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  1.  18
    Getting Real: The Maryland Healthcare Ethics Committee Network’s COVID-19 Working Group Debriefs Lessons Learned.Norton Elson, Howard Gwon, Diane E. Hoffmann, Adam M. Kelmenson, Ahmed Khan, Joanne F. Kraus, Casmir C. Onyegwara, Gail Povar, Fatima Sheikh & Anita J. Tarzian - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (1):91-107.
    Responding to a major pandemic and planning for allocation of scarce resources under crisis standards of care requires coordination and cooperation across federal, state and local governments in tandem with the larger societal infrastructure. Maryland remains one of the few states with no state-endorsed ASR plan, despite having a plan published in 2017 that was informed by public forums across the state. In this article, we review strengths and weaknesses of Maryland’s response to COVID-19 and the role of the Maryland (...)
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  2.  4
    Reciprocity and Liability Protections during the Covid‐19 Pandemic.Valerie Gutmann Koch & Diane E. Hoffmann - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (3):5-7.
    During the Covid‐19 pandemic, as resources dwindled, clinicians, health care institutions, and policymakers have expressed concern about potential legal liability for following crisis standards of care (CSC) plans. Although there is no robust empirical research to demonstrate that liability protections actually influence physician behavior, we argue that limited liability protections for health care professionals who follow established CSC plans may instead be justified by reliance on the principle of reciprocity. Expecting physicians to do something they know will harm their patients (...)
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  3.  32
    The Woman Who Cried Pain: Do Sex-Based Disparities Still Exist in the Experience and Treatment of Pain?Diane E. Hoffmann, Roger B. Fillingim & Christin Veasley - 2022 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 50 (3):519-541.
    Over twenty years have passed since JLME published “The Girl Who Cried Pain: A Bias Against Women in the Treatment of Pain.” This article revisits the conclusions drawn in that piece and explores what we have learned in the last two decades regarding the experience of men and women who have chronic pain and whether women continue to be treated less aggressively for their pain than men.
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