Order:
  1.  23
    From Basic Processes to Real-World Problems: How Research on Emotion and Emotion Regulation Can Inform Understanding of Psychopathology, and Vice Versa.Daniel G. Dillon, Christen M. Deveney & Diego A. Pizzagalli - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):74-82.
    Research on emotion and emotion regulation is expected to improve our understanding of psychopathology. However, achieving this understanding requires overcoming several obstacles, including the paucity of objective markers of specific emotions or psychiatric diagnoses, and the fact that emotion regulation is a concept that can be difficult to operationalize. We review affective neuroscience research that has addressed these issues by focusing on psychological and neural mechanisms implicated in approach and avoidance behaviors, as revealed by studies of fear, anxiety, and reward (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  80
    The Role of Frontocingulate Pathways in the Emotion-Cognition Interface: Emerging Clues From Depression.Diego A. Pizzagalli - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):214-215.
    By emphasizing nonlinear dynamics between appraisal and emotions, Lewis's model provides a valuable platform for integrating psychological and neural perspectives on the emotion-cognition interface. In this commentary, I discuss the role of neuroscience in shaping new conceptualizations of emotion and the putative role of theta oscillation within frontocingulate pathways in depression, a syndrome in which emotion-cognition relations are dysfunctional.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  23
    Impaired Hedonic Capacity in Major Depressive Disorder: Impact on Affiliative Behaviors.Diego A. Pizzagalli & Christen M. Deveney - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):362-363.
    Research on the neurobiology and psychosocial features of Major Depressive Disorder has the ability to extend our understanding of affiliative behavior. In depression, decreased hedonic capacity and hypoactivity in dopaminergic and prefrontal circuitries may decrease the ability to experience affiliative relationships as rewarding. We suggest that neurobiological research on depression can provide a test case for theoretical models of affiliation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark