Results for 'Divine Command Theory'

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  1. The Euthyphro, Divine Command Theory and Moral Realism.Gerald K. Harrison - 2014 - Philosophy (1):107-123.
    Divine command theories of metaethics are commonly rejected on the basis of the Euthyphro problem. In this paper, I argue that the Euthyphro can be raised for all forms of moral realism. I go on to argue that this does not matter as the Euthyphro is not really a problem after all. I then briefly outline some of the attractions of a divine command theory of metaethics. I suggest that given one of the major reasons (...)
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  2. The Divine Command Theory and Objective Good.Bruce Reichenbach - 1984 - In Rocco Porreco (ed.), Georgetown Symposium on Ethics. University Press of America. pp. 219-233.
    I reply to criticisms of the divine command theory with an eye to noting the relation of ethics to an ontological ground. The criticisms include: the theory makes the standard of right and wrong arbitrary, it traps the defender of the theory in a vicious circle, it violates moral autonomy, it is a relic of our early deontological state of moral development. I then suggest how Henry Veatch's view of good as an ontological feature of (...)
     
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  3.  24
    On Justifying One’s Acceptance of Divine Command Theory.Dennis Plaisted - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (3):315-334.
    It has been alleged against divine command theory that we cannot justify our acceptance of it without giving it up. For if we provide moral reasons for our acceptance of God’s commands, then those reasons, and not God’s commands, must be our ultimate moral standard. Kai Nielsen has offered the most forceful version of this objection in his book, Ethics Without God. My principal aim is to show that Nielsen’s charge does not succeed. His argument crucially relies (...)
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  4. Divine Command Theory and Moral Supervenience.Blake McAllister - 2016 - Philosophia Christi 18 (1):65-78.
    Mark Murphy argues that the property identity version of divine command theory, coupled with the doctrine that God has freedom in commanding, violates the supervenience of the moral on the nonmoral. In other words, they permit two situations exactly alike in nonmoral facts to differ in moral facts. I give three arguments to show that a divine command theorist of this sort can consistently affirm moral supervenience. Each argument contends that there are always nonmoral differences (...)
     
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  5.  25
    A Jewish Modified Divine Command Theory.Kavka Martin & Rashkover Randi - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):387 - 414.
    We claim that divine command metaethicists have not thought through the nature of the expression of divine love with sufficient rigor. We argue, against prior divine command theories, that the radical difference between God and the natural world means that grounding divine command in divine love can only ground a formal claim of the divine on the human; recipients of revelation must construct particular commands out of this formal claim. While some (...)
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  6. Procedure, Substance, and the Divine Command Theory.Jeffery L. Johnson - 1994 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35 (1):39 - 55.
    Natural theology is still practiced as though substantive theological conclusions can be derived by a quasi-deductive process. Perhaps relevant "evidence" may lead to interesting theological conclusions -- the fact of natural evil, or the cosmic fine-tuning we hear about in contemporary cosmology, both cry out for theological explanation. I remain a skeptic, however, about the value of "a priori" methods in natural theology. The case study in this short discussion is the well known attempt to establish the logical incoherence of (...)
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  7. Supervenience and Property-Identical Divine-Command Theory.Michael J. Almeida - 2004 - Religious Studies 40 (3):323-333.
    Property-identical divine-command theory (PDCT) is the view that being obligatory is identical to being commanded by God in just the way that being water is identical to being H2O. If these identity statements are true, then they express necessary a posteriori truths. PDCT has been defended in Robert M. Adams (1987) and William Alston (1990). More recently Mark C. Murphy (2002) has argued that property-identical divine-command theory is inconsistent with two well-known and well-received theses: (...)
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  8.  37
    Is the Divine Command Theory Defensible?John Chandler - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):443.
    Recent defences of the Divine Command Theory have ranged from those which attempt to meet objections half-way, and in the process transform the theory, to restatements and defences of the theory in its full rigour. Philip Quinn's Divine Commands and Moral Requirements is one of the latter. Quinn's purpose is to show that the theory, in its several variants, can be stated precisely within several current systems of deontic logic, and that contrary to (...)
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  9. Kierkegaard and Divine-Command Theory: Replies to Quinn and Evans.R. Zachary Manis - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):289-307.
    One of the most important recent developments in the discussion of Kierkegaard's ethics is an interpretation defended, in different forms, by Philip Quinn and Stephen Evans. Both argue that a divine-command theory of moral obligation (DCT) is to be found in "Works of Love". Against this view, I argue that, despite significant overlap between DCT and the view of moral obligation found in "Works of Love", there is at least one essential difference between the two: the former, (...)
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  10. Richard Joyce's New Objections to the Divine Command Theory.Scott Hill - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):189-196.
    In a 2002 paper for this journal, Richard Joyce presents three new arguments against the Divine Command Theory. In this comment, I attempt to show that each of these arguments is either unpersuasive or uninteresting. Two of Joyce’s arguments are unpersuasive because they rely on an implausible principle or an implausible claim about what counts as a platitude governing use of the term “wrong.” Joyce’s other argument is uninteresting because it is persuasive only if Joyce’s formulation of (...)
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  11. Necessity, Control, and the Divine Command Theory.Dale Tuggy - 2005 - Sophia 44 (1):53-75.
    The simplest Divine Command Theory is one which identifies rightness with being commanded or willed by God. Two clear and appealing arguments for this theory turn on the idea that laws require a lawgiver, and the idea that God is sovereign or omnipotent. Critical examination of these arguments reveals some fundamental principles at odds with the Divine Command Theory, and yields some more penetrating versions of traditional objections to that theory.
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  12.  6
    Divine Command Theory in Early Franciscan Thought: A Response to the Autonomy Objection.Lydia Schumacher - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):461-476.
    In recent years, many scholars have bemoaned the gradual demise of traditional virtue ethics, and its eventual replacement in the later Middle Ages by divine command theory. Where virtue ethics nurtures a capacity for spontaneous moral judgement, this theory turns on adherence to ordained duties and laws. Thus, virtue ethicists among others have tended to object to the theory on the grounds that it undermines the role of the moral agent in moral adjudication. In this (...)
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  13.  33
    Divine Command Theory in the Passage of History.Simin Rahimi - 2009 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 14 (2):307-328.
    Are actions that are morally good, morally good because God makes them so ? Or does God urge humans to do them because they are morally good anyway? What is, in general, the relationship between divine commands and ethical duties? It is not an uncommon belief among theists that morality depends entirely on the will or commands of God: all moral facts consist exclusively in facts about his will or commands. Thus, not only is an action right because it (...)
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  14.  4
    Can God’s Goodness Save the Divine Command Theory From Euthyphro?Jeremy Koons - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (1):177--195.
    Recent defenders of the divine command theory like Adams and Alston have confronted the Euthyphro dilemma by arguing that although God’s commands make right actions right, God is morally perfect and hence would never issue unjust or immoral commandments. On their view, God’s nature is the standard of moral goodness, and God’s commands are the source of all obligation. I argue that this view of divine goodness fails because it strips God’s nature of any features that (...)
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  15.  51
    Divine Command Theory and Theistic Activism.Simin Rahimi - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (4):551-559.
    If the divine will is not subject to any principle, and God controls all truths including moral truths, morality will be arbitrary at the deepest level. It will not be possible to offer any explanation of why God has willed certain actions rather than their contraries. Throughout the history of philosophical debate there have been many attempts to support the dependence of moral truths on God's command (or divine command theory) and at the same time (...)
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  16.  45
    The Divine Command Theory of Mozi.Yong Li - 2006 - Asian Philosophy 16 (3):237 – 245.
    In this study, I will examine the famous 'divine command theory' of Mozi. Through the discussion of several important chapters of Mozi, including Fayi (law), Tianzhi (the will of heaven), Minggui (knowing the spirits) and Jianai (universal love), I attempt to clarify the arguments of Mozi offered in support of his distinctive ideas of serving heaven, knowing the spirits and loving all. The analysis shows that there are serious problems with his assumptions, hence they fail to support (...)
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  17. Divine Command Theory and the Semantics of Quantified Modal Logic.David Efird - 2009 - In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 91.
    I offer a series of axiomatic formalizations of Divine Command Theory motivated by certain methodological considerations. Given these considerations, I present what I take to be the best axiomatization of Divine Command Theory, an axiomatization which requires a non-standardsemantics for quantified modal logic.
     
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  18. A Critique of Graber's Divine Command Theory of Ethics.John P. Reeder - 1975 - Journal of Religious Ethics 3 (1):157-163.
    The author criticizes a divine command theory of moral obligation offered by Glenn C. Graber. Reeder opposes Graber's claim that divine righteousness can be understood independent of standards of moral obligation and questions the plausibility of basing moral obligation on unchecked command, even the commands of God. Speaking historically, he discusses the relation of this theory to the moral theory of Ockham.
     
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  19.  80
    Thomas Aquinas and Divine Command Theory.M. V. Dougherty - 2002 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:153-164.
    Nearly all attempts to include Aquinas among the class of divine command theorists have focused on two kinds of texts: those exhibiting Aquinas’s treatment of the apparent immoralities of the patriarchs (e.g., Abraham’s intention to kill Isaac), and those pertaining to Aquinas’s discussion of the divine will. In the present paper, I lay out a third approach unrelated to these two. I argue that Aquinas’s explicit endorsement of one ethical proposition as self-evident throughout his writings is sufficient (...)
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  20. Thomas Aquinas and Divine Command Theory.M. Dougherty - 2002 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 76:153-164.
    Nearly all attempts to include Aquinas among the class of divine command theorists have focused on two kinds of texts: those exhibiting Aquinas’s treatment of the apparent immoralities of the patriarchs, and those pertaining to Aquinas’s discussion of the divine will. In the present paper, I lay out a third approach unrelated to these two. I argue that Aquinas’s explicit endorsement of one ethical proposition as self-evident throughout his writings is sufficient justification to include Aquinas among the (...)
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  21.  75
    Counterpossibles and the ‘Terrible’ Divine Command Deity.Richard Brian Davis & W. Paul Franks - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (1):1-19.
    In a series of articles, Wes Morriston has launched what can only be considered a full-scale assault on the divine command theory (DCT) of morality. According to Morriston, proponents of this theory are committed to an alarming counterpossible: that if God did command an annual human sacrifice, it would be morally obligatory. Since only a ‘terrible’ deity would do such a ‘terrible’ thing, we should reject DCT. Indeed, if there were such a deity, the world (...)
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  22.  89
    Divine Desire Theory and Obligation.Christian Miller - 2009 - In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 105--24.
    Thanks largely to the work of Robert Adams and Philip Quinn, the second half of the twentieth century witnessed a resurgence of interest in divine command theory as a viable position in normative theory and meta-ethics. More recently, however, there has been some dissatisfaction with divine command theory even among those philosophers who claim that normative properties are grounded in God, and as a result alternative views have begun to emerge, most notably (...) intention theory (Murphy, Quinn) and divine motivation theory (Zagzebski). My goal here is to outline a distinct theory, divine desire theory, and suggest that, even if it is not clearly superior to these extant views, it is at least worthy of serious consideration.1 As far as this paper is concerned, the discussion will be limited just to the deontic status of actions (obligatory, permissible, forbidden), and so no attempt will be made to also account for axiological properties such as goodness or evil. In order to get oriented to the range of deontological views in this area, consider the following three rough characterizations. (shrink)
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  23.  16
    The Objectivity of Obligations in Divine Motivation Theory: On Imitation and Submission.Daniel M. Johnson - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):504-517.
    To support her divine motivation theory of the good, which seeks to ground ethics in motives and emphasize the attractiveness of morality over against the compulsion of morality, Linda Zagzebski has proposed an original account of obligations which grounds them in motives. I argue that her account renders obligations objectionably person-relative and that the most promising way to avoid my criticism is to embrace something quite close to a divine command theory of obligation. This requires (...)
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  24.  75
    Islamic Ethics: Divine Command Theory in Arabo-Islamic Thought.Mariam Attar - 2010 - Routledge.
    This book explores philosophical ethics in Arabo-Islamic thought.
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  25. Divine Command Theory.Philip L. Quinn - 2000 - In Hugh LaFollette - (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Ethical Theory. Blackwell. pp. 53--73.
     
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  26. A Modified Divine Command Theory of Ethical Wrongness.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1997 - In Thomas L. Carson & Paul K. Moser (eds.), Morality and the Good Life. Oup Usa.
     
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  27.  70
    A Trilemma for Divine Command Theory.Mark C. Murphy - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):22-31.
  28. A Defensible Divine Command Theory.Edward Wierenga - 1983 - Noûs 17 (3):387-407.
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  29.  38
    “Why Adams Needs to Modify His Divine-Command Theory One More Time”.Stephen J. Sullivan - 1994 - Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):72-81.
  30. Divine Command Theory.Michael W. Austin - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  31.  20
    The Divine Command Theory of Ethics and the Ideal Observer.Charles Taliaferro - 1983 - Sophia 22 (2):3-8.
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  32.  40
    Objective Values and the Divine Command Theory of Morality.Robert Burch - 1980 - New Scholasticism 54 (3):279-304.
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  33.  25
    Adam's Modified Divine Command Theory of Ethics.Michael Levine - 1994 - Sophia 33 (2):63-77.
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  34.  5
    The "Mandate of Heaven": Mencius and the Divine Command Theory of Political Legitimacy.A. T. Nuyen - unknown
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  35.  22
    The "Mandate of Heaven": Mencius and the Divine Command Theory of Political Legitimacy.A. T. Nuyen - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2):113-126.
    In Confucius' time, it was supposed that the sovereign had the mandate of heaven (tianming) to rule. Both Confucius and Mencius speak of a legitimate ruler as someone who has such a mandate and of a deposed ruler as someone who has lost it. Commentators have recently turned their attention to what the reference to the mandate of heaven means, as there are implications for the prospects of democracy in a Confucian state. The result is a wide spectrum of views. (...)
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  36.  21
    How Many Gods Does It Take? (To Discredit the Divine Command Theory).Laura M. Purdy - 1988 - Teaching Philosophy 11 (2):112-115.
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  37.  5
    Socrates's Refutation of Euthyphro's Divine Command Theory. 김상돈 - 2009 - Journal of Ethics 1 (74):125-162.
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  38.  28
    Concerning a New Version of the Divine Command Theory of Morality.Hardy Jones - 1980 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):195 - 205.
  39.  17
    Towards a Relocation of the Divine Command Theory.Karl Pfeifer - 1992 - Cogito 6 (2):67-69.
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  40.  18
    Utilitarianism and the Divine Command Theory.Edward Wierenga - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (4):311 - 318.
  41.  7
    An Argument for the Divine Command Theory of Right Action.Peter Forrest - 1989 - Sophia 28 (1):2-19.
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  42. Why Adams Needs to Modify His Divine-Command Theory One More Time.Stephen J. Sullivan - 1994 - Faith and Philosophy 11 (1):72-81.
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  43. Divine Commands or Divine Attitudes?Matthew Carey Jordan - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):159-70.
    In this essay, I present three arguments for the claim that theists should reject divine command theory in favor of divine attitude theory. First, DCT implies that some cognitively normal human persons are exempt from the dictates of morality. Second, it is incumbent upon us to cultivate the skill of moral judgment, a skill that fits nicely with the claims of DAT but which is superfluous if DCT is true. Third, an attractive and widely shared (...)
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  44.  40
    Divine Attitudes, Divine Commands, and the Modal Status of Moral Truths.Matthew Carey Jordan - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (1):45-60.
    This essay presents a theistic account of deontic properties that can lay claim to many of the advantages of divine command theory but which avoids its flaws. The account, divine attitude theory, asserts that moral properties should be understood in terms of agent-directed divine attitudes, such that it is morally wrong for an agent to perform an action just in case God would be displeased with the agent for performing that action. Among the virtues (...)
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  45. What If God Commanded Something Terrible? A Worry for Divine-Command Meta-Ethics.Wes Morriston - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):249-267.
    If God commanded something that was obviously evil, would we have a moral obligation to do it? I critically examine three radically different approaches divine-command theorists may take to the problem posed by this question: (1) reject the possibility of such a command by appealing to God's essential goodness; (2) avoid the implication that we should obey such a command by modifying the divine-command theory; and (3) accept the implication that we should obey (...)
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  46.  78
    Divine Command, Divine Will, and Moral Obligation.Mark C. Murphy - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (1):3-27.
    In this article I consider the respective merits of three interpretations of divine command theory. On DCT1, S’s being morally obligated to φ depends on God’s command that S φ; on DCT2, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S be morally obligated to φ; on DCT3, that moral obligation depends on God’s willing that S φ. I argue that the positive reasons that have been brought forward in favor of DCT1 have implications theists would (...)
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  47.  10
    What If God Commanded Something Terrible? A Worry for Divine-Command Meta-Ethics: Wes Morriston.Wes Morriston - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):249-267.
    If God commanded something that was obviously evil, would we have a moral obligation to do it? I critically examine three radically different approaches divine-command theorists may take to the problem posed by this question: reject the possibility of such a command by appealing to God's essential goodness; avoid the implication that we should obey such a command by modifying the divine-command theory; and accept the implication that we should obey such a (...) by appealing to divine transcendence and mystery. I show that each approach faces significant challenges, and that none is completely satisfying. (shrink)
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  48.  55
    Ockham as a Divine-Command Theorist.Thomas M. Osborne - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):1-22.
    Although this thesis is denied by much recent scholarship, Ockham holds that the ultimate ground of a moral judgement's truth is a divine command, rather than natural or non-natural properties. God could assign a different moral value not only to every exterior act, but also to loving God. Ockham does allow that someone who has not had access to revelation can make correct moral judgements. Although her right reason dictates what God in fact commands, she need not know (...)
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  49.  91
    Divine Command Morality and the Autonomy of Ethics.Robert Audi - 2007 - Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):121-143.
    This paper formulates a kind of divine command ethical theory intended to comport with two major views: that basic moral principles are necessary truths and that necessary truths are not determined by divine will. The theory is based on the possibility that obligatoriness can be a theological property even if its grounds are such that the content of our obligations has a priori limits. As developed in the paper, the proposed divine command (...) is compatible with the centrality of God in practical ethics; it provides an account of a divine command morality as a set of internalized moral standards; and it is consistent with the autonomy of ethics conceived as a domain in which knowledge is possible independently of reliance on theology or religion. (shrink)
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  50.  85
    Another Step in Divine Command Dialectics.Alexander R. Pruss - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (4):432-439.
    Consider the following three-step dialectics. (1) Even if God (consistently) commanded torture of the innocent, it would still be wrong. Therefore Divine Command Metaethics (DCM) is false. (2) No: for it is impossible for God to command torture of the innocent. (3) Even if it is impossible, there is a non-trivially true per impossibile counterfactual that even if God (consistently) com­manded torture of the innocent, it would still be wrong, and this counterfac­tual is incompatible with DCM. I (...)
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