14 found
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  1. Death and Furniture: the rhetoric, politics and theology of bottom line arguments against relativism.Derek Edwards, Malcolm Ashmore & Jonathan Potter - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):25-49.
  2.  85
    Death and Furniture: the rhetoric, politics and theology of bottom line arguments against relativism.Derek Edwards, Malcolm Ashmore & Jonathan Potter - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):25-49.
    ’Death’ and ’Furniture’ are emblems for two very common (predictable, even) objections to relativism. When relativists talk about the social construction of reality, truth, cognition, scientific knowledge, technical capacity, social structure and so on, their realist opponents sooner or later start hitting the furniture, invoking the Holocaust, talking about rocks, guns, killings, human misery, tables and chairs. The force of these objections is to introduce a bottom line, a bedrock of reality that places limits on what may be treated as (...)
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  3.  17
    Moaning, whinging and laughing: the subjective side of complaints.Derek Edwards - 2005 - Discourse Studies 7 (1):5-29.
    Indirect complaint sequences are examined in a corpus of everyday domestic telephone conversations. The analysis focuses on how a speaker/complainer displays and manages their subjective investment in the complaint. Four features are picked out: announcements, in which an upcoming complaint is projected in ways that signal the complainer’s stance or attitude; laughter accompanying the complaint announcement, and its delivery and receipt; displacement, where the speaker complains about something incidental to what would be expected to be the main offence; and uses (...)
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  4.  16
    Language and causation: A discursive action model of description and attribution.Derek Edwards & Jonathan Potter - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (1):23-41.
  5.  13
    Discourse, cognition and social practices: the rich surface of language and social interaction.Derek Edwards - 2006 - Discourse Studies 8 (1):41-49.
    Discursive psychology approaches discourse not as the product or expression of thoughts or mental states lying behind or beneath it, but as a domain of public accountability in which psychological states are made relevant. DP draws heavily on conversation analysis in examining in close empirical detail how ostensibly psychological themes are handled and managed as part of talk’s everyday interactional business. A brief worked example is offered, in which the intentionality of a person’s actions is handled in the course of (...)
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  6.  10
    Some uses of subject-side assessments.Jonathan Potter & Derek Edwards - 2017 - Discourse Studies 19 (5):497-514.
    We focus on assessments in conversation, paying particular attention to a distinction between object-side and subject-side assessments. O-side assessments are predicated of an object, whereas S-side assessments formulate a disposition of the speaker toward that object. Despite looking somewhat interchangeable, logically, these different ways of making assessments serve different interactional functions. In particular, S-side assessments allow for contrasting assessments of the same object by different persons. They are therefore useful in the management and avoidance of conflict and misalignment in the (...)
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  7.  9
    Facts, norms and dispositions: practical uses of the modal verb would in police interrogations.Derek Edwards - 2006 - Discourse Studies 8 (4):475-501.
    Two uses of the modal verb would in police interrogation are examined. First, suspects use it to claim a disposition to act in ways inconsistent with whatever offence they are accused of. Second, police officers use it in challenging the suspect’s testimony, asking why a witness would lie. Both uses deploy a form of practical inferential reasoning from norms to facts, in the face of disputed testimony. The value of would is that its semantics provide for a sense of back-dated (...)
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  8.  8
    `Did you have permission to smash your neighbour's door?' Silly questions and their answers in police—suspect interrogations.Derek Edwards & Elizabeth Stokoe - 2008 - Discourse Studies 10 (1):89-111.
    We examine the asking and answering of `silly questions' in British police interviews with suspects, the courses of action SQs initiate, and the institutional contingencies they are designed to manage. We show how SQs are asked at an important juncture toward the ends of interviews, following police officers' formulations of suspects' testimony. These formulations are confirmed or even collaboratively produced by suspects. We then examine the design of SQs and show how they play a central role in the articulation of (...)
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  9. Discourse: Noun, verb or social practice?Jonathan Potter, Margaret Wetherell, Ros Gill & Derek Edwards - 1990 - Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):205 – 217.
    This paper comments on some of the different senses of the notion of discourse in the various relevant literatures and then overviews the basic features of a coherent discourse analytic programme in Psychology. Parker's approach is criticised for (a) its tendency to reify discourses as objects; (b) its undeveloped notion of analytic practice; (c) its vulnerability to common sense assumptions. It ends by exploring the virtues of 'interpretative repertoires' over 'discourses' as an analytic/theoretical notion.
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  10.  30
    But What Do Children Really Think? Discourse Analysis and Conceptual Content in Children's Talk.Derek Edwards - 1993 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):207-225.
  11.  19
    Who Killed the Princess? Description and Blame in the British Press.Derek Edwards & Katie Macmillan - 1999 - Discourse Studies 1 (2):151-174.
    We examine the British newspapers' coverage of the death of Princess Diana and its immediate aftermath. Our main focus is on how the press dealt with the issue of their own potential culpability, as a feature of news reporting itself. The press deployed a series of descriptive categories and rhetorical oppositions, including regular press vs paparazzi; tabloid vs broadsheet; British vs foreign; supply vs demand ; and a number of general purpose devices such as a contrast between emotional reactions and (...)
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  12.  20
    Regulating criticism: some comments on an argumentative complex.Jonathan Potter, Derek Edwards & Malcolm Ashmore - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (4):79-88.
    This commentary identifies a range of flaws and contradictions in Parker’s critical realist position and his critique of relativism. In particular we highlight: (1) a range of basic errors in formulating the nature of relativism; (2) contradictions in the understanding and use of rhetoric; (3) problematic recruitment of the oppressed to support his argument; (4) tensions arising from the distinction between working in and against psychology. We conclude that critical realism is used to avoid doing empirical work, on the one (...)
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  13.  12
    Sensory-motor intelligence and semantic relations in early child grammar.Derek Edwards - 1973 - Cognition 2 (4):395-434.
  14.  42
    Rethinking cognition: On Coulter on discourse and mind. [REVIEW]Jonathan Potter & Derek Edwards - 2003 - Human Studies 26 (2):165-181.
    This paper responds to, and comments on, Coulter''s (1999) critique of discursive psychology with particular reference to how cognition is conceptualised theoretically and analytically. It first identifies a number of basic misreadings of discursive psychological writings, which distort and, at times, reverse its position on the status of cognition. Second, it reviews the main ways in which cognition, mental states, and thoughts have been analytically conceptualised in discursive psychology (respecification of topics from mainstream psychology, studies of the psychological thesaurus in (...)
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