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  1.  21
    Kant and the Faculty of Feeling.Diane Williamson & Kelly Sorensen (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press.
    Kant stated that there are three mental faculties: cognition, feeling, and desire. The faculty of feeling has received the least scholarly attention, despite its importance in Kant's broader thought, and this volume of new essays is the first to present multiple perspectives on a number of important questions about it. Why does Kant come to believe that feeling must be described as a separate faculty? What is the relationship between feeling and cognition, on the one hand, and desire, on the (...)
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  2.  18
    Gillian Brock, ed. Cosmopolitanism versus Non-Cosmopolitanism: Critiques, Defenses, Reconceptualizations. Reviewed by.Diane Williamson - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (2):58-60.
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  3.  22
    Kantianism, Liberalism, and Feminism: Resisting Oppression, written by Carol Hay.Diane Williamson - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (5):623-626.
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  4.  14
    Kant on Emotion and Value, edited by Alix Cohen.Diane Williamson - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (3):361-363.
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  5.  22
    ‘Let There Be Light’ – Reconsidering Kant’s Philosophy of Emotion.Diane Williamson - 2013 - In Stefano Bacin, Alfredo Ferrarin, Claudio La Rocca & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Kant und die Philosophie in weltbürgerlicher Absicht. Akten des XI. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Boston: de Gruyter. pp. 539-550.
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  6.  14
    What Can I Hope about the Earth’s Future Climate? Affective Resources for Overcoming Intergenerational Distance, Kantian and Otherwise.Diane Williamson - 2015 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 2 (1):57-82.
    While climate change involves spatial, epistemological, social, and temporal remoteness, each type of distance can be bridged with strategies unique to it that can be borrowed from analogous moral problems. Temporal, or intergenerational, distance may actually be a motivational resource if we look at our natural feelings of hope for the future of the world, via Kant’s theory of political history, and for our children. Kant’s theory of hope also provides some basis for including future generations in a theory of (...)
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  7.  23
    Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. [REVIEW]Diane Williamson - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):290-292.
  8.  27
    Review: Guyer, Kant. [REVIEW]Diane Williamson - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):234-236.
  9.  26
    The Cambridge Companion to Adorno. [REVIEW]Diane Williamson - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (2):195-197.
  10.  35
    The Philosophy of Human Nature. [REVIEW]Diane Williamson - 2010 - Teaching Philosophy 33 (2):231-233.