Results for 'Dionysia Saratsli'

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  1.  14
    Cross-linguistic frequency and the learnability of semantics: Artificial language learning studies of evidentiality.Dionysia Saratsli, Stefan Bartell & Anna Papafragou - 2020 - Cognition 197 (C):104194.
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  2.  7
    Science-Based Lawmaking : How to Effectively Integrate Science in International Environmental Law.Dionysia-Theodora Avgerinopoulou - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    The Book takes the approach of a critique of the prevailing international environmental law-making processes and their systemic shortcomings. It aims to partly redesign the current international environmental law-making system in order to promote further legislation and more effectively protect the natural environment and public health. Through case studies and doctrinal analyses, an array of initial questions guides the reader through a variety of factors influencing the development of International Environmental Law. After a historical analysis, commencing from the Platonic philosophy (...)
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  3.  14
    American Dionysia.Steven Johnston - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (3):255-275.
    Pluralism's renaissance, thanks to William Connolly, Chantal Mouffe and others, has established its position as the distinctive voice of late modern democracy. It thus calls for an explicit theory of tragedy to address the antagonisms and enmities it reflects and fosters. Treating Machiavelli, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Weber and Camus as members of a minor tradition of thought, I articulate a political conception of tragedy that flows not from the failures of politics but, ironically, from politics at its best. A tragic understanding (...)
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  4.  22
    American Dionysia: Violence, tragedy and democratic politics.Charles Snyder - 2015 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (4):501-504.
  5. The Great Dionysia and civic ideology.Simon Goldhill - 1987 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 107:58-76.
    There have been numerous attempts to understand the role and importance of the Great Dionysia in Athens, and it is a festival that has been made crucial to varied and important characterizations of Greek culture as well as the history of drama or literature. Recent scholarship, however, has greatly extended our understanding of the formation of fifth-century Athenian ideology—in the sense of the structure of attitudes and norms of behaviour—and this developing interest in what might be called a ‘civic (...)
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  6.  22
    American Dionysia.Steven Johnston - 2009 - Contemporary Political Theory 8 (3):255-275.
    Pluralism's renaissance, thanks to William Connolly, Chantal Mouffe and others, has established its position as the distinctive voice of late modern democracy. It thus calls for an explicit theory of tragedy to address the antagonisms and enmities it reflects and fosters. Treating Machiavelli, Rousseau, Nietzsche, Weber and Camus as members of a minor tradition of thought, I articulate a political conception of tragedy that flows not from the failures of politics but, ironically, from politics at its best. A tragic understanding (...)
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  7.  8
    The dionysia and democracy again.P. J. Rhodes - 2011 - Classical Quarterly 61 (1):71-74.
  8.  20
    The City Dionysia and the Structure of Plato’s Symposium.Nicholas Riegel - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):259-286.
  9.  16
    The (alleged) sacrifice and procession at Rural Dionysia in Aristophanes’ Acharnians.Bartłomiej Bednarek - 2019 - Hermes 147 (2):143.
    The following article challenges the traditional reading of the Rural Dionysia scene in Aristophanes’ Acharnians. It is often assumed that the text contains a reference to an animal sacrifice, which is arguably absent from this comedy. Moreover, the vast majority of scholars claim that the lines 244 ff. were uttered after the procession of worshippers reached the altar in the orchestra. However, as I argue, these verses were most probably spoken by the characters in front of the door of (...)
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  10.  13
    Book Review: American Dionysia: Violence, Tragedy, and Democratic Politics, by Steven Johnston. [REVIEW]Robyn Marasco - 2017 - Political Theory 45 (6):877-881.
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  11.  10
    Chapter four. Citizen as theate¯s : Performing unity, reciprocity, and strong-mindedness in the city dionysia.S. Sara Monoson - 2000 - In Susan Sara Monoson (ed.), Plato’s Democratic Entanglements: Athenian Politics and the Practice of Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 88-112.
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  12.  4
    Tragic honours and democracy: neglected evidence for the politics of the Athenian Dionysia.F. Zeitlin - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59:8-29.
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  13.  29
    Tragic honours and democracy: Neglected evidence for the politics of the athenian dionysia.Peter Wilson - 2009 - Classical Quarterly 59 (1):8-.
  14.  10
    Sourvinou-Inwood C. edited by Parker R. Athenian Myths and Festivals: Aglauros, Erechtheus, Plynteria, Panathenaia, Dionysia. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. xiii + 377. $150. 9780199592074. [REVIEW]Esther Eidinow - 2013 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 133:208-210.
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  15.  38
    Carl A. P. Ruck: I.G. ii 2 2323: The List of the Victors in Comedies at the Dionysia. Pp. ix+59. 7 figs. Leiden: Brill, 1967. Paper, fl. 12. [REVIEW]D. M. Lewis - 1969 - The Classical Review 19 (02):243-244.
  16.  12
    Carl A. P. Ruck: I.G. ii 2 2323: The List of the Victors in Comedies at the Dionysia. Pp. ix+59. 7 figs. Leiden: Brill, 1967. Paper, fl. 12. [REVIEW]D. M. Lewis - 1969 - The Classical Review 19 (2):243-244.
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  17.  7
    Platón y el orfismo: diálogos entre religión y filosofía.Alberto Bernabé Pajares - 2011 - Madrid: Abada Editores.
    En este libro tratamos de evaluar la veracidad y de determinar el peso real de los contenidos de la doctrina órfica en Platón, a través del examen exhaustivo de los textos antiguos de que disponemos sobre este movimiento religioso, textos que son, además, presentados y traudcidos en un apéndice final. La indagación pone de manifiesto que hay numerosos puntos del orfismo que inspiraron el pensamiento de Platón, pero que los sometió a una profunda modificación para acoplarlos a sus propias ideas.
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  18.  6
    Lire Platon.Abel Jeannière - 1990 - Paris: Aubier.
  19.  19
    Improvement by love: from Aeschines to the old academy.Harold Tarrant - unknown
    The Alcibiades purports to offer us the very first conversation between Socrates and Alcibiades. Previously, it seems, Socrates has just lingered at the back of a crowd of lovers looking rather stupid. This is hardly surprising. Socrates did look stupid, and both Aristophanes and his rival Ameipsias thought that he was good enough material for a laugh to present him on stage in their comedies at the Dionysia of 423 BC. The only slight surprise here is that Alcibiades, though (...)
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  20.  9
    Judging Athenian dramatic competitions.C. W. Marshall & Stephanie van Willigenburg - 2004 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:90-107.
    This paper presents a new model for how the voting worked at the Athenian dramatic competitions, and demonstrates its viability mathematically. Previous proposals have either failed to take full account of the ancient sources or have not considered all the possible permutations of judging results. As is generally recognized, ten votes were cast, but in most circumstances not all were counted. Sections I-IV consider the tragic competition at the Dionysia, in which three competitors vied for the prize. For the (...)
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  21. Spirit Tactics, Exorcising Dances.Joshua M. Hall - 2024 - Idealistic Studies 54 (1):27-48.
    In Michel de Certeau’s Invention of the Everyday, improvisational community dance function as a catalyst for the subversive art of the oppressed, via its ancient Greek virtue/power of mētis, being “foxlike.” And in de Certeau’s The Possession of Loudun, this foxlike dance moves to the stage, as an improv chorus that disrupts the events at Loudon when reimagined as a tetralogy of plays at City Dionysia. More precisely, Loudun’s tetralogy could be interpreted as a series of three tragedies and (...)
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  22.  13
    Une inscription dionysiaque peu commune.Paul Veyne - 1985 - Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 109 (1):621-624.
    Une inscription trouvée à Chalcis célèbre l'exploit d'un Callinikos qui lors des Dionysia a fait 55 fois le tour de l'orchestra, porté sur une perche, et qui a soulevé seul le phallos. Rapprochement avec diverses traditions populaires.
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  23.  28
    Brilliant Dynasts: Power and Politics in the "Oresteia".Mark Griffith - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):62-129.
    Intertwined with the celebration of Athenian democratic institutions, we find in the "Oresteia" another chain of interactions, in which the elite families of Argos, Phokis, Athens, and even Mount Olympos employ the traditional aristocratic relationships of xenia and hetaireia to renegotiate their own status within-and at the pinnacle of-the civic order, and thereby guarantee the renewed prosperity of their respective communities. The capture of Troy is the result of a joint venture by the Atreidai and the Olympian "family" . Although (...)
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  24.  13
    Spirit Tactics, Exorcising Dances.Joshua M. Hall - 2024 - Idealistic Studies 54 (1):27-48.
    In Michel de Certeau’s Invention of the Everyday, improvisational community dance function as a catalyst for the subversive art of the oppressed, via its ancient Greek virtue/power of mētis, being “foxlike.” And in de Certeau’s The Possession of Loudun, this foxlike dance moves to the stage, as an improv chorus that disrupts the events at Loudon when reimagined as a tetralogy of plays at City Dionysia. More precisely, Loudun’s tetralogy could be interpreted as a series of three tragedies and (...)
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  25.  6
    Le „Vespe“ di Aristofane e la datazione dell’„Elettra“ di Euripide.Nuala Distilo - 2013 - Hermes 141 (2):212-217.
    This paper analyzes and discusses related passages of Euripides’ „Electra“ and Aristophanes’ „Wasps“ in order to suggest a date for the performance of the „Electra“. Particularly interesting are: Ar. „Wasps“ 615 and Eur. „Electra“ 985; „Wasps“ 1490, 1492, 1530 and „Electra“ 860-861, which seem to reveal more complex dynamics of dependence in the Aristophanic attempt to mock the language excessively hyperbolic of Euripides. In my opinion these puns and innuendos may endorse the dating of Euripides’ „Electra“ at the Great (...) of 423 b. C. one year before the performance of Aristophanes’ „Wasps“. (shrink)
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  26.  14
    Sung Poems and Poetic Songs: Hellenistic Definitions of Poetry, Music and the Spaces in Between.Spencer A. Klavan - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):597-615.
    Simply by formulating a question about the nature of ancient Greek poetry or music, any modern English speaker is already risking anachronism. In recent years especially, scholars have reminded one another that the words ‘music’ and ‘poetry’ denote concepts with no easy counterpart in Greek. μουσική in its broadest sense evokes not only innumerable kinds of structured movement and sound but also the political, psychological and cosmic order of which song, verse and dance are supposed to be perceptible manifestations. Likewise, (...)
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  27.  12
    Loi d'Érétrie contre la tyrannie et l'oligarchie (première partie).Denis Knoepfler - 2001 - Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénique 125 (1):195-238.
    Découverte près d'Alivéri en Eubée, cette importante inscription du milieu du IVe siècle av. J.-C. est demeurée longtemps inédite. Il s'agit d'une grande stèle amputée en haut et à gauche, où se lisent encore 35 lignes gravées stoichédon (à raison de 51 lettres par ligne après restitution). Sur la base du lieu de trouvaille, de la langue et du contenu, on peut rapporter à la même stèle le fragment IG XII 9, 190, en dépit du fait que ce petit morceau (...)
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  28.  15
    Organization of Festivals and the Dionysiac Guilds.G. M. Sifakis - 1965 - Classical Quarterly 15 (02):206-.
    I. We know fairly well how the City Dionysia at Athens was celebrated in classical times. But although the numerous dramatic festivals of the Hellenistic period were in many respects modelled on the Athenian Dionysia, it is not clear how the performances at these festivals were organized. The difficulty arises from the fact that apart from a few great centres which may have had their own theatre production, playwrights, actors, etc., the majority of cities depended on the travelling (...)
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  29.  1
    Jedność wielości: świat, człowiek, państwo w refleksji nurtu orficko-pitagorejskiego.Piotr Świercz - 2008 - Katowice: Wydawn. Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.
  30.  10
    Comic Rivalry and the Number of Comic Poets at the Lenaia of 405 B. C.Andrew Hartwig - 2012 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 156 (2):195-206.
    This paper considers further evidence that five comic poets as opposed to three competed at the Lenaia and City Dionysia festivals in Athens during the Peloponnesian War. Aristophanes’ abuse of his comic rivals Phrynichos, Ameipsias and Lykis in the opening scene ofFrogs, produced at the Lenaia of 405, is interpreted as a response to his immediate competitors at the dramatic contest that year. A survey of the evidence elsewhere in comedy suggests that comic poets usually reserved such attacks on (...)
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  31.  5
    Teatr zawsze umiera.Stanley Gontarski - 2020 - Acta Universitatis Lodziensis. Folia Litteraria Polonica 59 (4):191-209.
    The Theater Is always Dying traces the resilience of live theatrical performance in the face of competing performative forms like cinema, television and contemporary streaming services on personal, hand-held devices and focuses on theater’s ability to continue as a significant cultural, community and intellectual force in the face of such competition. To echo Beckett, we might suggest, then, that theater may be at its best at its dying since its extended demise seems self-regenerating. Whether or not you “go out of (...)
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  32.  18
    Seeing Weasels: The Superstitious Background of the Empusa Scene in the Frogs.E. K. Borthwick - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (02):200-.
    Every Greek scholar knows the celebrated lapsus linguae committed by the tragic actor Hegelochus at the Great Dionysia of 408 B.C., when he faltered in his enunciation of line 279 of Euripides' Orestes and gave the impression to the mirthful audience of having said I am surprised, however, that the commentators on this line have only partially explained the reason for its having seemed exceptonally funny.
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  33.  3
    Seeing Weasels: The Superstitious Background of the Empusa Scene in the Frogs.E. K. Borthwick - 1968 - Classical Quarterly 18 (2):200-206.
    Every Greek scholar knows the celebrated lapsus linguae committed by the tragic actor Hegelochus at the Great Dionysia of 408 B.C., when he faltered in his enunciation of line 279 of Euripides' Orestes and gave the impression to the mirthful audience of having said I am surprised, however, that the commentators on this line have only partially explained the reason for its having seemed exceptonally funny.
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  34.  13
    Another Look at Female Choruses in Classical Athens.F. Budelmann & T. Power - 2015 - Classical Antiquity 34 (2):252-295.
    This article revisits the issue of female choruses in Classical Athens and aims to provide an alternative to the common pessimistic view that emphasizes the restriction of female choreia by the gender ideology of the democracy. We agree that Athens did not have the kind of female choral culture that is documented for Sparta or Argos, but a review of the evidence suggests that women did dance regularly both in the city itself and elsewhere in Attica, although not at the (...)
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  35.  19
    The aristophanic slapstick.R. Drew Griffith - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):530-533.
    Revising Clouds for publication some five years after its third-place showing in the City Dionysia of 423 b.c., Aristophanes retooled the first parabasis to praise the play's propriety, omitting as it did distasteful matter and gratuitous buffoonery, which—along with the judges’ crassness—accounted, he says, for its failure.
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  36.  15
    Father Silenus: Actor or Coryphaeus?1.Dana Ferrin Sutton - 1974 - Classical Quarterly 24 (1):19-23.
    During the entire period of the creative activity of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, tragic playwrights were required to enter the dramatic competition at the Dionysia with tetralogies consisting of three tragedies followed by a satyr play. This last was a comparatively short mythological travesty, a, 2 that received its name because its chorus is invariably composed of satyrs:3 comical half-men, half-beasts who regularly embody a wide range of shortcomings but nevertheless are possessed of a mysterious fund of knowledge and (...)
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  37. Pythagoras und Orpheus.Karl Kerényi - 1950 - Zürich,: Rhein-Verlag.
     
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