13 found
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  1.  13
    A Political‐Economic Theory of Relevance: Explaining Climate Change Inaction.Ryan Gunderson, Diana Stuart & Matthew Houser - forthcoming - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour.
    Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour, EarlyView.
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  2.  33
    Risk, Anti-Reflexivity, and Ethical Neutralization in Industrial Food Processing.Diana Stuart & Michelle R. Worosz - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):287-301.
    While innovations have fostered the mass production of food at low costs, there are externalities or side effects associated with high-volume food processing. We focus on foodborne illness linked to two commodities: ground beef and bagged salad greens. In our analysis, we draw from the concepts of risk, reflexive modernization, and techniques of ethical neutralization. For each commodity, we find that systems organized for industrial goals overlook how production models foster cross-contamination and widespread outbreaks. Responses to outbreaks tend to rely (...)
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  3.  38
    Constrained Choice and Ethical Dilemmas in Land Management: Environmental Quality and Food Safety in California Agriculture. [REVIEW]Diana Stuart - 2008 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (1):53-71.
    As environmental and conservation efforts increasingly turn towards agricultural landscapes, it is important to understand how land management decisions are made by agricultural producers. While previous studies have explored producer decision-making, many fail to recognize the importance of external structural influences. This paper uses a case study to explore how consolidated markets and increasing corporate power in the food system can constrain producer choice and create ethical dilemmas over land management. Crop growers in the Central Coast region of California face (...)
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  4.  19
    The Illusion of Control: Industrialized Agriculture, Nature, and Food Safety. [REVIEW]Diana Stuart - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):177-181.
    I explore the role of nature in the agrifood system and how attempts to fit food production into a large-scale manufacturing model has lead to widespread outbreaks of food borne illness. I illustrate how industrial processing of leafy greens is related to the outbreak of E. coli 0157:H7 associated with spinach in the fall of 2006. I also use this example to show how industry attempts to create the illusion of control while failing to address weaknesses in current processing systems. (...)
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  5.  18
    Diversity in Agricultural Technology Adoption: How Are Automatic Milking Systems Used and to What End?Rebecca L. Schewe & Diana Stuart - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (2):199-213.
    Adoption of technology in agriculture can significantly reorganize production and relationships amongst humans, animals, technology, and the natural environment. However, the adoption of agricultural technology is not homogenous, and diversity in integration leads to a diversity of outcomes and impacts. In this study, we examine the adoption of automated milking systems in small and midsize dairy farms in the US Midwest, the Netherlands, and Denmark. In contrast to technological determinism, we find significant variation amongst adopters in the implementation of AMS (...)
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  6.  16
    Constrained Choice and Climate Change Mitigation in US Agriculture: Structural Barriers to a Climate Change Ethic.Diana Stuart & Rebecca L. Schewe - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (3):369-385.
    This paper examines structural barriers to the adoption of climate change mitigation practices and the evolution of a climate change ethic among American farmers. It examines how seed corn contracts in Michigan constrain the choices of farmers and allow farmers to rationalize the over-application of fertilizer and associated water pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Seed corn contracts use a competitive “tournament” system where farmers are rewarded for maximizing yields. Interviews and a focus group were used to understand fertilizer over-application and (...)
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  7. Erratum To: The Myth of Efficiency: Technology and Ethics in Industrial Food Production. [REVIEW]Diana Stuart & Michelle R. Worosz - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):257-257.
    Abstract In this paper, we explore how the application of technological tools has reshaped food production systems in ways that foster large-scale outbreaks of foodborne illness. Outbreaks of foodborne illness have received increasing attention in recent years, resulting in a growing awareness of the negative impacts associated with industrial food production. These trends indicate a need to examine systemic causes of outbreaks and how they are being addressed. In this paper, we analyze outbreaks linked to ground beef and salad greens. (...)
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  8.  11
    The Myth of Efficiency: Technology and Ethics in Industrial Food Production.Diana Stuart & Michelle R. Woroosz - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):231-256.
    In this paper, we explore how the application of technological tools has reshaped food production systems in ways that foster large-scale outbreaks of foodborne illness. Outbreaks of foodborne illness have received increasing attention in recent years, resulting in a growing awareness of the negative impacts associated with industrial food production. These trends indicate a need to examine systemic causes of outbreaks and how they are being addressed. In this paper, we analyze outbreaks linked to ground beef and salad greens. These (...)
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  9.  4
    How farmers “repair” the industrial agricultural system.Matthew Houser, Ryan Gunderson, Diana Stuart & Riva C. H. Denny - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 37 (4):983-997.
    Scholars are increasingly calling for the environmental issues of the industrial agricultural system to be addressed via eventual agroecological system-level transformation. It is critical to identify the barriers to this transition. Drawing from Henke’s theory of “repair,” we explore how farmers participate in the reproduction of the industrial system through “discursive repair,” or arguing for the continuation of the industrial agriculture system. Our empirical case relates to water pollution from nitrogen fertilizer and draws data from a sample of over 150 (...)
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  10.  7
    Materialized Ideology and Environmental Problems: The Cases of Solar Geoengineering and Agricultural Biotechnology.Brian Petersen, Diana Stuart & Ryan Gunderson - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (3):389-410.
    This article expands upon the notion of ideology as a material phenomenon, usually in the form of institutionalized, taken-for-granted practices. It draws on Herbert Marcuse and related thinkers to conceptualize technological solutions to environmental problems as materialized ideological responses to social-ecological contradictions, which, by concealing these contradictions, reproduce existing social conditions. This article outlines a method of technology assessment as ideology critique that draws attention to: the social determinants of the given technology; whether the technology conceals or masks social-ecological contradictions; (...)
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  11.  6
    Conservation Biologists and the Representation of At-Risk Species: Navigating Ethical Tensions in an Evolving Discipline.Diana Stuart & Jessica Bell Rizzolo - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (2):219-238.
    Conservation biology is a discipline with the explicit goal of protecting species from extinction. We examine how conservation biologists represent at-risk species, how they navigate values and ethical tensions in the discipline, and how they might be more effective in reaching conservation goals. While these topics are discussed in the literature, we offer a unique empirical examination of how individuals perceive and perform conservation work. We conducted 29 interviews with conservation biologists and found that most respondents viewed their work as (...)
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  12.  12
    Nonhuman Animals as Fictitious Commodities: Exploitation and Consequences in Industrial Agriculture.Diana Stuart & Ryan Gunderson - 2020 - Society and Animals 28 (3):291-310.
    This article examines how nonhuman animals, along with land and labor, represent fictitious commodities as described by Karl Polanyi. Animals in agriculture are examined as an extreme example of animal commodification whose use resembles the exploitation of land and labor. Conceptual frameworks developed from Marxist theory, including the subsumption of nature, the second contradiction of capitalism, and alienation, are applied to illustrate how the negative impacts to animals, the environment, and public health associated with animal agriculture are caused by attempts (...)
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  13.  11
    Radical Hope: Truth, Virtue, and Hope for What Is Left in Extinction Rebellion.Diana Stuart - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (3-6):487-504.
    This paper examines expressed hopelessness among environmental activists in Extinction Rebellion. While activists claim that they have lost all hope for a future without global warming and species extinction, through despair emerges a new hope for saving what can still be saved—a hope for what is left. This radical hope, emerging from despair, may make Extinction Rebellion even more effective. Drawing from personal interviews with 25 Extinction Rebellion activists in the United Kingdom and the published work of other Extinction Rebellion (...)
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