Results for 'Disease'

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  1. Should health research funding be proportional to the burden of disease?Joseph Millum - 2023 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 22 (1):76-99.
    Public funders of health research have been widely criticized on the grounds that their allocations of funding for disease-specific research do not reflect the relative burdens imposed by different diseases. For example, the US National Institutes of Health spends a much greater fraction of its budget on HIV/aids research and a much smaller fraction on migraine research than their relative contribution to the US burden of disease would suggest. Implicit in this criticism is a normative claim: Insofar as (...)
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  2.  72
    The Line-drawing Problem in Disease Definition.Wendy A. Rogers & Mary Jean Walker - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (4):405-423.
    Biological dysfunction is regarded, in many accounts, as necessary and perhaps sufficient for disease. But although disease is conceptualized as all-or-nothing, biological functions often differ by degree. A tension is created by attempting to use a continuous variable as the basis for a categorical definition, raising questions about how we are to pinpoint the boundary between health and disease. This is the line-drawing problem. In this paper, we show how the line-drawing problem arises within “dysfunction-requiring” accounts of (...)
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  3. Reproductive CRISPR does not cure disease.Tina Rulli - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (9):1072-1082.
    Given recent advancements in CRISPR‐Cas9 powered genetic modification of gametes and embryos, both popular media and scientific articles are hailing CRISPR’s life‐saving, curative potential for people with serious monogenic diseases. But claims that CRISPR modification of gametes or embryos, a form of germline engineering, has therapeutic value are deeply mistaken. This article explains why reproductive uses of CRISPR, and germline engineering more generally, do not treat or save lives that would otherwise have a genetic disease. Reproductive uses of CRISPR (...)
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  4. Justifications for Non-­Consensual Medical Intervention: From Infectious Disease Control to Criminal Rehabilitation.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2016 - Criminal Justice Ethics 35 (3):205-229.
    A central tenet of medical ethics holds that it is permissible to perform a medical intervention on a competent individual only if that individual has given informed consent to the intervention. However, in some circumstances it is tempting to say that the moral reason to obtain informed consent prior to administering a medical intervention is outweighed. For example, if an individual’s refusal to undergo a medical intervention would lead to the transmission of a dangerous infectious disease to other members (...)
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  5.  73
    Legal and Ethical Considerations in Allowing Parental Exemptions From Newborn Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) Screening.Lisa A. Hom, Tomas J. Silber, Kathleen Ennis-Durstine, Mary Anne Hilliard & Gerard R. Martin - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (1):11-17.
    Critical congenital heart disease screening is rapidly becoming the standard of care in the United States after being added to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel in 2011. Newborn screens typically do not require affirmative parental consent. In fact, most states allow parents to exempt their baby from receiving the required screen on the basis of religious or personally held beliefs. There are many ethical considerations implicated with allowing parents to exempt their child from newborn screening for CCHD. Considerations include (...)
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  6.  25
    On the triad disease, illness and sickness.Bj⊘ rn Hofmann - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (6):651-673.
  7.  60
    Q: Is Addiction a Brain Disease or a Moral Failing? A: Neither.Nick Heather - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):115-124.
    This article uses Marc Lewis’ work as a springboard to discuss the socio-political context of the brain disease model of addiction. The claim that promotion of the BDMA is the only way the general public can be persuaded to withhold blame and punishment from addicts is critically examined. After a discussion of public understandings of the disease concept of addiction, it is pointed out that it is possible to develop a scientific account of addiction which is neither a (...)
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  8.  18
    Theoretical and clinical disease and the biostatistical theory.Steven Tresker - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 82:101249.
  9. Beyond the Prevention of Harm: Animal Disease Policy as a Moral Question.Franck L. B. Meijboom, Nina Cohen, Elsbeth N. Stassen & Frans W. A. Brom - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):559-571.
    European animal disease policy seems to find its justification in a “harm to other” principle. Limiting the freedom of animal keepers—e.g., by culling their animals—is justified by the aim to prevent harm, i.e., the spreading of the disease. The picture, however, is more complicated. Both during the control of outbreaks and in the prevention of notifiable, animal diseases the government is confronted with conflicting claims of stakeholders who anticipate running a risk to be harmed by each other, and (...)
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  10.  48
    The overdiagnosis of what? On the relationship between the concepts of overdiagnosis, disease, and diagnosis.Bjørn Hofmann - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):453-464.
    Overdiagnosis and disease are related concepts. Widened conceptions of disease increase overdiagnosis and vice versa. This is partly because there is a close and complex relationship between disease and overdiagnosis. In order to address the problems with overdiagnosis, we may benefit from a closer understanding this relationship. Accordingly, the objective of this article is to elucidate the relationship between disease and overdiagnosis. To do so, the article starts with scrutinizing how overdiagnosis can explain the expansion of (...)
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  11.  77
    Free Will and the Brain Disease Model of Addiction: The Not So Seductive Allure of Neuroscience and Its Modest Impact on the Attribution of Free Will to People with an Addiction.Eric Racine, Sebastian Sattler & Alice Escande - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8:246537.
    Free will has been the object of debate in the context of addiction given that addiction could compromise an individual’s ability to choose freely between alternative courses of action. Proponents of the brain-disease model of addiction have argued that a neuroscience perspective on addiction reduces the attribution of free will because it relocates the cause of the disorder to the brain rather than to the person, thereby diminishing the blame attributed to the person with an addiction. Others have worried (...)
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  12.  28
    A Philosophical Disease: Bioethics, Culture and Identity.Knut Erik Tranøy, Carl Elliott & Knut Erik Tranoy - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (5):43.
  13.  64
    Use of broad consent and related procedures in genomics research: Perspectives from research participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Oliver Mweemba, John Musuku, Bongani M. Mayosi, Michael Parker, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Janet Seeley, Paulina Tindana & Jantina De Vries - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):184-199.
    ABSTRACT The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study (the RHDGen network) in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were conducted (...)
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  14.  25
    The “technoscientization” of medicine and its limits: technoscientific identities, biosocialities, and rare disease patient organizations.Peter Wehling - 2011 - Poiesis and Praxis 8 (2-3):67-82.
    The fact that the emergence of “technoscience,” resulting from the coalescing of science and technology, may have serious social and cultural impact has been debated in recent years particularly with regard to the field of medicine. The present article is exploring the scope and limits of the “technoscientization” of medicine using the example of rare disease patient associations. It is investigated whether and to what extent these organizations adopt technoscientific illness identities and subscribe to the research priorities and objectives (...)
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  15.  32
    Gaining and maintaining consent when capacity can be an issue: a research study with people with Huntington's disease.Eleanor Wilson, Kristian Pollock & Aimee Aubeeluck - 2010 - Clinical Ethics 5 (3):142-147.
    This paper recognizes the complexity of the debate on informed consent and discusses the importance of the ongoing process of consent for people affected by Huntington's disease (HD). Although written information may not be the most appropriate form of obtaining informed consent in qualitative research, it remains an important part of the ethical approval process for health research in the UK. This paper draws on a study in which the information sheet and consent form were specifically designed to help (...)
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  16.  17
    Editorial: Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19): The Mental Health, Resilience, and Communication Resources for the Short- and Long-term Challenges Faced by Healthcare Workers.Andrew E. P. Mitchell, Federica Galli, Chris Keyworth, Elena Vegni & Eduardo Salas - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
  17. Using Social Networking Sites for Communicable Disease Control: Innovative Contact Tracing or Breach of Confidentiality?K. L. Mandeville, M. Harris, H. L. Thomas, Y. Chow & C. Seng - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):47-50.
    Social media applications such as Twitter, YouTube and Facebook have attained huge popularity, with more than three billion people and organizations predicted to have a social networking account by 2015. Social media offers a rapid avenue of communication with the public and has potential benefits for communicable disease control and surveillance. However, its application in everyday public health practice raises a number of important issues around confidentiality and autonomy. We report here a case from local level health protection where (...)
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  18. The concept of disease.Dominic Sisti & Arthur L. Caplan - 2016 - In Miriam Solomon, Jeremy R. Simon & Harold Kincaid (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Medicine. Routledge.
  19.  71
    The Prototype Resemblance Theory of Disease.K. Sadegh-Zadeh - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (2):106-139.
    In a previous paper the concept of disease was fuzzy-logically analyzed and a sketch was given of a prototype resemblance theory of disease (Sadegh-Zadeh (2000). J. Med. Philos., 25:605–38). This theory is outlined in the present paper. It demonstrates what it means to say that the concept of disease is a nonclassical one and, therefore, not amenable to traditional methods of inquiry. The theory undertakes a reconstruction of disease as a category that in contradistinction to traditional (...)
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  20. CIDO: The Community-Based Coronavirus Infectious Disease Ontology.Yongqun He, Hong Yu, Edison Ong, Yang Wang, Yingtong Liu, Anthony Huffman, Hsin-hui Huang, Beverley John, Asiyah Yu Lin, Duncan William D., Sivaram Arabandi, Jiangan Xie, Junguk Hur, Xiaolin Yang, Luonan Chen, Gilbert S. Omenn, Brian Athey & Barry Smith - 2021 - Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Biomedical Ontologies (ICBO) and 10th Workshop on Ontologies and Data in Life Sciences (ODLS).
    Current COVID-19 pandemic and previous SARS/MERS outbreaks have caused a series of major crises to global public health. We must integrate the large and exponentially growing amount of heterogeneous coronavirus data to better understand coronaviruses and associated disease mechanisms, in the interest of developing effective and safe vaccines and drugs. Ontologies have emerged to play an important role in standard knowledge and data representation, integration, sharing, and analysis. We have initiated the development of the community-based Coronavirus Infectious Disease (...)
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  21.  34
    Use of broad consent and related procedures in genomics research: Perspectives from research participants in the Genetics of Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHDGen) study in a University Teaching Hospital in Zambia.Oliver Mweemba, John Musuku, Bongani M. Mayosi, Michael Parker, Rwamahe Rutakumwa, Janet Seeley, Paulina Tindana & Jantina De Vries - 2019 - Global Bioethics:1-16.
    The use of broad consent for genomics research raises important ethical questions for the conduct of genomics research, including relating to its acceptability to research participants and comprehension of difficult scientific concepts. To explore these and other challenges, we conducted a study using qualitative methods with participants enrolled in an H3Africa Rheumatic Heart Disease genomics study in Zambia to explore their views on broad consent, sample and data sharing and secondary use. In-depth interviews were conducted with RHDGen participants, study (...)
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  22. On the relevance and importance of the notion of disease.Lennart Nordenfelt - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (1).
    This paper constitutes a defence of the basic philosophical enterprise of characterising concepts such as disease and health, as well as other medical concepts. I argue that these concepts play important roles, not only in medical, but also in other scientific and social contexts. In particular, medical decisions about health and diseasehood have important ethical, social and economic consequences. The role played is, however, not always a rational one. But the greater is the need for a reconstruction of this (...)
     
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  23. What is disease.Lester S. King - 1981 - In Arthur L. Caplan, H. Tristram Engelhardt & James J. McCartney (eds.), Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Addison-Wesley, Advanced Book Program/World Science Division. pp. 107--118.
     
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  24. What Is Disease?James M. Humber & Robert F. Almeder - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):348-350.
     
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  25.  22
    A Postcard From Italy: Challenges and Psychosocial Resources of Partners Living With and Without a Chronic Disease During COVID-19 Epidemic.Giada Rapelli, Giulia Lopez, Silvia Donato, Ariela Francesca Pagani, Miriam Parise, Anna Bertoni & Raffaella Iafrate - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The new Coronavirus has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization. The sudden outbreak of this new virus and the measure of lockdown adopted to contain the epidemic have profoundly changed the lifestyles of the Italian population, with an impact on people’s quality of life and on their social relationships. In particular, due to forced and prolonged cohabitation, couples may be subject to specific stressors during the epidemic. In addition, living with a chronic health condition may add (...)
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  26.  31
    What systems biology can tell us about disease.Fridolin Gross - 2011 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (4).
    - A recent debate has touched upon the question of whether diseases can be understood as dysfunctional mechanisms or whether there are "pathological" mechanisms that deserve to be investigated and explained independently (Nervi 2010; Moghaddam Taaheri 2011). Here I suggest that both views tell us something important about disease but that in many instances only a systemic view can shed light on the relationship between physiology and pathology. I provide examples from the literature in systems biology in support of (...)
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  27.  57
    Neither desert nor disease.Stephen J. Morse - 1999 - Legal Theory 5 (3):265-309.
  28. Compassion in care: A qualitative study of older people with a chronic disease and nurses.M. van der Cingel - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (5):672-685.
    This article describes compassion as perceived within the relationship between nurses and older persons with a chronic disease. The aim of the study is to understand the benefit of compassion for nursing practice within the context of long-term care. The design of the study involves a qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with nurses and patients in three different care-settings. Results show the nature of compassion in seven dimensions: attentiveness, listening, confronting, involvement, helping, presence and understanding. Analysis of the data (...)
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  29.  49
    Advance directives as a tool to respect patients’ values and preferences: discussion on the case of Alzheimer’s disease.Corinna Porteri - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):9.
    The proposal of the new criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease based on biomarker data is making possible a diagnosis of AD at the mild cognitive impairment or predementia/prodromal– stage. Given the present lack of effective treatments for AD, the opportunity for the individuals to personally take relevant decisions and plan for their future before and if cognitive deterioration occurs is one the main advantages of an early diagnosis. Advance directives are largely seen as an effective tool for (...)
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  30. Ethical Implications of Alzheimer’s Disease Prediction in Asymptomatic Individuals Through Artificial Intelligence.Frank Ursin, Cristian Timmermann & Florian Steger - 2021 - Diagnostics 11 (3):440.
    Biomarker-based predictive tests for subjectively asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are utilized in research today. Novel applications of artificial intelligence (AI) promise to predict the onset of AD several years in advance without determining biomarker thresholds. Until now, little attention has been paid to the new ethical challenges that AI brings to the early diagnosis in asymptomatic individuals, beyond contributing to research purposes, when we still lack adequate treatment. The aim of this paper is to explore the ethical arguments put (...)
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  31.  18
    Patient Representation and Advocacy for Alzheimer Disease in Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Karin Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):369-380.
    This paper analyses self-declared aims and representation of dementia patient organizations and advocacy groups in relation to two recent upheavals: the critique of social stigmatization and biomedical research focusing on prediction. Based on twenty-six semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016–2017 with members, service recipients, and board representatives of POs in Germany and Israel, a comparative analysis was conducted, based on a grounded theory approach, to detect emerging topics within and across the POs and across national contexts. We identified a heterogeneous landscape, (...)
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  32. COVID-19 and Science Communication: The Recording and Reporting of Disease Mortality.Ognjen Arandjelovic - 2022 - Information 13 (2):97.
    The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has brought science to the fore of public discourse and, considering the complexity of the issues involved, with it also the challenge of effective and informative science communication. This is a particularly contentious topic, in that it is both highly emotional in and of itself; sits at the nexus of the decision-making process regarding the handling of the pandemic, which has effected lockdowns, social behaviour measures, business closures, and others; and concerns the recording and reporting of (...)
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  33.  15
    Treating Pain in Sickle Cell Disease with Opioids: Clinical Advances, Ethical Pitfalls.Wally R. Smith - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):139-146.
    Sickle cell disease is an autosomal recessive hemoglobinopathy found mainly in populations of African and Mediterranean descent, including approximately 100,000 Americans. It is also very common in Spanish-speaking regions of Central America, South America, and parts of the Caribbean, in Saudi Arabia, and in India and Sri Lanka. The disorder is characterized most commonly by lifelong recurrent unpredictable vaso-occlusive pain that may be disabling, and by chronic tissue damage and organ dysfunction. There are several genotypes of the disease. (...)
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  34.  42
    Rethinking the History of Peptic Ulcer Disease and its Relevance for Network Epistemology.Bartosz Radomski, Dunja Šešelja & Naumann Kim - forthcoming - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.
    The history of the research on peptic ulcer disease is characterized by a premature abandonment of the bacterial hypothesis, which subsequently had its comeback, leading to the discovery of Helicobacter pylori – the major cause of the disease. In this paper we examine the received view on this case, according to which the primary reason for the abandonment of the bacterial hypothesis in the mid-twentieth century was a large-scale study by a prominent gastroenterologist Palmer, which suggested no bacteria (...)
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  35.  92
    Nonlinearity in the epidemiology of complex health and disease processes.P. Philippe & O. Mansi - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):591-607.
    The challenges posed by chronic illness have pointed out to epidemiologists the multifactorial complex nature of disease causality. This notion has been referred to as a web of causality. This web extends theoretically beyond risk markers. It includes determinants of emergence/non-emergence of disease. This web of determinants is a form of complex system. Due to its complexity, the determinants within such system are not linked to each others in a linear, predictable manner only. Predictability is possible only on (...)
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  36.  18
    Geneticization in MIM/OMIM®? Exploring Historic and Epistemic Drivers of Contemporary Understandings of Genetic Disease.Rachel A. Ankeny - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (4):367-384.
    Prior to the genomic sequencing era, the bible for those working in clinical genetics was McKusick’s Mendelian Inheritance in Man, which appeared in multiple editions between the 1960s and the late 1990s. This catalogue was organized according to general patterns of inheritance and focused on phenotypes. Beginning in the mid-1980s, it was replaced by Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, a continuously updated catalogue documenting molecular relationships between genetic variation and phenotypic expression. This paper explores this resource’s evolution with attention to (...)
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  37.  19
    What Influence Could the Acceptance of Visitors Cause on the Epidemic Dynamics of a Reinfectious Disease?: A Mathematical Model.Ying Xie, Ishfaq Ahmad, ThankGod I. S. Ikpe, Elza F. Sofia & Hiromi Seno - 2024 - Acta Biotheoretica 72 (1):1-42.
    The globalization in business and tourism becomes crucial more and more for the economical sustainability of local communities. In the presence of an epidemic outbreak, there must be such a decision on the policy by the host community as whether to accept visitors or not, the number of acceptable visitors, or the condition for acceptable visitors. Making use of an SIRI type of mathematical model, we consider the influence of visitors on the spread of a reinfectious disease in a (...)
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  38. Improving the justice‐based argument for conducting human gene editing research to cure sickle cell disease.Berman Chan - 2019 - Bioethics 34 (2):200-202.
    In a recent article, Marilyn Baffoe-Bonnie offers three arguments for conducting CRISPR/Cas9 biotechnology research to cure sickle-cell disease (SCD) based on addressing historical and current injustices in SCD research and care. I show that her second and third arguments suffer from roughly the same defect, which is that they really argue for something else rather than for conducting CRISPR/Cas9 research in particular. For instance, the second argument argues that conducting this gene therapy research would improve the relationship between SCD (...)
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  39.  33
    Contextualized Autonomy and Liberalism: Broadening the Lenses on Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.Eric Racine, John Aspler, Cynthia Forlini & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-41.
    Concerns about the possibility of a sharp rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in Western nations have led to both the significant deployment of resources and the development of national research and healthcare plans. Although often focused on treatment, substantial efforts have also been dedicated toward preventing or delaying AD onset. As a result, recent technological and biomedical advances have greatly improved the understanding of AD pathophysiology. While some new tests can assess only risk ), some tests for (...)
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  40.  28
    Can Healthcare Workers Reasonably Question the Duty to Care Whilst Healthcare Institutions Take a Reactive Approach to Infectious Disease Risks?Michael Millar & Desmond T. S. Hsu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (1):94-98.
    Healthcare workers carry a substantial risk of harm from infectious disease, particularly, but not exclusively, during outbreaks. More can be done by healthcare institutions to identify risks, quantify the current burden of preventable infectious disease amongst HCWs and identify opportunities for prevention. We suggest that institutional obligations should be clarified with respect to the mitigation of infectious disease risks to staff, and question the duty of HCWs to care while healthcare institutions persist with a reactive rather than (...)
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  41.  14
    A Conditional Process Model to Explain Somatization During Coronavirus Disease 2019 Epidemic: The Interaction Among Resilience, Perceived Stress, and Sex.Fangfang Shangguan, Chenhao Zhou, Wei Qian, Chen Zhang, Zhengkui Liu & Xiang Yang Zhang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    BackgroundMore than 15% of Chinese respondents reported somatic symptoms in the last week of January 2020. Promoting resilience is a possible target in crisis intervention that can alleviate somatization.ObjectivesThis study aims to investigate the relationship between resilience and somatization, as well as the underlying possible mediating and moderating mechanism, in a large sample of Chinese participants receiving a crisis intervention during the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic.MethodsParticipants were invited online to complete demographic information and questionnaires. The Symptom Checklist-90 somatization subscale, (...)
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  42.  13
    Von ‚Fehlanpassungen‘ und ‚metabolischen Ghettos‘: Zur Konzeptualisierung globaler Gesundheitsunterschiede im Feld der Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.Michael Penkler & Ruth Müller - 2018 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 41 (3):258-278.
    On ‘Mismatch’ and ‘Metabolic Ghettos:’ The Conceptualization of Global Health Differences in Research on the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease. Epigenetic approaches to human health have received growing attention in the past two decades. They allow to view the development of human organisms as plastic, i.e. as open to influences from the social and material environment such as nutrition, stress, and trauma. This has lent new credence to approaches in biomedicine that aim to draw attention to the importance (...)
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  43.  52
    Between truth and hope: on Parkinson’s disease, neurotransplantation and the production of the ‘self’.Tiago Moreira & Paolo Palladino - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (3):55-82.
    In this article, we argue that contemporary biomedicine is shaped by two, seemingly incommensurable, organizational logics, the ‘regime of truth’ and the ‘regime of hope’. We articulate their features by drawing on debates sparked by the recent clinical trial of a new approach to the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. We also argue that the ‘self’ is configured in the very same process whereby these two organizational logics interlock and become mutually dependent, so that the ‘self’ might be said to (...)
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  44.  34
    Dilemmas in Dual Disease: Complexity and Futility in Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Substance Use Disorder.James N. Kirkpatrick & Jason W. Smith - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):76-78.
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  45. What is disease?James M. Humber & Robert F. Almeder - 1998 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (1):131.
     
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  46.  35
    Do French lay people and health professionals find it acceptable to breach confidentiality to protect a patient's wife from a sexually transmitted disease?M. Guedj - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (7):414-419.
    Objective: To determine under what conditions lay people and health professionals find it acceptable for a physician to breach confidentiality to protect the wife of a patient with a sexually transmitted disease .Methods: In a study in France, breaching confidentiality in 48 scenarios were accepted by 144 lay people, 10 psychologists and 7 physicians. The scenarios were all possible combinations of five factors: severity of the disease ; time taken to discuss this with ; intent to inform the (...)
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  47. Meniere's Disease: Diagnosis, Natural History, and Current Management.Lance E. Jackson, Herbert Silverstein & Richard Gans - forthcoming - Ethics.
  48.  7
    The Misfortunes of Others: End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom.Thomas Halper - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this important study, first published in 1989, Thomas Halper examines the policies and practices of the British National Health Services in treating kidney disease. Technological advances since the 1960s mean that end-stage renal disease, an otherwise fatal condition, can usually be treated successfully. In Britain, however, the availability of resources necessary for treatment has been limited in past years and many people have gone untreated. Professor Halper discusses a number of issues, both ethical and political, that arise (...)
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  49.  34
    The Quantitative Problem for Theories of Dysfunction and Disease.Thomas Schramme - 2021 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 17 (2):(SI7)5-30.
    Mnoge biološke funkcije dopuštaju stupnjevanje. Na primjer, lučenje određenog hormona u organizmu može biti na višoj ili nižoj razini, u usporedbi s istim organizmom drugom prilikom ili u usporedbi s drugim organizmima. Koje razine funkcioniranja predstavljaju slučajeve disfunkcije; gdje da povučemo crtu? To je kvantitativni problem za teorije disfunkcije i bolesti. Cilj mi je braniti verziju bioloških teorija disfunkcije kako bih se uhvatio u koštac s ovim problemom. Međutim, također ću dopustiti da evaluativna razmatranja uđu u teoriju bolesti. Moj argument (...)
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  50.  21
    Ethics Education for Successful Infectious Disease Control of COVID-19.Hannah YeeFen Lim - 2020 - Asian Bioethics Review 12 (2):243-251.
    The infection rates of COVID-19 have been exponential in some countries despite the imposition of infectious disease control measures such as lockdowns and physical distancing, which form one of the basic principles of public health and infectious disease control. There have been significant problems with leaders and citizenry deliberately ignoring and not complying with such measures and which have directly resulted in sudden rises in infection numbers. Here, I show the nature and extent of the widespread problem and (...)
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