Results for 'Derek Brough'

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  1.  6
    Languages, Meta-Languages and METATEM, A Discussion Paper.Howard Barringer, Graham Gough, Derek Brough, Dov Gabbay & Ian Hodkinson - 1996 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 4 (2):255-272.
    Meta-languages are vital to the development and usage of formal systems, and yet the nature of meta-languages and associated notions require clarification. Here we attempt to provide a clear definition of the requirements for a language to be a meta-language, together with consideration of issues of proof theory, model theory and interpreters for such a language.
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  2.  10
    John Brough: Collected Papers.Edwin Gerow, Minoru Hara, J. C. Wright & John Brough - 1998 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 118 (1):152.
  3. Consciousness is Not a Bag: Immanence, Transcendence, and Constitution in the Idea of Phenomenology.John B. Brough - 2008 - Husserl Studies 24 (3):177-191.
    A fruitful way to approach The Idea of Phenomenology is through Husserl’s claim that consciousness is not a bag, box, or any other kind of container. The bag conception, which dominated much of modern philosophy, is rooted in the idea that philosophy is restricted to investigating only what is really immanent to consciousness, such as acts and sensory contents. On this view, what Husserl called the riddle of transcendence can never be solved. The phenomenological reduction, as Husserl develops it in (...)
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  4.  22
    Something That is Nothing but Can Be Anything: The Image and Our Consciousness of It.John Brough - 2012 - In Dan Zahavi (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Phenomenology. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter concentrates on the nature of the image as it presents itself in experience, with its remarkable capacity to represent within itself people, events, emotions, and many other things, and with its place in art. The Husserlian perspective has many affinities with more recent investigations of images. The physical dimension of image plays an important role in imaging and has been largely neglected by philosophers, though not by artists. The uniqueness of image consciousness rests in its ability to see (...)
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  5. The Emergence of an Absolute Consciousness in Husserl's Early Writings on Time-Consciousness.John Brough - 1972 - Man and World 5 (3):298-326.
    The collection of Edmund Husserl's sketches on time-consciousness from the years 1893-1917, edited by Rudolf Boehm and published as Volume X in the Husserliana series, affords significant new material for the study of the evolution of Husserl's thought. Specifically, the sketches suggest that in the course of analyzing the consciousness of temporal objects Husserl became convinced that a distinction must be drawn between an ultimate or absolute flow of consciousness and the immanent temporal objects or contents -- sense-data, appearances of (...)
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  6. “The Most Difficult of All Phenomenological Problems”.John B. Brough - 2011 - Husserl Studies 27 (1):27-40.
    I argue in this essay that Edmund Husserl distinguishes three levels within time-consciousness: an absolute time-constituting flow of consciousness, the immanent acts of consciousness the flow constitutes, and the transcendent objects the acts intend. The immediate occasion for this claim is Neal DeRoo’s discussion of Dan Zahavi’s reservations about the notion of an absolute flow and DeRoo’s own efforts to mediate between Zahavi’s view and the position Robert Sokolowski and I have advanced. I argue that the flow and the tripartite (...)
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  7.  85
    Language First, Then Shared Intentionality, Then a Beneficent Spiral.Bickerton Derek - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):691-692.
    Tomasello et al. give a good account of how shared intentionality develops in children, but a much weaker one of how it might have evolved. They are unduly hasty in dismissing the emergence of language as a triggering factor. An alternative account is suggested in which language provided the spark, but thereafter language and shared intentionality coevolved.
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  8. Husserl on Memory.John B. Brough - 1975 - The Monist 59 (1):40-62.
    The point of departure for husserl's mature account of memory is his rejection of the traditional view that what is immediately and directly experienced in memory is a present image or replica of what is past and not what is past itself. Husserl rejects the image theory on logical and descriptive grounds, Arguing that memory is a direct consciousness of the past. Memory is experienced as a unique mode of consciousness giving its object in a manner irreducible to pictorial or (...)
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  9.  47
    Some Husserlian Comments on Depiction and Art.John Brough - 1992 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 66 (2):241-259.
  10. The Phenomenology of Painting.John B. Brough - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):894-896.
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  11.  63
    Husserl and the Deconstruction of Time.John B. Brough - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 46 (3):503 - 536.
    IN A RECENT AND PHILOSOPHICALLY RICH STUDY, David Wood has undertaken the deconstruction of time through an engagement with the thought of Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, and, of course, Derrida. The present essay is not intended to offer a sustained criticism of Wood's arguments or to canvass what he says about the quartet of philosophers noted above; rather, with his book as background, the essay's purpose is to say something about only one of the four philosophers--Edmund Husserl--and particularly about the place (...)
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  12.  80
    Temporality, Transcendence, and Difference: Some Reflections on Nicolas de Warren’s Husserl and the Promise of Time.John B. Brough - 2012 - Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):130-137.
  13.  97
    The Invention of Art. A Cultural History.John B. Brough - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):189-191.
  14.  64
    Time and Experience.John B. Brough - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (3):622-623.
    The author addresses three interlocking issues in this rich and interesting study: time-consciousness ; the question of temporal realism ; and the possibility of a special temporality belonging to human beings. The author's approach to these questions is phenomenological, generally in Husserl's sense of the term, although he does not hesitate to amend Husserl's method from a Heideggerian perspective and even to depart from it in ways that might leave Husserl himself quite aghast--as in the use of conclusions drawn from (...)
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  15.  15
    Combatant, Noncombatant, Criminal: The Importance of Distinctions.M. W. Brough - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (2):176-188.
    According to some, the combatant-noncombatant distinction has lost its relevance in today’s world. I examine two arguments to this effect. The first states that the distinction has become irrelevant when it categorizes children as combatants. I reply that the distinction has nothing to do with innocence or guilt, but with the degree to which a violent group poses a threat to others, even when it does so legitimately. The second argues that every civilian can be construed as a kind of (...)
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  16.  42
    Husserl's Ego.John Brough - 2005 - Philosophy Today 49 (Supplement):222-231.
  17. Legitimate Combatancy, Pow Status, and Terrorism.Michael W. Brough - 2005 - In Timothy Shanahan (ed.), Philosophy 9/11: Thinking About the War on Terrorism. Open Court.
     
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  18.  28
    The Paradoxes of Art: A Phenomenological Investigation.John B. Brough - 2006 - Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):895-897.
    Much recent discussion in philosophical aesthetics has focused on the issue of defining art, particularly visual art. Such efforts generally presume that art is important without explaining why it is important. It is the latter question that Alan Paskow addresses. He is interested in discovering how and why art, and especially painting, matter in our lives. This is an important topic. If art did not matter to people in some deeply personal sense, it would not be the subject of such (...)
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  19.  8
    Briefe an Roman Ingarden.John B. Brough - 1971 - New Scholasticism 45 (1):154-156.
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  20. Three Book Reviews: Edmund Husserl. 'Texte Zur Phänomenologie des Inneren Zeitbewusstseins (1893-1917)' Ed. Rudolf Bernet. Robert Sokolowski: 'Moral Action: A Phenomenological Study'. Hugo Dingler: 'Aufsätze der Methodik' Ed. Ulrich Weiss. [REVIEW]John B. Brough, Bernard P. Dauenhauer & Karl Schuhmann - 1987 - Husserl Studies 4 (3).
     
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  21.  30
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]John B. Brough, James Phillips, Alessio Gemma, Karin Nisenbaum & Aengus Daly - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (1):101 – 125.
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  22.  18
    Symposium: Is the Distinction of Feeling, Cognition, and Conation Valid as an Ultimate Distinction of the Mental Functions?G. F. Stout, J. Brough & Alexander Bain - 1889 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 1 (3):142 - 156.
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  23.  9
    Book Review:The Rational or Scientific Ideal of Morality. P. T. Fitzgerald. [REVIEW]J. Brough - 1898 - Ethics 8 (3):399-.
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  24.  15
    Book Review:On Human Nature: Essay (Partly Posthumous) in Ethics and Politics. Arthur Schopenhauer, T. Bailey Saunders. [REVIEW]J. Brough - 1898 - Ethics 8 (2):267-.
  25.  12
    Wittgenstein and Phenomenology.John B. Brough - 1985 - Idealistic Studies 15 (2):165-166.
    Professor Gier intends to offer a revisionist reading of Wittgenstein: “It is the analytic or positivist Wittgenstein who is the odd creature”. Wittgenstein was not, as opinion often has it, contemptuous of the classical metaphysicians or dismissive of such contemporaries as Husserl and Heidegger as purveyors of nonsense. In fact, he even came to an “explicit and positive use of the term ‘phenomenology’”. Professor Gier attempts to establish the nature and significance of this claim by examining a broad range of (...)
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  26.  7
    Wilfrid Desan, 1908-2001.John B. Brough - 2002 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 75 (5):189 - 190.
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  27. Symposium: Is Human Law the Basis of Morality, or Morality of Human Law?J. Brough, D. G. Ritchie & G. F. Stout - 1893 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (2):120 - 131.
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  28.  4
    Husserl and Erazim Kohák's "Idea and Experience".John B. Brough - 1981 - Man and World 14 (3):331.
  29.  1
    Critical Notices.J. Brough - 1894 - Mind 3 (10):113-118.
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  30.  1
    Critical Notices.J. Brough - 1895 - Mind 4 (13):113-118.
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  31. Philosophical Knowledge.John B. Brough, Daniel O. Dahlstrom & Henry Babcock Veatch (eds.) - 1980 - National Office of the American Catholic Philosophical Association, Catholic University of America.
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  32.  44
    The Many Faces of Time.John B. Brough (ed.) - 2000 - Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic.
    The authors of the essays collected in this volume continue that tradition, challenging, expanding, and deepening it.
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  33.  84
    On the Matter of Suffering: Derek Parfit and the Possibility of Deserved Punishment.Leo Zaibert - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (1):1-18.
    Derek Parfit has recently defended the view that no one can ever deserve to suffer. Were this view correct, its implications for the thorny problem of the justification of punishment would be extraordinary: age-old debates between consequentialists and retributivists would simply vanish, as punishment would only—and simply—be justifiable along Benthamite utilitarian lines. I here suggest that Parfit’s view is linked to uncharacteristically weak arguments, and that it ought to be rejected.
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  34.  57
    Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons: An Introduction and Critical Inquiry.Andrea Sauchelli (ed.) - 2020 - Routledge.
    Derek Parfit (1942–2017) is widely considered to be one of the most important moral philosophers of the twentieth century. Reasons and Persons is arguably the most influential of the two books published in his lifetime and hailed as a classic work of ethics and personal identity. Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons: An Introduction and Critical Inquiry is an outstanding introduction to and assessment of Parfit’s book, with chapters by leading scholars of ethics, metaphysics and of Parfit’s work. Part (...)
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  35. Review of Derek Parfit, On What Matters. [REVIEW]Jonathan Anomaly - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (3):358-360.
  36.  62
    Is Personal Identity Something That Does Not Matter? An Inquiry Into Derek Parfit and Alfred N. Whitehead.Eleonora Mingarelli - 2013 - Process Studies 42 (1):87-109.
    The purpose of the present article is to disentangle both Parfit’s and Whitehead’s views on personal identity. Issues regarding what it means to be a singular individual, how a person can remain the same over time, and what makes an individual an original being with specific characteristics will be examined.
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  37.  78
    Revisiting the Zahavi–Brough/Sokolowski Debate.Neal DeRoo - 2011 - Husserl Studies 27 (1):1-12.
    In 1999, Dan Zahavi’s Self Awareness and Alterity: A Phenomenological Investigation initiated a critique of the standard interpretation of the distinction between the second and third levels of Husserl’s analysis of time-constituting consciousness. At stake was the possibility of a coherent account of self-awareness (Zahavi’s concern), but also the possibility of prereflectively distinguishing the acts of consciousness (Brough and Sokolowski’s rebuttal of Zahavi’s critique). Using insights gained from Husserl’s Analyses Concerning Passive Synthesis rather than the work on time-consciousness, this (...)
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  38. Guessing the Future of the Past: Derek Turner, Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Realism Debate. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2007.Ben Jeffares - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (1):125-142.
    I review the book “Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate” by Derek Turner. Turner suggests that philosophers should take seriously the historical sciences such as geology when considering philosophy of science issues. To that end, he explores the scientific realism debate with the historical sciences in mind. His conclusion is a view allied to that of Arthur Fine: a view Turner calls the natural historical attitude. While I find Turner’s motivations good, I find his characterisation of (...)
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  39. Agreement Matters: Critical Notice of Derek Parfit, On What Matters.Stephen Darwall - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (1):79-105.
    Derek Parfit's Reasons and Persons (1984) mounted a striking defense of Act Consequentialism against a Rawls-inspired Kantian orthodoxy in moral philosophy. On What Matters (2011) is notable for its serious engagement with Kant's ethics and for its arguments in support of the “Triple Theory,” which allies Rule Consequentialism with Kantian and Scanlonian Contractualism against Act Consequentialism as a theory of moral right. This critical notice argues that what underlies this change is a view of the deontic concept of moral (...)
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  40. Personal Identity and the Importance of One's Own Body: A Response to Derek Parfit.Kim Atkins - 2000 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (3):329 – 349.
    In this essay I take issue with Derek Parfit's reductionist account of personal identity.Parfit is concerned to respond to what he sees as flaws in the conception of the role of 'person' in self-interest theories. He attempts to show that the notion of a person as something over and above a totality of mental and physical states and events (in his words, a 'further fact'), is empty, and so, our ethical concerns must be based on something other than this. (...)
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  41.  16
    Why Derek Parfit Had Reasons to Accept the Repugnant Conclusion.Torbjörn Tännsjö - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (4):387-397.
    Total views imply what Derek Parfit has called ‘the repugnant conclusion’. There are several strategies aimed at debunking the intuition that this implication is repugnant. In particular, it goes away when we consider the principle of unrestricted instantiation, according to which any instantiation of the repugnant conclusion must appear repugnant if we should be warranted in relying on it as evidence against total theories. However, there are instantiations of the conclusion where it doesn't seem to be at all repugnant. (...)
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  42.  63
    The Freeman-Mead Controversy Revisited: Or the Attempted Trashing of Derek Freeman.Ian Jarvie - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (4):531-541.
    Shankman holds that Derek Freeman “trashed” Margaret Mead’s reputation as a public intellectual by portraying her as a naïve and gullible anthropologist who perpetrated a serious error about adolescence in American Samoa. Shankman concedes that Mead’s Coming of Age in Samoa was factually in error but argues that her reputation in anthropology did not rest on it but rather on her extensive works on other societies. Ostensibly about Samoa, her book was rather a critique of American society and should (...)
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  43.  30
    Knowledge Argument Versus Bundle Theory According to Derek Parfit.Tomasz Huzarek - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (2):237-250.
    According to constitutive reductionism of Derek Parfit, a subject/person is not a separate existing being but his existence consists in the existence of a brain and body, performance of actions, thinking and occurrence of other physical and mental events. The identity of the subject in time comes down only to “Relation R” - mental consistency and/or connectedness – elicited by appropriate reasons. In the following article, I will try, relying on Frank Johnson's Knowledge Argument, to argue in favour of (...)
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  44. Should We Retire Derek Parfit?Ronald M. Green - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (1):3-3.
    For nearly a generation, Derek Parfit's arguments in his 1984 book Reasons and Persons have shaped debates about our moral responsibilities to future people. Struggling to accommodate Parfit's insights, philosophers and bioethicists have minimized or accentuated obligations to the future in ways that defy ordinary moral intuitions. In this issue, Robert Sparrow develops the troubling implications of the views of two leading theorists whose work favoring human genetic enhancement is influenced by Parfit. Sparrow believes they return us to the (...)
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  45.  42
    Derek Matravers.Derek Matravers & Jerrold Levinson - 2005 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79 (1):191–210.
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  46. Normativity, Necessity, and the Synthetic a Priori a Response to Derek Parfit.Chris Korsgaard - unknown
    If I understand him correctly, Derek Parfit’s views place us, philosophically speaking, in a very small box. According to Parfit, normativity is an irreducible non-natural property that is independent of the human mind. That is to say, there are normative truths - truths about what we ought to do and to want, or about reasons for doing and wanting things. The truths in question are synthetic a priori truths, and accessible to us only by some sort of rational intuition. (...)
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  47.  28
    Case Study: Introducing Philosophy of Art in Eight Case Studies by Derek Matravers.Davor Pećnjak - unknown
    In this review article, I present and discuss some theories and arguments which we can find in Derek Matravers’s opinonated textbook on the philosophy of art. Texbook consists of an introduction and eight chapters, but only some of the most important claims are discussed: various theories and definitions of art, the notions of expression and value of art and artworks, as well as the question whether we can learn something from artworks, beside, of course, what is considered as artistic (...)
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  48. Reviews: Derek Bickerton, Bastard Tongues. A Trailblazing Linguist Finds Clues to Our Common Humanity in the World’s Lowliest Languages. [REVIEW]Leonardo Caffo - 2010 - InKoj: Interlingvistikaj Kajeroj 1 (1):82-86.
    BASTARD TONGUES: A Trailblazing Linguist Finds Clues to Our Common Humanity in the World’s Lowliest Languages. Author: Derek Bickerton (270 pp. Hill & Wang. New York - 2008. $ 26.) Review by Leonardo Caffo.
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  49.  22
    What Matters in Caring: Some Reflections on Derek Parfit’s On What Matters.Christopher Donald Cordner - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):525-533.
    This essay is prompted by the recent publication of a volume of critical essays on Derek Parfit’s On What Matters, along with a third volume of On What Matters responding to those essays. Parfit and his interlocutors often end up either barely engaging with one another, or engaging on terms that are often questionable. As others have done, I question Parfit’s radical bifurcation of a merely ‘psychological’ sense of caring, of what it is for a thing or creature to (...)
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  50.  65
    Discounting the Future: John Rawls and Derek Parfit's Critique of the Discount Rate.L. van Liedekerke - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):72-83.
    This article concentrates on the critique by John Rawls and Derek Parfit of the use of a discount rate in economics. In a presentation of the basic economics underlying the use of a discount rate, the inherently problematic nature of people’s preferences with respect to time are highlighted. The second part discusses the role of the discount rate in economic optimal growth models. An outline of the economic theory of optimal growth is provided, pointing out how Rawls’s analysis of (...)
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