Results for 'Disinformation'

173 found
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  1. Combating Disinformation with AI: Epistemic and Ethical Challenges.Benjamin Lange & Ted Lechterman - 2021 - IEEE International Symposium on Ethics in Engineering, Science and Technology (ETHICS) 1:1-5.
    AI-supported methods for identifying and combating disinformation are progressing in their development and application. However, these methods face a litany of epistemic and ethical challenges. These include (1) robustly defining disinformation, (2) reliably classifying data according to this definition, and (3) navigating ethical risks in the deployment of countermeasures, which involve a mixture of harms and benefits. This paper seeks to expose and offer preliminary analysis of these challenges.
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  2.  40
    How disinformation kills: philosophical challenges in the post-Covid society.Miguel Palomo - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (2):1-5.
    The paper argues that the large extent of disinformation has increased the number of deaths from coronavirus due to the proliferation of hoaxes spread via digital tools and media. It is noted that this problem could worsen in the post-COVID society and as such should be understood as having significant political import. Moreover, the phenomenon of disinformation has raised ethical questions around how to actively prevent deaths indirectly caused by hoaxes, as well as epistemological questions around maintaining criteria (...)
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  3. Beyond belief: On disinformation and manipulation.Keith Raymond Harris - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    Existing analyses of disinformation tend to embrace the view that disinformation is intended or otherwise functions to mislead its audience, that is, to produce false beliefs. I argue that this view is doubly mistaken. First, while paradigmatic disinformation campaigns aim to produce false beliefs in an audience, disinformation may in some cases be intended only to prevent its audience from forming true beliefs. Second, purveyors of disinformation need not intend to have any effect at all (...)
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  4.  12
    Combatting disinformation with crisis communication : An analysis of Meta’s newsroom stories.Michaël Opgenhaffen - 2023 - Communications 48 (3):352-369.
    This study examines how Meta as a company of various social media platforms communicates the disinformation crisis. Social media platforms are seen as a breeding ground for disinformation, and companies like Meta risk not only suffering reputational damage but also being further regulated by national and international legislation. We consider in this paper the news stories that Meta posted on the topic of disinformation on its own website between 2016 and 2022 as crisis communication, and build on (...)
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  5.  10
    Disinformation as a Tool of Hybrid Warfare: Essence and Consequences.Vitaly Krikun & Tamila Baulina - 2022 - Bulletin of Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv Philosophy 2 (7):30-33.
    The article examines a number of issues related to the specifics of information dissemination under the conditions of communicative practice of both an individual level and the functioning of mass media. The main attention is paid to the issue of the deliberate spread of disinformation. In this context, the phenomenon of "hybrid war" and the place of the information component in it, the issue of using narratives as an effective means of mass information damage, and the specifics of the (...)
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  6.  79
    Knowledge and Disinformation.Mona Simion - forthcoming - Episteme:1-12.
    This paper develops a novel account of the nature of disinformation that challenges several widely spread theoretical assumptions, such as that disinformation is a species of information, a species of misinformation, essentially false or misleading, essentially intended/aimed/having the function of generating false beliefs in/misleading hearers. The paper defends a view of disinformation as ignorance generating content: on this account, X is disinformation in a context C iff X is a content unit communicated at C that has (...)
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  7. Social media disinformation and the security threat to democratic legitimacy.Regina Rini - 2019 - NATO Association of Canada: Disinformation and Digital Democracies in the 21st Century:10-14.
    This short piece draws on political philosophy to show how social media interference operations can be used by hostile states to weaken the apparent legitimacy of democratic governments. Democratic societies are particularly vulnerable to this form of attack because democratic governments depend for their legitimacy on citizens' trust in one another. But when citizen see one another as complicit in the distribution of deceptive content, they lose confidence in the epistemic preconditions for democracy. The piece concludes with policy recommendations for (...)
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  8. Disinformation narratives as evidence-free claims : a socio-rhetorical perspective.Richard K. Ghere - 2020 - In Carole L. Jurkiewicz, Stuart Gilman & Carol W. Lewis (eds.), Global corruption and ethics management: translating theory into action. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.
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  9. What is Disinformation?Don Fallis - 2015 - Library Trends 63 (3):401-426.
    Prototypical instances of disinformation include deceptive advertising (in business and in politics), government propaganda, doctored photographs, forged documents, fake maps, internet frauds, fake websites, and manipulated Wikipedia entries. Disinformation can cause significant harm if people are misled by it. In order to address this critical threat to information quality, we first need to understand exactly what disinformation is. This paper surveys the various analyses of this concept that have been proposed by information scientists and philosophers (most notably, (...)
     
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  10. Disinformation: The use of false information. [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):231-240.
    The distinction between misinformation and disinformation becomes especially important in political, editorial, and advertising contexts, where sources may make deliberate efforts to mislead, deceive, or confuse an audience in order to promote their personal, religious, or ideological objectives. The difference consists in having an agenda. It thus bears comparison with lying, because lies are assertions that are false, that are known to be false, and that are asserted with the intention to mislead, deceive, or confuse. One context in which (...)
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  11.  14
    Epistemic Injustice and Digital Disinformation: Addressing Knowledge Inequities in the Digital Age.Sugeng Sugeng, Annisa Fitria & Selam Bastomi - 2024 - Diskursus - Jurnal Filsafat dan Teologi STF Driyarkara 20 (1):134-168.
    This research scrutinizes the repercussions of digital disinformation on knowledge disparities and delves into strategies aimed at fostering epistemic justice. The examination of the findings will involve a comprehensive exploration of various ethical frameworks and theories. This analytical approach seeks to identify the underlying ethical issues that may be inherent in the results. Ethical frameworks provide a structured lens through which we can evaluate the implications of the findings on different stakeholders, ensuring a thorough understanding of potential ethical dilemmas. (...)
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  12.  59
    Mis- and disinformation in a bounded confidence model.Igor Douven & Rainer Hegselmann - 2021 - Artificial Intelligence 291 (C):103415.
  13.  9
    Protecting democracy from disinformation: Implications for a model of communication.Lydia Sánchez & Sergio Villanueva Baselga - 2023 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 14 (1):5-20.
    This article analyses the consequences that disinformation phenomena have for a model of communication, focusing on the dangers that disinformation poses to democratic societies, especially when it is disseminated by the media. Disinformation is examined here from the perspective of social cognitive psychology, with special attention to the role played by motivated reasoning and confirmation bias in human cognition. From this perspective, disinformation phenomena should be studied not only through an analysis of how the media operate, (...)
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  14.  10
    From Dezinformatsiya to Disinformation: A Critical Analysis of Strategies and Effect on the Digital Public Sphere.Suania Acampa - 2024 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
    The book takes a critical look at the phenomenon of disinformation by identifying the historical, technological and human elements that contribute to the current success of disinformation strategies. The author examines the origin of the word "Dezinformatsiya", used by Russian planners in the 1950s, to understand how military strategy has transformed into militarization of information. The book pays particular attention to the power of algorithmic platforms on the selection and dissemination of digital content and their role in the (...)
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  15.  17
    Does credibility become trivial when the message is right? Populist radical-right attitudes, perceived message credibility, and the spread of disinformation.Clara Christner - forthcoming - Communications.
    Individuals with populist radical-right (PRR) attitudes seem particularly inclined to spread disinformation. However, it is unclear whether this is due to the large amount of disinformation with a PRR bias or a general tendency to perceive disinformation as credible and/or spread it further. This study explores (1) effects of a PRR bias on perceived message credibility and likelihood of spreading disinformation, (2) the extent to which perceived message credibility mediates the spread of disinformation, (3) effects (...)
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  16. What makes audiences resilient to disinformation? Integrating micro, meso, and macro factors based on a systematic literature review.Jülide Kont, Wim Elving, Marcel Broersma & Çiğdem Bozdağ - forthcoming - Communications.
    Despite increased attention since 2015, there is little consensus on why audiences believe or share disinformation. In our study, we propose a shift in analytical perspective by applying the concept of resilience. Through a systematic literature review (n = 95), we identify factors that have been linked to individuals’ resilience and vulnerability to disinformation thus far. Our analysis reveals twelve factors: thinking styles, political ideology, worldview and beliefs, pathologies, knowledge, emotions, (social) media use, demographics, perceived control, trust, culture, (...)
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  17. Floridi on Disinformation.Don Fallis - 2011 - Etica and Politica / Ethics and Politics (2):201-214.
  18.  95
    A unified account of information, misinformation, and disinformation.Sille Obelitz Søe - 2019 - Synthese 198 (6):5929-5949.
    In this paper I develop and present a unified account of information, misinformation, and disinformation and their interconnections. The unified account is rooted in Paul Grice’s notions of natural and non-natural meaning (in: Grice (ed) Studies in the way of words. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, pp 213–223, 1957) and a corresponding distinction between natural and non-natural information (Scarantino and Piccinini in Metaphilosophy 41(3):313–330, 2010). I argue that we can specify at least three specific kinds of non-natural information. Thus, as (...)
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  19.  10
    The contextual interplay between advertising and online disinformation: How brands suffer from and amplify deceptive content.Brahim Zarouali - forthcoming - Communications.
    The proliferation of online disinformation has become of major societal concern. Because of online programmatic algorithms, brands may find their ads running on disinformation websites alongside disinformation. In this experimental study (N = 617), we investigate people’s brand-related and news-related responses in this context. Results show that when an advertised brand is displayed on the same webpage as a disinformation article, brand attitude and brand trust are negatively affected; this effect is even more pronounced when the (...)
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  20.  44
    Online astroturfing: A problem beyond disinformation.Jovy Chan - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (3):507-528.
    Coordinated inauthentic behaviours online are becoming a more serious problem throughout the world. One common type of manipulative behaviour is astroturfing. It happens when an entity artificially creates an impression of widespread support for a product, policy, or concept, when in reality only limited support exists. Online astroturfing is often considered to be just like any other coordinated inauthentic behaviour; with considerable discussion focusing on how it aggravates the spread of fake news and disinformation. This paper shows that astroturfing (...)
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  21.  10
    Online astroturfing: A problem beyond disinformation.Jovy Chan - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (3):507-528.
    Coordinated inauthentic behaviours online are becoming a more serious problem throughout the world. One common type of manipulative behaviour is astroturfing. It happens when an entity artificially creates an impression of widespread support for a product, policy, or concept, when in reality only limited support exists. Online astroturfing is often considered to be just like any other coordinated inauthentic behaviour; with considerable discussion focusing on how it aggravates the spread of fake news and disinformation. This paper shows that astroturfing (...)
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  22.  6
    Online astroturfing: A problem beyond disinformation.Jovy Chan - 2024 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 50 (3):507-528.
    Coordinated inauthentic behaviours online are becoming a more serious problem throughout the world. One common type of manipulative behaviour is astroturfing. It happens when an entity artificially creates an impression of widespread support for a product, policy, or concept, when in reality only limited support exists. Online astroturfing is often considered to be just like any other coordinated inauthentic behaviour; with considerable discussion focusing on how it aggravates the spread of fake news and disinformation. This paper shows that astroturfing (...)
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  23.  5
    India’s Floating Disinformation during the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ashish Sharma - 2022 - Journal of Media Ethics 37 (2):145-147.
    Viral diffusion of fake news is very significant in India with its 1.38 billion population, because it impacts how the public receives information required to make responsible, informed decisions a...
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  24.  6
    Transcendence: the disinformation encyclopedia of transhumanism and the singularity.R. U. Sirius - 2015 - San Francisco, CA: Disinformation Books, an imprint of Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC. Edited by Jay Cornell.
    In nearly ninety A-Z entries, Transcendence provides a multilayered look at the accelerating advances in artificial intelligence, cognitive science, genomics, information technology, nanotechnology, neuroscience, space exploration, synthetic biology, robotics, and virtual worlds that are making transhumanism a reality. Entries range from Cloning and Cyborg Feminism to Designer Babies and Memory-Editing Drugs. In addition, the book notes historical predecessors and personalities, both in mythology and history--ranging from Timothy Leary to Ray Kurzweil. It also introduces the culture around transhumanism, covering all the (...)
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  25.  19
    Liars, Skeptics, Cheerleaders: Human Rights Implications of Post-Truth Disinformation from State Officials and Politicians.Nicky Deluggi & Cameran Ashraf - 2023 - Human Rights Review 24 (3):365-387.
    The purpose of this paper is to philosophically examine how disinformation from state officials and politicians affects the right to access to information and political participation. Next to the more straightforward implications for political self-determination, the paper examines how active dissemination of lies by figures of epistemic authority can be framed as a human rights issue and affects trust patterns between citizens, increases polarization, impedes dialogue, and obstructs access to politically relevant information by gatekeeping knowledge. Analyzing European Convention on (...)
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  26. The Myth of the Victim Public. Democracy contra Disinformation.Petr špecián - 2022 - Filozofia 77 (10):791-803.
    Do people fall for online disinformation, or do they actively utilize it as a tool to accomplish their goals? Currently, the notion of the members of the public as victims of deception and manipulation prevails in the debate. It emphasizes the need to limit people’s exposure to falsehoods and bolster their deficient reasoning faculties. However, the observed epistemic irrationality can also stem from politically motivated reasoning incentivized by digital platforms. In this context, the readily available disinformation facilitates an (...)
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  27.  36
    Ignorance and disinformation in the philosophy of biology: A reply to STENT. [REVIEW]Alexander Rosenberg - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (4):461-471.
  28.  14
    The public funding of schooling in Australia: myth, disinformation and lack of balance.K. G. Mortensen - 2002 - The Australasian Catholic Record 79 (1):87.
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  29.  16
    “Bad News” in Herodotos and Thoukydides: misinformation, disinformation, and propaganda.Donald Lateiner - 2021 - Journal of Ancient History 9 (1):53-99.
    Herodotos and Thoukydides report on many occasions that kings, polis leaders, and other politicians speak and behave in ways that unintentionally announce or analyze situations incorrectly (misinformation). Elsewhere, they represent as facts knowingly false constructs or “fake news” (disinformation), or they slant data in ways that advance a cause personal or public (propaganda, true or false). Historians attempt to or claim to acquaint audiences with a truer fact situation and to identify subjects’ motives for distortion such as immediate personal (...)
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  30.  15
    The Use of Non-verbal Displays in Framing COVID-19 Disinformation in Europe: An Exploratory Account.Delia Dumitrescu & Mina Trpkovic - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    While online disinformation practices have grown exponentially over the past decade, the COVID-19 pandemic provides arguably the best opportunity to date to study such communications at a cross-national level. Using the data provided by the International Fact-Checking Network, we examine the strategic uses of non-verbal and verbal arguments to push disinformation through social media and websites during the first wave of lockdowns in 2020 across 16 European countries. Our paper extends the work by Brennen et al. on the (...)
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  31.  34
    How China’s cognitive warfare works: A frontline perspective of Taiwan’s anti-disinformation wars.Tzu-Chieh Hung & Tzu-wei Hung - 2022 - Journal of Global Security Studies 7 (4):1-18.
    Cognitive warfare—controlling others’ mental states and behaviors by manipulating environmental stimuli—is a significant and ever-evolving issue in global conflict and security, especially during the COVID-19 crisis. In this article, we aim to contribute to the field by proposing a two-dimensional framework to evaluate China's cognitive warfare and explore promising ways of counteracting it. We first define the problem by clarifying relevant concepts and then present a case study of China's attack on Taiwan. Next, based on predictive coding theory from the (...)
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  32.  8
    “...delivered from the lie of being truth”: The Affective Force of Disinformation, Stickiness and Dissensus in Randy Ribay’s Patron Saints of Nothing.Vincent Pacheco & Jeremy De Chavez - 2021 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 11:84-96.
    Waged in 2016, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs has claimed over 20,000 lives according to human rights groups. The Duterte administration’s own count is significantly lower: around 6,000. The huge discrepancy between the government’s official count and that of arguably more impartial organizations about something as concretely material as body count is symptomatic of how disinformation is central to the Duterte administration and how it can sustain the approval of the majority of the Philippine electorate. We suggest (...)
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  33.  8
    Destructive storytelling: disinformation and the Eurosceptic myth that shaped Brexit: by Imke Henkel, Cham, Switzerland, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 197 + vi pp., €99.99 (hardcover), ISBN 978-3-030-69502-6. [REVIEW]Wenjuan Zhou - 2022 - Critical Discourse Studies 19 (6):689-691.
    Narratives as potential resources for enriching critical discourse studies (CDS hereafter) (Forchtner, 2021) can promise critical discourse analysts three ways of storytelling as a vital approach t...
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  34.  13
    Confucian free expression and the threat of disinformation.David Elstein - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):568-579.
    At present, there is a wide divergence in attitudes toward free speech in countries strongly influenced by Confucianism. Japan, Korea, and Taiwan have fairly robust rights of free expression. Mainland China does not, strongly restricting speech that the government judges threatens State interests. I argue that although traditional Confucian scholars supported many restrictions on expression, Confucian philosophers actually have good reason to want to protect expression about values. Subsequently, I consider how to address the problem of disinformation while preserving (...)
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  35.  13
    Confucian free expression and the threat of disinformation.David Elstein - 2022 - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (4):568-579.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Volume 48, Issue 4, Page 568-579, May 2022. At present, there is a wide divergence in attitudes toward free speech in countries strongly influenced by Confucianism. Japan, Korea, and Taiwan have fairly robust rights of free expression. Mainland China does not, strongly restricting speech that the government judges threatens State interests. I argue that although traditional Confucian scholars supported many restrictions on expression, Confucian philosophers actually have good reason to want to protect expression about values. Subsequently, (...)
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  36. Lateral reading and monetary incentives to spot disinformation about science.Piero Ronzani, Folco Panizza, Carlo Martini, Tiffany Morisseau, Matteo Motterlini & Simone Mattavelli - 2022 - Scientific Reports 12 (1):5678.
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  37. Brave. Net. World: the Internet as a disinformation superhighway?Luciano Floridi - 1996 - The Electronic Library 14:509-514.
    This article is a modified version of a paper I gave to the conference Philosophy & Informatics - First Italian Conference on the use of ICT in philosophical disciplines, promoted by the Italian Philosophical Association (University of Rome "La Sapienza", 23-24 November, 1995).
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  38.  32
    A qualitative exploration into voters' ethical perceptions of political advertising: Discourse, disinformation, and moral boundaries. [REVIEW]Steven Kates - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (16):1871-1885.
    Political campaign advertising continues to be a controversial policy topic in advertising and marketing research. It is also a prime subject for investigating the ethical evaluations of consumers (or voters). The following study draws from postmodern communication theory and employs a qualitative research methodology in order to explore voters' intimate and subjective views about politics, candidates, and political advertising. The findings include emergent themes relating to significant media rituals in voters' lives, the cynical perspective of politics as a game, and (...)
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  39.  7
    Petros Iosifidis and Nicholas Nicoli (2021). Digital Democracy, Social Media and Disinformation. Routledge: New York and London. 155 pp. [REVIEW]Valentyna Shapovalova - 2023 - Communications 48 (4):630-631.
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  40. Boring language is constraining the impact of climate science.Quan-Hoang Vuong, Minh-Hoang Nguyen & Viet-Phuong La - 2024 - Ms Thoughts.
    Language, one of humanity’s major transformative innovations, is foundational for many cultural, artistic, scientific, and economic advancements, including the creation of artificial intelligence (AI). However, in the fight against climate change, the power of such innovation is constrained due to the boring language of climate science and science communication. In this essay, we encapsulated the situation and risks of boring language in communicating climate information to the public and countering climate denialism and disinformation. Based on the Serendipity-Mindsponge-3D knowledge management (...)
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  41. Climate hypocrisy and environmental integrity.Valentin Beck - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Accusations of hypocrisy are a recurring theme in the public debate on climate change, but their significance remains poorly understood. Different motivations are associated with this accusation, which is leveled by proponents and opponents of climate action. In this article, I undertake a systematic assessment of climate hypocrisy, with a focus on lifestyle and political hypocrisy. I contextualize the corresponding accusation, introduce criteria for the conceptual analysis of climate hypocrisy, and develop an evaluative framework that allows us to determine its (...)
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  42.  17
    Democratic Speech in Divided Times.Maxime Lepoutre - 2021 - OUP: Oxford University Press.
    In an ideal democracy, people from all walks of life would come together to talk meaningfully and respectfully about politics. But we do not live in an ideal democracy. In contemporary democracies, which are marked by deep social divisions, different groups for the most part avoid talking to each other. And when they do talk to each other, their speech often seems to be little more than a vehicle for rage, hatred, and deception. -/- Democratic Speech in Divided Times argues (...)
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  43. Information: Does it have to be true? [REVIEW]James H. Fetzer - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (2):223-229.
    Luciano Floridi (2003) offers a theory of information as a strongly semantic notion, according to which information encapsulates truth, thereby making truth a necessary condition for a sentence to qualify as information. While Floridi provides an impressive development of this position, the aspects of his approach of greatest philosophical significance are its foundations rather than its formalization. He rejects the conception of information as meaningful data, which entails at least three theses – that information can be false; that tautologies are (...)
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  44. No-Regret Learning Supports Voters’ Competence.Petr Spelda, Vit Stritecky & John Symons - forthcoming - Social Epistemology:1-17.
    Procedural justifications of democracy emphasize inclusiveness and respect and by doing so come into conflict with instrumental justifications that depend on voters’ competence. This conflict raises questions about jury theorems and makes their standing in democratic theory contested. We show that a type of no-regret learning called meta-induction can help to satisfy the competence assumption without excluding voters or diverse opinion leaders on an a priori basis. Meta-induction assigns weights to opinion leaders based on their past predictive performance to determine (...)
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  45.  9
    Crisis alert: (Dis)information selection and sharing in the COVID-19 pandemic.Lea-Johanna Klebba & Stephan Winter - forthcoming - Communications.
    High levels of threat and uncertainty characterize the onset of societal crises. Here, people are exposed to conflicting information in the media, including disinformation. Because individuals often base their news selection on pre-existing attitudes, the present study aims to examine selective exposure effects in the face of a crisis, and identify right-wing ideological, trust-, and science-related beliefs that might influence the selection and sharing of disinformation. A representative survey of German internet users (N = 1101) at the time (...)
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  46.  6
    Unreason: best of Skeptical Inquirer.Kendrick Frazier & Benjamin Radford (eds.) - 2023 - Lanham, MD: Prometheus.
    Unreason will arm readers with scientific knowledge to curb the misinformation and misconceptions that increasingly threaten our civil discourse. Even further, these essays present a way for us to be better citizens, equipped to deal with the winds of misinformation and disinformation swirling about us and better able to look ahead to a world where science and reason-indeed just good old common sense-can prevail.
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  47. Bilgi Kirliliği ve Bireysel Sorumluluk: Salgın Deneyimimiz.Alper Yavuz - 2020 - MSGSÜ Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi 2 (22):203-217.
    Özet: Bilgi kirliliği eski bir sorun olsa da sosyal medya ve Internet tabanlı mesajlaşma uygulamalarının yaygınlaşmasıyla daha sık gündeme gelmeye başladı. Salgın hastalık gibi kriz dönemlerinde kirli bilginin etkinliğinin tehlikeli olabilecek boyutta arttığı görüldü. Bu yazıda bilgi kirliliği sorununu felsefi açıdan inceleyeceğim. Bilgi kirliliğinin ne olduğu sorusunu tartıştıktan sonra bilgi kirliliğinin üç türü arasındaki ayrımları ele alacağım. Son olarak bilgi kaynağı ve bilgi aktarıcısı olarak bir öznenin sorumluluklarının neler olduğu konusunu inceleyeceğim. Tartışmanın pratik sonuçlarını salgın hastalık konusuyla bağlantılı örnekler seçerek (...)
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  48.  10
    The Brazilian Presidential Election of 2018 and the relationship between technology and democracy in Latin America.Raíssa Mendes Tomaz & Jerzui Mendes Torres Tomaz - 2020 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 18 (4):497-509.
    PurposeThe purpose of this paper selected by ICIL 2019 committee in Rome is to demonstrate the current importance of the internet in the protection of democracy in developting countries.Design/methodology/approachIt is intended to make a comparison with the growing and current phenomenon of Brazilian disinformation with other contemporary phenomena related to new technologies through literature review methodology.FindingsThe Brazilian elections in 2018 represent an authentic model in a post-Cambridge Analytical phase where the myth of the sanctity of data has been broken. (...)
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  49.  12
    Counterspeech: multidisciplinary perspectives on countering dangerous speech.Stefanie Ullmann & Marcus Tomalin (eds.) - 2023 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    This volume looks at the forms and functions of counterspeech as well as what determines its effectiveness and success from multidisciplinary perspectives. Counterspeech is in line with international human rights and freedom of speech and it can be a much more powerful tool against dangerous and toxic speech than blocking and censorship. In the face of online hate speech and disinformation, counterspeech is a tremendously important and timely topic. The book uniquely brings together expertise from a variety of disciplines. (...)
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  50.  15
    Moral Machines.Caroline Stockman & Paulo Vieira - 2022 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (1):97-112.
    Misinformation, disinformation, or fake news pose a new societal challenge. Through Kantian philosophy, we postulate this as an ethical challenge, one driven by social forces that shape social media’s use towards unethical knowledge production. However, automated or intelligent technologies can also be a solution in acting as a polygraph on social media platforms. We propose such technology could be ethical-by-design if we bring moral philosophy into a software architecture. Kant’s philosophical formalism is well-aligned with computing logic, especially blockchain applications. (...)
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