8 found
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  1. Darwin's Mistake: Explaining the Discontinuity Between Human and Nonhuman Minds.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):109-130.
    Over the last quarter century, the dominant tendency in comparative cognitive psychology has been to emphasize the similarities between human and nonhuman minds and to downplay the differences as (Darwin 1871). In the present target article, we argue that Darwin was mistaken: the profound biological continuity between human and nonhuman animals masks an equally profound discontinuity between human and nonhuman minds. To wit, there is a significant discontinuity in the degree to which human and nonhuman animals are able to approximate (...)
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  2. On the Lack of Evidence That Non-Human Animals Possess Anything Remotely Resembling a 'Theory of Mind'.Derek C. Penn & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2007 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 362 (1480):731-744.
  3.  78
    Darwin's Triumph: Explaining the Uniqueness of the Human Mind Without a Deus Ex Machina.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):153-178.
    In our target article, we argued that there is a profound functional discontinuity between the cognitive abilities of modern humans and those of all other extant species. Unsurprisingly, our hypothesis elicited a wide range of responses from commentators. After responding to the commentaries, we conclude that our hypothesis lies closer to Darwin's views on the matter than to those of many of our contemporaries.
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    So, Are We the Massively Lucky Species?Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):236-237.
    We are in vehement agreement with most of Vaesen's key claims. But Vaesen fails to consider or rebut the possibility that there are deep causal dependencies among the various cognitive traits he identifies as uniquely human. We argue that is one such linchpin trait in the evolution of human tool use, social intelligence, language, and culture.
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    There is More to Thinking Than Propositions.Derek C. Penn, Patricia W. Cheng, Keith J. Holyoak, John E. Hummel & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):221-223.
    We are big fans of propositions. But we are not big fans of the proposed by Mitchell et al. The authors ignore the critical role played by implicit, non-inferential processes in biological cognition, overestimate the work that propositions alone can do, and gloss over substantial differences in how different kinds of animals and different kinds of cognitive processes approximate propositional representations.
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    Commentary/Evans & Levinson: The Myth of Language Universals.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinellia - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5).
  7.  16
    Commentary/Vaesen: The Cognitive Bases of Human Tool Use.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinellib - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4).
  8.  9
    Universal Grammar and Mental Continuity: Two Modern Myths.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinelli - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):462-464.
    In our opinion, the discontinuity between extant human and nonhuman minds is much broader and deeper than most researchers admit. We are happy to report that Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) target article strongly corroborates our unpopular hypothesis, and that the comparative evidence, in turn, bolsters E&L's provocative argument. Both a Universal Grammar and the between human and nonhuman minds turn out to be modern myths.
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