Results for 'Deliberation, Consent, What Questions, Planning, What-To-Do Questions, Bernard Lonergan'

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  1.  29
    'What-To-Do?': The Heart of Lonergan's Ethics.Philip McShane - 2012 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:69-93.
    Philip McShane explores the implications of Bernard Lonergan’s compacted account of ‘what questions’ and ‘what-to-do questions’ for understanding deliberation. The essay provides a fascinating and instructive glimpse into McShane’s own long-continued struggle and dialogue with Lonergan’s achievement.
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  2.  61
    Intentionality in Edmund Husserl and Bernard Lonergan.William F. J. Ryan - 1973 - International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (2):173-190.
    ALTHOUGH THERE is no direct dependence of Bernard Lonergan upon Edmund HusserI in the manner, say, of Husserl himself upon Franz Brentano, there are nonetheless points of similarity and contrast between them. It would be possible to list these matching points singly on their own, such as Epoche and self-appropriation, Erlebnis and consciousness, monad and subject, Anschauung and affirmation. However, besides and beneath these individual points of similarity and contrast, lying as their basis, there is similarity and contrast (...)
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  3.  23
    Drama and Conversion: Raymund Schwager's Dramatic Theology as an Exercise of Bernard Lonergan's Functional Specialty of Foundations.Nikolaus Wandinger - 2007 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 63 (4):1203 - 1222.
    Raymund Schwager SJ suggested a dramatic way of looking at the Christ event, as recorded in the New Testament, in order to clarify the meaning of it and provide a coherent picture. Bernard Lonergan SJ developed a theological methodology for our day. In this article, the author tries to determine how Schwager's approach relates to Lonergan's methodology. He wants to investigate the question: what functional specialty is Schwager engaged in in his main work? The answer shall (...)
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  4.  13
    What We Believe Is Not Always What We Do: An Empirical Investigation Into Ethically Questionable Behavior in Consumption. [REVIEW]Kyoko Fukukawa & Christine Ennew - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):49 - 60.
    This article presents the results of an empirical study which argues that ethical judgment is not sufficient, by itself, to explain ethically questionable behavior in consumption. The study adopts Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior and presents results from a self-completion survey questionnaire covering five scenarios describing ethical consumer dilemmas. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess measurement structures, and the proposed model was estimated using logistic regression. Three antecedents, namely Social Norm (an extension of the construct of Subjective Norm), Perceived (...)
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  5.  65
    John Polkinghorne and Bernard Lonergan on the Scientific Status of Theology.Edward M. Hogan - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):558-582.
    On the basis of his acquaintance with theoretical elementary particle physics, and following the lead of Thomas Torrance, John Polkinghorne maintains that the data upon which a science is based, and the method by which it treats those data, must respect the idiosyncratic nature of the object with which the science is concerned. Polkinghorne calls this the "accommodation" (or "conformity") of a discipline to its object. The question then arises: What should we expect religious experience and theological method to (...)
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  6. Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do About It.Max H. Bazerman & Ann E. Tenbrunsel - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    When confronted with an ethical dilemma, most of us like to think we would stand up for our principles. But we are not as ethical as we think we are. In Blind Spots, leading business ethicists Max Bazerman and Ann Tenbrunsel examine the ways we overestimate our ability to do what is right and how we act unethically without meaning to. From the collapse of Enron and corruption in the tobacco industry, to sales of the defective Ford Pinto, the (...)
     
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  7. Blind Spots: Why We Fail to Do What's Right and What to Do About It.Max H. Bazerman & Ann E. Tenbrunsel - 2011 - Princeton University Press.
    When confronted with an ethical dilemma, most of us like to think we would stand up for our principles. But we are not as ethical as we think we are. In Blind Spots, leading business ethicists Max Bazerman and Ann Tenbrunsel examine the ways we overestimate our ability to do what is right and how we act unethically without meaning to. From the collapse of Enron and corruption in the tobacco industry, to sales of the defective Ford Pinto, the (...)
     
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  8.  82
    Bernard Lonergan on Affirmation of the Existence of God.Paul St Amour - 2010 - Analecta Hermeneutica 2.
    In three parts, this paper seeks 1) to provide a synopsis of Bernard Lonergan‟s proof for the existence of God as presented in chapter nineteen of Insight, 2) to explain how Lonergan later came to critique his approach in Insight 19 in light of subsequent philosophical developments, and 3) to assess the ongoing relevance of Lonergan‟s Insight 19 argument given that aforementioned critique.The issues discussed in this paper are important for a variety of reasons.First, Lonergan‟s (...)
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  9.  28
    International Society: What is the Best We Can Do?Michael Walzer - 1999 - Ethical Perspectives 6 (3):201-210.
    I finished the first draft of this lecture just before the NATO bombing campaign against Serbia began — a campaign that provides, I think, a prime example of the failure of international society. A double failure in this case: its political agencies were not able to respond in a timely fashion to the disaster of the former Yugoslavia, and then they were not able to find a more effective form of military intervention. The problem both times wasn't one of organization (...)
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  10.  12
    Planning Routine Computing Tasks: Understanding What to Do.Suzanne M. Mannes & Walter Kintsch - 1991 - Cognitive Science 15 (3):305-342.
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  11.  72
    Lonergan's Ethics and Feminist Ethics: Exploring the Meaning of Care.Alessandra Gillis - 2012 - Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:27-43.
    Over the past thirty-odd years, the feminist contribution of the ethic of care has changed the way in which scholars and ‘lay people’ think about and approach ethical practices in our contemporary society. These changes are important in two significant ways. First, the contribution of feminist work to the body of ethics as a whole is a valuable addition. Second, by drawing attention to the concrete context of moral decision-making, particularly the notion of care, feminist scholars have opened the door (...)
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  12.  35
    A Concise Guide to Clinical Reasoning.Patrick Daly - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):966-972.
    What constitutes clinical reasoning is a disputed subject regarding the processes underlying accurate diagnosis, the importance of patient‐specific versus population‐based data, and the relation between virtue and expertise in clinical practice. In this paper, I present a model of clinical reasoning that identifies and integrates the processes of diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic decision making. The model is based on the generalized empirical method of Bernard Lonergan, which approaches inquiry with equal attention to the subject who investigates and (...)
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  13.  17
    What Do Patients Really Want to Know in an Informed Consent Procedure? A Questionnaire-Based Survey of Patients in the Bath Area, UK.H. El-Wakeel - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):612-616.
    Background: Medical decision making is based on patient autonomy and informed consent, which is an integral part of medical ethics, risk management and clinical governance. Consent to treatment has been extensively discussed, but the viewpoint of patients is not well represented. A new consent form was introduced by the Department of Health in 2001.Aims: To determine the information most important to patients, to facilitate evidence-based guidelines and to provide a valid and reliable consent-procedure-satisfaction questionnaire.Methods: An anonymous quantitative survey was carried (...)
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  14.  97
    Common Morality: Deciding What to Do.Bernard Gert - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral problems do not always come in the form of great social controversies. More often, the moral decisions we make are made quietly, constantly, and within the context of everyday activities and quotidian dilemmas. Indeed, these smaller decisions are based on a moral foundation that few of us ever stop to think about but which guides our every action. Here distinguished philosopher Bernard Gert presents a clear and concise introduction to what he calls "common morality" -- the moral (...)
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  15.  18
    Reversing Historical Skepticism: Bernard Lonergan on the Writing of History.Andrew Beards - 1994 - History and Theory 33 (2):198-219.
    The widespread influence of skeptical and relativist philosophies has led to an abandonment of empiricist accounts of objectivity in historical investigation. Can one do justice to the historical conditionedness of the historian without totally denying objectivity in historical judgments? This article introduces Bernard Lonergan's answer to this question. Lonergan contends that one can avoid both the Scylla of naive empiricism, fostering the myth of some simple backward gaze at the facts of the past, and the Charybdis of (...)
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  16.  32
    Knowing What to Do: Imagination, Virtue, and Platonism in Ethics.Timothy Chappell - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Chappell develops a picture of what philosophical ethics can be like, once set aside from conventional moral theory. His question is 'How are we to know what to do?', and the answer he defends is 'By developing our moral imaginations'--a key part of human excellence, which plays many roles in our practical and evaluative lives.
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  17.  6
    What Research Institutions Can Do to Foster Research Integrity.Lex Bouter - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (4):2363-2369.
    In many countries attention for fostering research integrity started with a misconduct case that got a lot of media exposure. But there is an emerging consensus that questionable research practices are more harmful due to their high prevalence. QRPs have in common that they can help to make study results more exciting, more positive and more statistically significant. That makes them tempting to engage in. Research institutions have the duty to empower their research staff to steer away from QRPs and (...)
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  18. The Feminist Question in Science: What Does It Mean to 'Do Social Science as a Feminist"?Alison Wylie - 2007 - In Sharlene Hesse-Biber (ed.), Handbook of Feminist Research. Sage Publications. pp. 567-578.
  19.  7
    What to Do About Religion: A Plan of Action.Alistair Sinclair - 2009 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 17 (2):35-42.
  20.  21
    Deliberation, Self-Conceptions, and Self-Improvement.Jonathan Jacobs - 1989 - Idealistic Studies 19:1.
    It is only for persons that the question, “How shall I live?” arises, and it arises inevitably, even if in an inarticulate and unreflective manner. Persons must deliberate, decide, plan, and schedule their actions. Openness with respect to ends confronts them, and they must structure and direct their lives by determining what sort of career to trace out, even if it proves to be a career of routine or unambitious undertakings. Circumstances can constrain and compel, and the openness persons (...)
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  21.  12
    Introduction to Book Symposium on Bernard Gert's Common Morality: Deciding What to Do.Dean Cocking - 2005 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 7 (1).
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  22.  71
    How Do You Know That You Settled a Question?Tillmann Vierkant - 2015 - Philosophical Explorations 18 (2):199-211.
    It is commonly assumed in the philosophical literature that in order to acquire an intention, the agent has to settle a question of what to do in practical deliberation. Carruthers, P. has recently used this to argue that the acquisition of intentions can never be conscious even in cases where the agent asserts having the intention in inner speech. Because of that Carruthers also believes that knowledge of intentions even in first person cases is observational. This paper explores the (...)
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  23. What Questions Fascinate Me?" "What Do I Want to Know?Gregg Lambert - 2003 - Substance 32 (1):24.
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  24. Love: What's Sex Got to Do with It?Natasha McKeever - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):201-218.
    It is usually taken for granted that romantic relationships will be sexual, but it seems that there is no necessary reason for this, as it is possible for romantic relationships to not include sex. Indeed, sometimes sex is a part of a romantic relationship for only a relatively short period of it. Furthermore, scientific explanations of the link between sex and love don’t seem fully satisfying because they tell us only about the mechanics of sex, rather than its meaning or (...)
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  25.  55
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions (...)
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  26. What has Collective Wisdom to Do with Wisdom?Daniel Andler - forthcoming - In J. Elster & H. Landemore (eds.), Collective Wisdom. Cambridge Universuty Press.
    Conventional wisdom holds two seemingly opposed beliefs. One is that communities are often much better than individuals at dealing with certain situations or solving certain problems. The other is that crowds are usually, and some say always, at best as intelligent as their least intelligent members and at worst even less. Consistency would seem to be easily re-established by distinguishing between advanced, sophisticated social organizations which afford the supporting communities a high level of collective performance, and primitive, mob-like structures which (...)
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  27.  14
    What Outcomes Do Dutch Healthcare Professionals Perceive as Important Before Participation in Moral Case Deliberation?Janine de Snoo‐Trimp, Guy Widdershoven, Mia Svantesson, Riekie de Vet & Bert Molewijk - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (4):246-257.
    Background There has been little attention paid to research on the outcomes of clinical ethics support or critical reflection on what constitutes a good CES outcome. Understanding how CES users perceive the importance of CES outcomes can contribute to a better understanding, use of and normative reflection on CES outcomes. Objective To describe the perceptions of Dutch healthcare professionals on important outcomes of moral case deliberation, prior to MCD participation, and to compare results between respondents. Methods This mixed-methods study (...)
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  28. Knowing What We Can Do: Actions, Intentions, and the Construction of Phenomenal Experience.Dave Ward, Tom Roberts & Andy Clark - 2011 - Synthese 181 (3):375-394.
    How do questions concerning consciousness and phenomenal experience relate to, or interface with, questions concerning plans, knowledge and intentions? At least in the case of visual experience the relation, we shall argue, is tight. Visual perceptual experience, we shall argue, is fixed by an agent’s direct unmediated knowledge concerning her poise (or apparent poise) over a currently enabled action space. An action space, in this specific sense, is to be understood not as a fine-grained matrix of possibilities for bodily movement, (...)
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  29. What's a Theory to Do... With Seeing? Or Some Empirical Considerations for Observation and Theory.Daniel Gilman - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):287-309.
    Criticism of the observation/theory distinction generally supposes it to be an empirical fact that even the most basic human perception is heavily theory-laden. I offer critical examination of experimental evidence cited by Thomas Kuhn and Paul Churchland on behalf of this supposition. I argue that the empirical evidence cited is inadequate support for the claims in question. I further argue that we have empirical grounds for claiming that the Kuhnian discussion of perception is developed within an inadequate conceptual framework and (...)
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  30.  30
    What Was to Be Demonstrated: A Reply to Christopher Tollefsen’s “No Problem”.Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (4):593-597.
    In his reply to my paper “The Problem with the Problem of the Embryo,” which appeared in the Summer 2008 issue of ACPQ, Christopher Tollefsen claims that I muddle matters by failing to keep distinct questions of biology from questions having to do with personhood; I have the science wrong in my account of the debate over the fact that the embryo depends on “maternal donation” for its development; and my so-called “counsel of pragmatism” is unlikely to lead to any (...)
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  31.  27
    What Ought I to Do?: Morality in Kant and Levinas.Catherine Chalier - 2002 - Cornell University Press.
    Is it possible to apply a theoretical approach to ethics? The French philosopher Catherine Chalier addresses this question with an unusual combination of traditional ethics and continental philosophy. In a powerful argument for the necessity of moral reflection, Chalier counters the notion that morality can be derived from theoretical knowledge. Chalier analyzes the positions of two great moral philosophers, Kant and Levinas. While both are critical of an ethics founded on knowledge, their criticisms spring from distinctly different points of view. (...)
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  32.  65
    Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.Bernard Williams - 2006 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline, Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates why (...)
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  33. 'System and History' in the Thought of Bernard Lonergan.Patrick D. Brown - 2000 - Dissertation, Boston College
    This study is a reading of Lonergan on "system and history," a topic central to his thought. The study begins by establishing two preliminary contexts. First, it constructs an overview of the problematic in chapter one. Second, it establishes a further context in chapter two by analyzing his writings on the topic in 1959, the year he gave a graduate seminar on "System and History." Subsequent chapters trace the emergence in the history of Lonergan's thought of historical heuristics, (...)
     
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  34.  12
    Grasping the Nettle--What to Do When Patients Withdraw Their Consent for Treatment: (A Clinical Perspective on the Case of Ms B).M. G. Tweeddale - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (4):236-237.
    Withdrawal of active treatment is common in medical practice, especially in critical care medicine. Usually, however, it involves patients who are unable to take part in the decision making process. As the case of Ms B shows, doctors are sometimes reluctant to withdraw active treatment when the patient is awake and requesting such a course of action. In theory, having a competent patient should facilitate clinical decision making, so where does the problem arise? It is argued that latent medical paternalism (...)
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  35.  85
    Deliberation, Reasons, and Alternatives.Justin Snedegar - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (3):682-702.
    A plausible constraint on normative reasons to act is that it must make sense to use them as premises in deliberation. I argue that a central sort of deliberation – what Bratman calls partial planning – is question-directed: it is over, and aims to resolve, deliberative questions. Whether it makes sense to use some consideration as a premise in deliberation in a case of partial planning can vary with the deliberative question at issue. I argue that the best explanation (...)
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  36.  53
    A Review of Bernard Gert’s Common Morality: Deciding What to Do. [REVIEW]Philip Stratton-Lake - 2006 - Teaching Ethics 7 (1):57-61.
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  37.  17
    Review of Bernard Gert, Common Morality: Deciding What to Do[REVIEW]Philip Stratton-Lake - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (6).
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  38. Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy.Bernard Williams - 2002 - Princeton University Press.
    What does it mean to be truthful? What role does truth play in our lives? What do we lose if we reject truthfulness? No philosopher is better suited to answer these questions than Bernard Williams. Writing with his characteristic combination of passion and elegant simplicity, he explores the value of truth and finds it to be both less and more than we might imagine.Modern culture exhibits two attitudes toward truth: suspicion of being deceived and skepticism that (...)
     
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  39.  30
    What's Love Got to Do with It?: Mapping Cynthia in Propertius' Paired Elegies 1.8 AB and 1.11-12.Sara H. Lindheim - 2011 - American Journal of Philology 132 (4):633-665.
    As he concludes poem 1.12, Propertius romantically asserts that Cynthia was prima and will be the finis. This article explores the supplemental readings that open up if we focus not on the temporal but on the geographical meaning of the word finis, a move invited by the poem itself and by the poems with which it belongs interpretively, all containing several allusions to space. Drawing on both Lacanian and cartographic theory, I suggest that the poet's engagement with questions of fines (...)
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  40.  69
    Risk and Motivation: When the Will is Required to Determine What to Do.Dylan Murray & Lara Buchak - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    Within philosophy of action, there are three broad views about what, in addition to beliefs, answer the question of “what to do?” and so determine an agent’s motivation: desires, judgments about values/reasons, or states of the will, such as intentions. We argue that recent work in decision theory vindicates the volitionalist. “What to do?” isn’t settled by “what do I value” or “what reasons are there?” Rational motivation further requires determining how to trade off the (...)
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  41. Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline.Bernard Williams - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (4):477-496.
    What can--and what can't--philosophy do? What are its ethical risks--and its possible rewards? How does it differ from science? In Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline , Bernard Williams addresses these questions and presents a striking vision of philosophy as fundamentally different from science in its aims and methods even though there is still in philosophy "something that counts as getting it right." Written with his distinctive combination of rigor, imagination, depth, and humanism, the book amply demonstrates (...)
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  42.  24
    Using Small‐Area Variations to Inform Health Care Service Planning: What Do We 'Need' to Know?Mathew Mercuri, Stephen Birch & Amiram Gafni - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (6):1054-1059.
  43.  8
    What To Do with the Past?: Sanskrit Literary Criticism in Postcolonial Space.V. S. Sreenath - 2021 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 49 (1):129-144.
    Throughout its history of almost a millennium and a half, Sanskrit kāvyaśāstra was resolutely obsessed with the task of unravelling the ontology kāvya. Literary theoreticians in Sanskrit, irrespective of their spatio-temporal locations, unanimously agreed upon the fact that kāvya was a special mode of expression characterized by the presence of certain unique linguistic elements. Nonetheless, this did not imply that kāvyaśāstra was an intellectual tradition unmarked by disagreements. The real point of contention among the practitioners of Sanskrit literary theory was (...)
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  44.  79
    Sceptical Deliberations.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):383-408.
    Suppose I am a leeway sceptic: I think that, whenever I face a choice between two courses of action, I lack true alternatives. Can my practical deliberation be rational? Call this the Deliberation Question. This paper has three aims in tackling it. Its constructive aim is to provide a unified account of practical deliberation. Its corrective aim is to amend the way that philosophers have recently framed the Deliberation Question. Finally, its disputative aim is to argue that leeway sceptics cannot (...)
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  45. Doxastic Deliberation.Nishi Shah & J. David Velleman - 2005 - Philosophical Review 114 (4):497-534.
    Believing that p, assuming that p, and imagining that p involve regarding p as true—or, as we shall call it, accepting p. What distinguishes belief from the other modes of acceptance? We claim that conceiving of an attitude as a belief, rather than an assumption or an instance of imagining, entails conceiving of it as an acceptance that is regulated for truth, while also applying to it the standard of being correct if and only if it is true. We (...)
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  46.  90
    What We Together Can (Be Required to) Do.Felix Pinkert - 2014 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38 (1):187-202.
    In moral and political philosophy, collective obligations are promising “gap-stoppers” when we find that we need to assert some obligation, but can not plausibly ascribe this obligation to individual agents. Most notably, Bill Wringe and Jesse Tomalty discuss whether the obligations that correspond to socio-economic human rights are held by states or even by humankind at large. The present paper aims to provide a missing piece for these discussions, namely an account of the conditions under which obligations can apply to (...)
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  47.  56
    Seminar with Bernard Williams 25 November 1998 — Institute of Philosophy — KU Leuven.Bernard Williams - 1999 - Ethical Perspectives 6 (3-4):243-265.
    Arnold Burms: Professor Williams has said that he is willing to answer some of our questions about his work. Given the amount of work he has to do here in a few days, this was a generous decision for which we are genuinely grateful. Professor Van de Putte will start the discussion with some questions about the relation between theory and practice.André Van de Putte: In Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy you situate ethical thought in the context of a (...)
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  48. “Answers to Five Questions on Normative Ethics”.Peter Vallentyne - 2007 - In Jesper Ryberg & Thomas S. Peterson (eds.), Normative Ethics: Five Questions. Automatic Press/VIP.
    I came late to philosophy and even later to normative ethics. When I started my undergraduate studies at the University of Toronto in 1970, I was interested in mathematics and languages. I soon discovered, however, that my mathematical talents were rather meager compared to the truly talented. I therefore decided to study actuarial science (the applied mathematics of risk assessment for insurance and pension plans) rather than abstract math. After two years, however, I dropped out of university, went to work (...)
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  49. Animal Pain: What It is and Why It Matters. [REVIEW]Bernard E. Rollin - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):425-437.
    The basis of having a direct moral obligation to an entity is that what we do to that entity matters to it. The ability to experience pain is a sufficient condition for a being to be morally considerable. But the ability to feel pain is not a necessary condition for moral considerability. Organisms could have possibly evolved so as to be motivated to flee danger or injury or to eat or drink not by pain, but by “pangs of pleasure” (...)
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  50.  24
    What Does It Mean to Occupy?Tim Gilman & Matt Statler - 2012 - Continent 2 (1):36-39.
    Place mouse over image continent. 2.1 (2012): 36–39. From an ethical and political perspective, people and property can hardly be separated. Indeed, the modern political subject – that is, the individual, the person, the self, the autonomous actor, the rational self-interest maximizer, etc. – has taken shape in and through the elaboration, institutionalization, and enactment of that which rightfully belongs to it. This thread can be traced back perhaps most directly to Locke’s notion that the origin of the political state (...)
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