowledge attributions, epistemic modals, taste predicates, and so on. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, we argue that several specific notions of disagreement can be subsumed under a common “schema” which provides a unified and overarching notion of disagreement. Secondly, we avail (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. Profiling Interest Relativity.Delia Graff Fara - 2008 - Analysis 68 (4):326-335.
    Draft (Version 1.1, October 2007): (PDF file) A reply to Jason Stanley’s Analysis criticism of my interest-relative view on vagueness.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. Possibility Relative to a Sortal.Delia Graff Fara - 2012 - In Karen Bennett & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, volume 7. Oxford University Press. pp. 1.
    This paper is an informal presentation of the ideas presented formally in ”Relative-Sameness Counterpart Theory”. Relative-sameness relations -- such as being the same person as -- are like David Lewis’s “counterpart” relations in the following respects: (i) they may hold over time or across worlds between objects that aren’t cross-time or cross-world identical (I propose), and (ii) there are a multiplicity of them, different ones of which may be variously invoked in different contexts. They differ from his counterpart relations, however, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29. Profiling Interest Relativity.Delia Graff Fara - 2008 - Analysis 68 (4):326-335.
  30. Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf.Frieder Otto Wolf & Murn - 2016 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This humanism compels (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  38
    Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf.Frieder Otto Wolf & Murn - 2016 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    Prof. Dr. Frieder Otto Wolf, President of the Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands, provides an overview of the main currents of modern humanism in Germany. He describes the central stream of German humanism as practical, in that it combines the principled imperative to overcome all structures and situations in which people are not treated as human beings with seeking to widen the horizons of humane existence in the arts and sciences and in capabilities of leading a fulfilling life. This humanism compels (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Vagueness.Delia Graff & Timothy Williamson (eds.) - 1994 - Ashgate.
    If you’ve read the first five hundred pages of this book, you’ve read most of it (we assume that ‘most’ requires more than ‘more than half’). The set of natural numbers n such that the first n pages are most of this book is nonempty. Therefore, by the least number principle, it has a least member k. What is k? We do not know. We have no idea how to find out. The obstacle is something about the term ‘most’. It (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33.  11
    The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love.Susan Wolf - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    For over thirty years Susan Wolf has been writing about moral and nonmoral values and the relation between them. This volume collects Wolf's most important essays on the topics of morality, love, and meaning, ranging from her classic essay "Moral Saints" to her most recent "The Importance of Love.".
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  34. Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility.Susan Wolf - 1987 - In Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.), Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 46-62.
    My strategy is to examine a recent trend in philosophical discussions of responsibility, a trend that tries, but I think ultimately fails, to give an acceptable analysis of the conditions of responsibility. It fails due to what at first appear to be deep and irresolvable metaphysical problems. It is here that I suggest that the condition of sanity comes to the rescue. What at first appears to be an impossible requirement for responsibility---the requirement that the responsible agent have created her- (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  35. Scope Confusions and Unsatisfiable Disjuncts: Two Problems for Supervaluationism.Delia Graff Fara - 2010 - In Richard Dietz & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), (2010) ‘Scope Confusions and Unsatisfiable Disjuncts: Two Problems for Supervaluation- ism’, in eds., Cuts and Clouds: Vaguenesss, Its Nature, and Its Logic,. Oxford University Press.
  36. Desires, Scope, and Tense.Fara Delia Graff - 2003 - Philosophical Perspectives 17 (1):141-163.
    According to James McCawley (1981) and Richard Larson and Gabriel Segal (1995), the following sentence is three-ways ambiguous: -/- Harry wants to be the mayor of Kenai. -/- According to them also, the three-way ambiguity cannot be accommodated on the Russellian view that definite descriptions are quantified noun phrases. In order to capture the three-way ambiguity of the sentence, these authors propose that definite descriptions must be ambiguous: sometimes they are predicate expressions; sometimes they are Russellian quantified noun phrases. After (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  37. Disagreement and Dispute.Delia Belleri - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (2):289-307.
    In this paper, I will trace a distinction between two different ways of thinking about doxastic conflicts. The first way emphasises what is going on at the level of semantics, when two subjects disagree by uttering certain sentences or accepting certain contents. The second way emphasises some aspects that are epistemic in kind, which concern what subjects are rationally required to do whenever they disagree with someone. The semantics-oriented and epistemically-oriented notions will serve for the purpose of assessing some aspects (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Truth in a Region.Delia Graff Fara - 2011 - In Paul Egre & Nathan Klinedinst (eds.), Vagueness and Language Use. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this paper I criticize a version of supervaluation semantics. This version is called "Region-Valuation" semantics. It's developed by Pablo Cobreros. I argue that all supervaluationists, regionalists in particular, and truth-value gap theorists of vagueness more generally, are commited to the validity of D-intro, the principle that every sentence entails its definitization (the truth of "Paul is tall" guarantees the truth of "Paul is definitely tall"). The principle embroils one in a paradox that's distinct from, but related to, the sorites (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39. Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  40.  57
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  41. A History of Science, Technology, and Philosophy in the 16th & 17th Centuries, by A. Wolf with the Co-Operation of F. Dannemann and A. Armitage. [REVIEW]A. Wolf - 1935 - Harper.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. A History of Science, Technology, and Philosopy in the Eighteenth Century by A. Wolf.A. Wolf - 1938 - London: G. Allen & Unwin.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  6
    Humanism and Public Policy in Germany: The Point Is to Change the World Interview with Frieder Otto Wolf.Wolf Frieder Otto & Murn Charles - 2016 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 24 (2):177-186.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  12
    "Perceptual and Memorial Constructs in Children's Judgments of Quantity: A Law of Across-Representation Invariance": Correction to Wolf and Algom.Yuval Wolf & Daniel Algom - 1988 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 117 (1):50-50.
  45. Asymmetrical Freedom.Susan Wolf - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 77 (March):151-66.
  46.  49
    You Can Say What You Think: Vindicating the Effability of Our Thoughts.Delia Belleri - 2014 - Synthese 191 (18):4431-4450.
    The thesis of Ineffability has it that no proposition can be fully expressed by a sentence, this meaning that no sentence-type, or even sentence-token whose indexicality and ambiguities have been resolved, can fully encode a proposition. The thesis of the propositionality of thoughts has it that thoughts are propositional. An implication of the joint endorsement of these two theses is that thoughts are ineffable. The aim of this paper is to argue that this is not the case: there are effable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  95
    Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  48. Good-for-Nothings.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  49.  2
    Students’ and Supervisors’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Plagiarism and Referencing.Delia Grace & Johanna F. Lindahl - 2018 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 3 (1).
    BackgroundReferencing is an integral part of scientific writing and professional research conduct that requires appropriate acknowledgement of others’ work and avoidance of plagiarism. University students should understand and apply this as part of their academic development, but for this, it is essential that supervisors also display proper research integrity and support.MethodsThis study used an online educative questionnaire to understand the knowledge and attitudes of students and supervisors at two institutes in Europe and Africa. The results were then used to create (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  15
    Moral Saints.Susan Wolf - 1982 - In Roger Crisp & Michael Slote (eds.), Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000