Results for 'Disease'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Disease.Rachel Cooper - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (2):263-282.
    This paper examines what it is for a condition to be a disease. It falls into two sections. In the first I examine the best existing account of disease (as proposed by Christopher Boorse) and argue that it must be rejected. In the second I outline a more acceptable account of disease. According to this account, by disease we mean a condition that it is a bad thing to have, that is such that we consider the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   101 citations  
  2.  44
    How Scientists Explain Disease.Paul Thagard - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
    "This is a wonderful book! In "How Scientists Explain Disease," Paul Thagard offers us a delightful essay combining science, its history, philosophy, and sociology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   106 citations  
  3. Defining Disease Beyond Conceptual Analysis: An Analysis of Conceptual Analysis in Philosophy of Medicine.Maël Lemoine - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):309-325.
    Conceptual analysis of health and disease is portrayed as consisting in the confrontation of a set of criteria—a “definition”—with a set of cases, called instances of either “health” or “ disease.” Apart from logical counter-arguments, there is no other way to refute an opponent’s definition than by providing counter-cases. As resorting to intensional stipulation is not forbidden, several contenders can therefore be deemed to have succeeded. This implies that conceptual analysis alone is not likely to decide between naturalism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  4. Disease and the Deceased.W. Vaught & B. B. O'Connor - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (6):4.
  5. German Disease.Andrej Poleev - 2019
  6.  14
    Philosophical Diseases.Gregory White - 2006 - Philosophy Now 57:30-31.
  7.  6
    Defining Disease in the Context of Overdiagnosis.Mary Jean Walker & Wendy Rogers - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy: A European Journal 20 (2):269-280.
    Recently, concerns have been raised about the phenomenon of 'overdiagnosis', the diagnosis of a condition that is not causing harm, and will not come to cause harm. Along with practical, ethical, and scientific questions, overdiagnosis raises questions about our concept of disease. In this paper, we analyse overdiagnosis as an epistemic problem and show how it challenges many existing accounts of disease. In particular, it raises questions about conceptual links drawn between disease and dysfunction, harm, and risk. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  33
    The Nature of Disease.Lawrie Reznek - 1987 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  9.  46
    Health, Disease, and Causal Explanations in Medicine.Lennart Nordenfelt & B. Ingemar B. Lindahl (eds.) - 1984 - Reidel.
    A great number of constructive suggestions for the analysis of the concepts and models treated are presented in this book, which mirrors a current debate within the theory of medicine by covering three central topics: the concepts of health and disease; definition and classification in medicine; and causal explanation in medicine. Among the issues dealt with are: How should the concepts of health and disease be characterized in order to be of relevance to clinical practice? Should we try (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  10.  13
    Limited Aggregation and Zoonotic Disease Outbreaks.Angela K. Martin & Matthias Eggel - 2022 - Transforming Food Systems: Ethics, Innovation and Responsibility. Eursafe Conference Proceedings.
    Human and animal interests are often in conflict. In many situations, however, it is unclear how to evaluate and weigh competing human and animal interests, as the satisfaction of the interests of one group often inevitably occurs at the expense of those of the other group. Human-animal conflicts of this kind give rise to ethical questions. If animals count morally for their own sake, then we must ask in which cases the satisfaction or frustration of the interests of humans and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  22
    Diseases, Functions, Values, and Psychiatric Classification.John Z. Sadler & George J. Agich - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (3):219-231.
    The philosophy of medicine and psychiatry has considered the defining of disease, illness, and disorder an important project for over three decades. Within this literature, accounts based on adaptive "functions" have been prominent, particularly in the DSM nosology. In response to this trend, Jerome Wakefield has presented a view of mental disorder as "harmful dysfunction." In this view, "harm" contributes the value-element to disorder concepts, while "dysfunction" implies a value-free foundation as long as the latter is grounded in evolutionary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  12. Infectious Disease Ontology.Lindsay Grey Cowell & Barry Smith - 2009 - In Infectious Disease Informatics. New York: Springer New York. pp. 373-395.
    Technological developments have resulted in tremendous increases in the volume and diversity of the data and information that must be processed in the course of biomedical and clinical research and practice. Researchers are at the same time under ever greater pressure to share data and to take steps to ensure that data resources are interoperable. The use of ontologies to annotate data has proven successful in supporting these goals and in providing new possibilities for the automated processing of data and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  13.  8
    Rare Diseases in Healthcare Priority Setting: Should Rarity Matter?Andreas Albertsen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (9):624-628.
    Rare diseases pose a particular priority setting problem. The UK gives rare diseases special priority in healthcare priority setting. Effectively, the National Health Service is willing to pay much more to gain a quality-adjusted life-year related to a very rare disease than one related to a more common condition. But should rare diseases receive priority in the allocation of scarce healthcare resources? This article develops and evaluates four arguments in favour of such a priority. These pertain to public values, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  38
    Disease Entity” as the Key Theoretical Concept of Medicine.Peter Hucklenbroich - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (6):609-633.
    Philosophical debates about the concept of disease, particularly of mental disease, might benefit from reconsideration and a closer look at the established terminology and conceptual structure of contemporary medical pathology and clinical nosology. The concepts and principles of medicine differ, to a considerable extent, from the ideas and notions of philosophical theories of disease. In medical theory, the concepts of disease entity and pathologicity are, besides the concept of disease itself, of fundamental importance, and they (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  15.  17
    The Diseases of Personality.Th Ribot - 1894 - Philosophical Review 3:763.
  16.  2
    The Misterious Disease of Frances K.Victor Mota - manuscript
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  32
    Rethinking “Disease”: A Fresh Diagnosis and a New Philosophical Treatment.Russell Powell & Eric Scarffe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (9):579-588.
    Despite several decades of debate, the concept of disease remains hotly contested. The debate is typically cast as one between naturalism and normativism, with a hybrid view that combines elements of each staked out in between. In light of a number of widely discussed problems with existing accounts, some theorists argue that the concept of disease is beyond repair and thus recommend eliminating it in a wide range of practical medical contexts. Any attempt to reframe the ‘disease (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  18.  34
    Poverty, Disease, and Medicines in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: The Roles and Responsibilities of Pharmaceutical Corporations.Klaus M. Leisinger - 2012 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (1):135-185.
    Providing access to medicines and health care is one of the most challenging issues facing society today. In this paper the author highlights some of the complexities of the health value chain as well as the problems that the world’s poor have in terms of access to medical care and medicines. He then attempts to delineate the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders in order to define the specific corporate responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies in the context of the entire responsibility (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Evolution, Dysfunction, and Disease: A Reappraisal.Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 69 (2):301-327.
    Some ‘naturalist’ accounts of disease employ a biostatistical account of dysfunction, whilst others use a ‘selected effect’ account. Several recent authors have argued that the biostatistical account offers the best hope for a naturalist account of disease. We show that the selected effect account survives the criticisms levelled by these authors relatively unscathed, and has significant advantages over the BST. Moreover, unlike the BST, it has a strong theoretical rationale and can provide substantive reasons to decide difficult cases. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  20. Expert System for Castor Diseases and Diagnosis.Fatima M. Salman & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Engineering and Information Systems (IJEAIS) 3 (3):1-10.
    Background: The castor bean is a large grassy or semi-wooden shrub or small tree. Any part of the castor plant parts can suffering from a disease that weakens the ability to grow and eliminates its production. Therefore, in this paper will identify the pests and diseases present in castor culture and detect the symptoms in each disease. Also images is showing the symptom form in this disease. Objectives: The main objective of this expert system is to obtain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  21.  35
    Diseases Are Not Adaptations and Neither Are Their Causes.Paul E. Griffiths & John Matthewson - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (3):136-142.
    In a recent article in this journal, Zachary Ardern criticizes our view that the most promising candidate for a naturalized criterion of disease is the "selected effects" account of biological function and dysfunction. Here we reply to Ardern’s criticisms and, more generally, clarify the relationship between adaptation and dysfunction in the evolution of health and disease.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  22. Parkinson’s Disease Prediction Using Artificial Neural Network.Ramzi M. Sadek, Salah A. Mohammed, Abdul Rahman K. Abunbehan, Abdul Karim H. Abdul Ghattas, Majed R. Badawi, Mohamed N. Mortaja, Bassem S. Abu-Nasser & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (1):1-8.
    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. The symptoms generally come on slowly over time. Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking. Doctors do not know what causes it and finds difficulty in early diagnosing the presence of Parkinson’s disease. An artificial neural network system with back propagation algorithm is presented in this paper for helping (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  37
    Dysfunction, Disease, and the Limits of Selection.Zachary Ardern - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (1):4-9.
    Paul Griffiths and John Matthewson argue that selected effects play the key role in determining whether a state is pathological. In response, it is argued that a selected effects account faces a number of difficulties in light of modern genomic research. Firstly, a modern history approach to selection is problematic as a basis for assigning function to human traits in light of the small population sizes in the hominin lineage, which imply that selection has played a limited role in shaping (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24. Explaining Disease: Correlations, Causes, and Mechanisms. [REVIEW]Paul Thagard - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (1):61-78.
    Why do people get sick? I argue that a disease explanation is best thought of as causal network instantiation, where a causal network describes the interrelations among multiple factors, and instantiation consists of observational or hypothetical assignment of factors to the patient whose disease is being explained. This paper first discusses inference from correlation to causation, integrating recent psychological discussions of causal reasoning with epidemiological approaches to understanding disease causation, particularly concerning ulcers and lung cancer. It then (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  25.  92
    Is Disease a Natural Kind?Robert D'Amico - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (5):551-569.
    , Lawrie Reznek argues that disease is not a natural kind term. I raise objections to Reznek's two central arguments for establishing that disease is not a natural kind. In criticizing his a priori, conceptual argument against naturalism, I argue that his conclusion rests on a weaker argument that appeals to the empirical diversity in the symptoms and manifestations of disease. I also raise questions about the account of natural kinds which Reznek utilizes and his point that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  98
    Health, Disease, and Illness: Concepts in Medicine.Arthur Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) - 2004 - Georgetown University Press.
    Health, Disease, and Illness brings together a sterling list of classic and contemporary thinkers to examine the history, state, and future of ever-changing "concepts" in medicine.
  27.  18
    Rehabilitating Disease: Function, Value, and Objectivity in Medicine.Russell Powell & Eric Scarffe - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (5):1168-1178.
    The concept of disease remains hotly contested. In light of problems with existing accounts, some theorists argue that the disease concept ought to be eliminated. We answer this skeptical challenge by reframing the discussion in terms of the role that the disease concept plays in the complex network of health-care institutions in which it is deployed. We argue that while prevailing accounts do not suffer from the particular defects that critics have identified, they do suffer from other (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. Infectious Disease Control.Marcel Verweij & A. Dawson - 2011 - In Angus Dawson (ed.), Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice. New York, USA: Cambridge University Press. pp. 100-117.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  29.  5
    Disease and Value: A Rejection of the Value-Neutrality Thesis.George J. Agich - 1982 - Theoretical Medicine: An International Journal for the Philosophy and Methodology of Medical Research and Practice 4:27-41.
    RECENT PHILOSOPHICAL ATTENTION TO THE LANGUAGE OF DISEASE HAS FOCUSED PRIMARILY ON THE QUESTION OF ITS VALUE-NEUTRALITY OR NON-NEUTRALITY. PROPONENTS OF THE VALUE-NEUTRALITY THESIS SYMBOLICALLY COMBINE POLITICAL AND OTHER CRITICISMS OF MEDICINE IN AN ATTACK ON WHAT THEY SEE AS VALUE-INFECTED USES OF DISEASE LANGUAGE. THE PRESENT ESSAY ARGUES AGAINST TWO THESES ASSOCIATED WITH THIS VIEW: A METHODOLOGICAL THESIS WHICH TENDS TO DIVORCE THE ANALYSIS OF DISEASE LANGUAGE FROM THE CONTEXT OF THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND A (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  30.  33
    Defining Disease in the Context of Overdiagnosis.Mary Jean Walker & Wendy Rogers - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):269-280.
    Recently, concerns have been raised about the phenomenon of ‘overdiagnosis’, the diagnosis of a condition that is not causing harm, and will not come to cause harm. Along with practical, ethical, and scientific questions, overdiagnosis raises questions about our concept of disease. In this paper, we analyse overdiagnosis as an epistemic problem and show how it challenges many existing accounts of disease. In particular, it raises ques- tions about conceptual links drawn between disease and dysfunction, harm, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31. Unifying Diseases From a Genetic Point of View: The Example of the Genetic Theory of Infectious Diseases.Marie Darrason - 2013 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (4):327-344.
    In the contemporary biomedical literature, every disease is considered genetic. This extension of the concept of genetic disease is usually interpreted either in a trivial or genocentrist sense, but it is never taken seriously as the expression of a genetic theory of disease. However, a group of French researchers defend the idea of a genetic theory of infectious diseases. By identifying four common genetic mechanisms (Mendelian predisposition to multiple infections, Mendelian predisposition to one infection, and major gene (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  54
    Grounded Disease: Constructing the Social From the Biological in Medicine.Shane N. Glackin - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (275):258-276.
    Social Constructivism about the disease concept has generally been taken to ignore the fundamental biological reality underlying diseases, as well as to fall foul of several apparently compelling objections. In this paper, I explain how the metaphysical relation of grounding can be used to tie a socially constructed account of diseases and their classification to their underlying biological and behavioural states. I then generalize the position by disambiguating several varieties of normativism, including a particularly strong ‘placeholder’ version of social (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  41
    Disease, Dysfunction, and Synthetic Biology.Sune Holm - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (4):329-345.
    Theorists analyzing the concept of disease on the basis of the notion of dysfunction consider disease to be dysfunction requiring. More specifically, dysfunction-requiring theories of disease claim that for an individual to be diseased certain biological facts about it must be the case. Disease is not wholly a matter of evaluative attitudes. In this paper, I consider the dysfunction-requiring component of Wakefield’s hybrid account of disease in light of the artifactual organisms envisioned by current research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34.  34
    Alzheimer Disease and Pre-Emptive Suicide.Dena S. Davis - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):543-549.
    There is a flood of papers being published on new ways to diagnose Alzheimer disease before it is symptomatic, involving a combination of invasive tests , and pen and paper tests. This changes the landscape with respect to genetic tests for risk of AD, making rational suicide a much more feasible option. Before the availability of these presymptomatic tests, even someone with a high risk of developing AD could not know if and when the disease was approaching. One (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  35.  14
    Communicable Disease Surveillance Ethics in the Age of Big Data and New Technology.Gwendolyn L. Gilbert, Chris Degeling & Jane Johnson - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (2):173-187.
    Surveillance is essential for communicable disease prevention and control. Traditional notification of demographic and clinical information, about individuals with selected infectious diseases, allows appropriate public health action and is protected by public health and privacy legislation, but is slow and insensitive. Big data–based electronic surveillance, by commercial bodies and government agencies, which draws on a plethora of internet- and mobile device–based sources, has been widely accepted, if not universally welcomed. Similar anonymous digital sources also contain syndromic information, which can (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  36.  21
    Defining 'Health' and 'Disease'.Marc Ereshefsky - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (3):221-227.
    How should we define 'health' and 'disease'? There are three main positions in the literature. Naturalists desire value-free definitions based on scientific theories. Normativists believe that our uses of 'health' and 'disease' reflect value judgments. Hybrid theorists offer definitions containing both normativist and naturalist elements. This paper discusses the problems with these views and offers an alternative approach to the debate over 'health' and 'disease'. Instead of trying to find the correct definitions of 'health' and 'disease' (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  37. Biomedical Research, Neglected Diseases, and Well-Ordered Science.Julian Reiss & Philip Kitcher - 2009 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 24 (3):263-282.
    In this paper we make a proposal for reforming biomedical research that is aimed to align re-search more closely with the so-called fair-share principle according to which the proportions of global resources as-signed to different diseases should agree with the ratios of human suffering associated with those diseases.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  38. Disease and Value: A Rejection of the Value-Neutrality Thesis.George J. Agich - 1983 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (1).
    Recent philosophical attention to the language of disease has focused primarily on the question of its value-neutrality or non-neutrality. Proponents of the value-neutrality thesis symbolically combine political and other criticisms of medicine in an attack on what they see as value-infected uses of disease language. The present essay argues against two theses associated with this view: a methodological thesis which tends to divorce the analysis of disease language from the context of the practice of medicine and a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  39. Is Psychopathy a Mental Disease?Thomas Nadelhoffer & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 2013 - In Nicole Vincent (ed.), Neuroscience and legal responsibility. Oxford University Press. pp. 229–255.
    Whether psychopathy is a mental disease or illness can affect whether psychiatrists should treat it and whether it could serve as the basis for an insanity defense in criminal trials. Our understanding of psychopathy has been greatly improved in recent years by new research in psychology and neuroscience. This illuminating research enables us to argue that psychopathy counts as a mental disease on any plausible account of mental disease. In particular, Szasz's and Pickard's eliminativist views and Sedgwick's (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  40.  35
    Defining Disease: Much Ado About Nothing?Jennifer Worrall & John Worrall - 2001 - In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 33--55.
  41. On Infantile Diseases and Senile Diagnoses: The Case of Horton and Filsoufi.Paul Piccone - 1977 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 33:145.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Causal Classification of Diseases.Andrej Poleev - 2020
    „Errors are the greatest obstacles to the progress of science; to correct such errors is of more practical value than to achieve new knowledge,“ asserted Eugen Bleuler. Basic error of several prevailing classification schemes of pathological conditions, as for example ICD-10, lies in confusing and mixing symptoms with diseases, what makes them unscientific. Considering the need to bring order into the chaos and light into terminological obscureness, I introduce the Causal classification of diseases originating from the notion of bodily wholeness (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43. Diseases of the Understanding and the Need for Philosophical Therapy.Eugen Fischer - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (1):22-54.
    The paper develops and addresses a major challenge for therapeutic conceptions of philosophy of the sort increasingly attributed to Wittgenstein. To be substantive and relevant, such conceptions have to identify “diseases of the understanding” from which philosophers suffer, and to explain why these “diseases” need to be cured in order to resolve or overcome important philosophical problems. The paper addresses this challenge in three steps: With the help of findings and concepts from cognitive linguistics and cognitive psychology, it redevelops the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44.  62
    Biological Criteria of Disease: Four Ways of Going Wrong.John Matthewson & Paul Edmund Griffiths - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 1 (4).
    We defend a view of the distinction between the normal and the pathological according to which that distinction has an objective, biological component. We accept that there is a normative component to the concept of disease, especially as applied to human beings. Nevertheless, an organism cannot be in a pathological state unless something has gone wrong for that organism from a purely biological point of view. Biology, we argue, recognises two sources of biological normativity, which jointly generate four “ways (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  45.  83
    Disease-Mongering Through Clinical Trials.María González-Moreno, Cristian Saborido & David Teira - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 51:11-18.
    Why scientists reach an agreement on new experimental methods when there are conflicts of interest about the evidence they yield? I argue that debiasing methods play a crucial role in this consensus, providing a warrant about the impartiality of the outcome regarding the preferences of different parties involved in the experiment. From a contractarian perspective, I contend that an epistemic pre-requisite for scientists to agree on an experimental method is that this latter is neutral regarding their competing interests. I present (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  46.  57
    Disease as a Vague and Thick Cluster Concept.Geert Keil & Ralf Stoecker - 2017 - In Geert Keil, Lara Keuck & Rico Hauswald (eds.), Vagueness in Psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 46-74.
    This chapter relates the problem of demarcating the pathological from the non-pathological in psychiatry to the general problem of defining ‘disease’ in the philosophy of medicine. Section 2 revisits three prominent debates in medical nosology: naturalism versus normativism, the three dimensions of illness, sickness, and disease, and the demarcation problem. Sections 3–5 reformulate the demarcation problem in terms of semantic vagueness. ‘Disease’ exhibits vagueness of degree by drawing no sharp line in a continuum and is combinatorially vague (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  2
    “No Disease for the Others”: How COVID-19 Data Can Enact New and Old Alterities.Annalisa Pelizza - 2020 - Big Data and Society 7 (2).
    The COVID-19 pandemic invites a question about how long-standing narratives of alterity and current narratives of disease are entwined and re-enacted in the diagnosis of COVID-19. In this commentary, we discuss two related phenomena that, we argue, should be taken into account in answering this question. First, we address the diffusion of pseudoscientific accounts of minorities’ immunity to COVID-19. While apparently praising minorities’ biological resistance, such accounts rhetorically introduce a distinction between “Us” and “Them,” and in so doing produce (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. Reframing the Disease Debate and Defending the Biostatistical Theory.Peter H. Schwartz - 2014 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (6):572-589.
    Similarly to other accounts of disease, Christopher Boorse’s Biostatistical Theory (BST) is generally presented and considered as conceptual analysis, that is, as making claims about the meaning of currently used concepts. But conceptual analysis has been convincingly critiqued as relying on problematic assumptions about the existence, meaning, and use of concepts. Because of these problems, accounts of disease and health should be evaluated not as claims about current meaning, I argue, but instead as proposals about how to define (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  49.  83
    Evaluating Disease Management Programme Effectiveness: An Introduction to Instrumental Variables.Ariel Linden & John L. Adams - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (2):148-154.
  50. Diseases as Natural Kinds.Stefan Dragulinescu - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (5):347-369.
    In this paper, I focus on life-threatening medical conditions and argue that from the point of view of natural properties, induction(s), and participation in laws, at least some of the ill organisms dealt with in somatic medicine form natural kinds in the same sense in which the kinds in the exact sciences are thought of as natural. By way of comparing two ‘divisions of nature’, viz., a ‘classical’ exact science kind (gold) and a kind of disease (Graves disease), (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000