Results for 'Diotima'

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  1.  70
    Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing.Frederick C. Beiser - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Diotima's Children is a re-examination of the rationalist tradition of aesthetics which prevailed in Germany in the late seventeenth and eighteenth century.
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  2. Diotima at the Barricades: French Feminists Read Plato.Paul Allen Miller - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Diotima at the Barricades argues that the debates that emerged from the burgeoning of feminist intellectual life in post-modern France involved complex, structured, and reciprocal exchanges on the interpretation and position of Plato and other ancient texts in the western philosophical and literary tradition. Paul Allen Miller shows how individual works of Anglo-American figures such as Toril Moi, Judith Butler, and Kaja Silverman, as well as movements such as queer theory, are rooted in feminist theoretical debates that began in (...)
     
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  3.  26
    Diotima's Ghost: The Uncertain Place of Feminist Philosophy in Professional Philosophy.Margaret Urban Walker - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):153-164.
  4.  44
    Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing.Kai Hammermeister - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):353-355.
    (2011). Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism from Leibniz to Lessing. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 353-355.
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  5.  42
    Diotima's Ghost: The Uncertain Place of Feminist Philosophy in Professional Philosophy.Margaret Urban Walker - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):153-165.
  6.  30
    Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1-27.
    Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the “rites of love” in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, (...)
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  7.  79
    Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's.Nancy Evans - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.
    : Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian (...)
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  8. Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium.Ralph Wedgwood - 2009 - Phronesis 54 (4-5):297-325.
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato's Symposium (199d-212a). According to this interpretation, the term "καλóν", as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call "intrinsic value"; and "love" (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation , which for Plato consists in the desire to "possess" intrinsically valuable things - that is, according to Plato, to be happy - for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that "possessing" (...)
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  9. Socrates and Diotima: Eros, Immortality, and Creativity.Christopher Rowe - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15:239-259.
  10.  21
    Re‐Reading Diotima: Resources for a Relational Pedagogy.Rachel Jones - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):183-201.
    This article considers a range of responses to Plato's Symposium, paying particular attention to Diotima's speech on eros and philosophy. It argues that Diotima's teachings contain resources for a relational pedagogy, but that these resources come more sharply into focus when Plato's text is read through the lens of contemporary (20th and 21st century) thinkers. The article therefore draws on the work of David Halperin, Hannah Arendt, Jean-François Lyotard and Luce Irigaray to argue that Diotima points us (...)
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  11.  3
    Diotima's Concept of Love.Harry Neumann - 1965 - American Journal of Philology 86 (1):33.
  12. Agathon, Pausanias, and Diotima in Plato's Symposium : Paiderastia and Philosophia.Luc Brisson - 2006 - In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Harvard University Press.
  13.  60
    The Subject of Love: Diotima and Her Critics.Andrea Nye - 1990 - Journal of Value Inquiry 24 (2):135-153.
  14.  19
    Diotima and the Inclusive Classroom.Kristin Schaupp - 2017 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 3:53-71.
    Despite a growing awareness that the philosophical canon consists almost exclusively of white male philosophers, it can be tempting to ignore the problem—especially for those who lack either the time or the expertise to fix it. Yet philosophical practice regularly requires us to raise questions and acknowledge issues even when we lack solutions. Engaging students in a discussion about dismissive or exclusionary comments that they notice in the reading is a good place to start; it provides insight into the origins (...)
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  15. Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing (Review).Ursula Goldenbaum - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):258-259.
  16.  39
    Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing.P. Guyer - 2012 - Philosophical Review 121 (2):285-290.
  17.  13
    Diotima neuplatonisch.Willy Theiler - 1968 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 50 (1-2):29-47.
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  18. Diotima and Kuèsis in the Light of the Myths of the God’s Annexation of Pregnancy.Anne Gabrièle Wersinger - 2015 - Plato Journal 14:23-38.
    Reported by a male, one of Diotima’s thesis seems rather surprising: men’ desire is to become pregnant. Scholars have pretended that kuèsis applied to males must be interpreted in a metaphorical sense, but this prohibits understanding why Diotima chooses this metaphor rather than another. In the light of the mythological traditions going back to Hesiod, Orpheus, and the New Musicians who emphasize the novelty of their music while considering themselves as begetting a newborn child, it seems reasonable to (...)
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  19.  7
    Saving Diotima’s Account of Erotic Love in Plato’s Symposium.Thomas M. Tuozzo - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):83-104.
  20. As Diotima Saw Socrates.Amélie Oksenberg Rorty - forthcoming - Arion.
     
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  21.  7
    Diotima’s Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing, by Frederick C. Beiser. [REVIEW]Alexander Rueger - 2016 - Mind 125 (499):952-955.
  22. Diotima Tells a Story: A Narrative Analysis of Plato's Symposium'.Anne-Marie Bowery - 1996 - In Julie K. Ward (ed.), Feminism and Ancient Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  23. Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality (...)
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  24.  6
    Diotima, Wittgenstein, and a Language for Liberation.Deborah Orr - 2006 - In Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 51--54.
  25.  26
    PLUTARCH ON POETRY - R. Hunter, D. Russell Plutarch: How to Study Poetry . Pp. X + 222. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Paper, £22.99, US$38.99 . ISBN: 978-0-521-17360-5. [REVIEW]Diotima Papadi - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):84-85.
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  26.  21
    Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech.Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):32-44.
    “Sorcerer Love” is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality (...)
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  27. Diotima's Children By Frederick Beiser.Daniel Whistler - 2010 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 2 (2):15-16.
     
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  28.  54
    The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45 - 61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the (...)
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  29.  40
    Diotima's Children: German Aesthetic Rationalism From Leibniz to Lessing by Beiser, Frederick C.Joseph Cannon - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):420-422.
  30. Diotima e la generazione dell 'idea'.Giuliana Carugati - 2002 - Studi di Estetica 25:171-184.
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  31. El Canto de Diotima: Hölderlin y la Música.Helena Cortés - 1996 - Anuario Filosófico 29 (54):41-52.
    The song of Diotima. Hölderlin and music.- Hölderlin's work Hyperion shows itself to be eminently musical. On the one hand, it is an exalted form of human communication (the song of Diotima). On the other hand, it is an integral part of the nature which it describes. This paper is devoted to a study of the function of music and the interpretation of its meaning.
     
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  32.  17
    The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium.Andrea Nye - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):45-61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the (...)
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  33.  3
    Die Proklische Diotima : Philosophie, Religion Und Das Weibliche.Jana Schultz - 2019 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 22 (1):75-98.
    Diotima, the priestess of Plato’s Symposium, is an important reference for Proclus’ thinking about the role of women in philosophical and religious practices. This character does not just offer Proclus an example for women’s ability to attain the same level of virtue than men, but she is also a model for the joint work of philosophical and religious practices. Thereby she stands for practices which are orientated on the human condition and therefore depend on intermediary entities as demons, and (...)
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  34. Lettres de Socrate a Diotima.Fr Hemsterhuis & Kl Hammacher - 2008 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 70 (3):589.
  35.  1
    Philosophy’s First Hysterectomy: Diotima of Mantinea.Mary Ellen Waithe - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 29:125-129.
    Philosophy became known as a “man’s” profession over the past three thousand years. This is an account of how, in the case of Diotima of Mantinea, the histories of philosophy came to systematically ignore, overlook, doubt and declare false the fact that some philosophers had uteruses. The effect has been a massive hysterectomy –the removal from or ignoring of women’s contributions to Philosophy as related by the major histories and encyclopedias of Philosophy. This nearly discipline-wide hysterectomy has created the (...)
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  36.  1
    Roots of Discrimination Against Rohingya Minorities: Society, Ethnicity and International Relations.Akm Ahsan Ullah & Diotima Chattoraj - 2018 - Intellectual Discourse 26 (2):541-565.
    According to the United Nations, the Rohingya people are the most persecuted minority group in the world. The atrocities perpetrated by Myanmar authorities could by any reckoning be called ethnic cleansing. This paper delves into the level of discrimination against the Rohingya population perpetrated by Myanmar authorities in myriad of ways. A team of researchers interviewed 37 victims. The pattern of persecution goes back to 1948 – the year when the country achieved independence from their British colonizers. Today, this population (...)
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  37.  19
    Mine is Yours: Diotima’s Theory of Survival.Masaya Honda - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (3):281-301.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  38. The Ladder of Diotima. A Reading of Plato's' Symposium'.V. Melchiorre - 2001 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 93 (3):343-371.
  39. Fischer, Kuno, Diotima[REVIEW]Aloys Müller - 1929 - Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 34:200.
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  40. The Discourse of Diotima.Jared S. Moore - 1943 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):57.
     
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  41.  13
    Die Rede der Diotima: Untersuchungen Zum Platonischen Symposion. [REVIEW]Dougal Blyth - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):621-622.
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  42.  24
    The Role of Diotima in the Symposium: The Dialogue and Its Double.Christian Keime - 2015 - In Gabriele Cornelli (ed.), Plato's Styles and Characters: Between Literature and Philosophy. De Gruyter. pp. 379-400.
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  43.  13
    Do Belo como constituinte do humano segundo Sócrates/Diotima.M. Jorge de Carvalho - 2010 - Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 19 (38):369-468.
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  44. Il Corpo di Diotima: La Passione Filosofica E la Libertà Femminile.Patrizia Caporossi - 2009 - Quodlibet.
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  45.  27
    Die Rede der Diotima[REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):159-165.
  46.  2
    Die Rede der Diotima: Untersuchungen Zum Platonischen Symposion. [REVIEW]H. S. Schibli - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):159-165.
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  47. Il (in) nome di Eros. Una lettura del discorso di Diotima nel Simposio platonico.Giovanni Casertano - 1997 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 18 (2):277-310.
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  48.  26
    Tempo, desiderio, generazione: Diotima e Aristofane nel simposio di Platone.Alessandra Fussi - 2008 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 63 (1).
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  49. Time, Desire, Generation. Diotima and Aristophanes in Plato's' Simposio'.Alessandra Fussi - 2008 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 63 (1):1-27.
     
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  50.  72
    On Poietic Remembering and Forgetting: Hermeneutic Recollection and Diotima’s Historico-Hermeneutic Leanings.Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2018 - Symposium 22 (2):107-134.
    Like human existence itself, our enduring legacies—whether poetic, ethical, political, or philosophical—continually unfold and require recurrent communal engagement and (re)enactment. In other words, an ongoing performance of significant works must occur, and this task requires the collective human activity of re-membering or gathering-together-again. In the Symposium, Diotima provides an account of human pursuits of immortality through the creation of artifacts, including laws, poems, and philosophical discourses that resonates with Gadamer’s account of our engagement with artworks and texts. This essay (...)
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