8 found
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  1.  7
    Frailty Triage: Is Rationing Intensive Medical Treatment on the Grounds of Frailty Ethical?Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (11):48-63.
    In early 2020, a number of countries developed and published intensive care triage guidelines for the pandemic. Several of those guidelines, especially in the UK, encouraged the explicit assessment...
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  2.  13
    A Conscious Choice: Is It Ethical to Aim for Unconsciousness at the End of Life?Antony Takla, Julian Savulescu & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):284-291.
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  3.  52
    Antenatal Diagnosis of Trisomy 18, Harm and Parental Choice.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):644-645.
    In this commentary I assess the possible harms to a fetus with trisomy 18 of continued life. I argue that, although there is good reason to avoid subjecting infants to major surgery and prolonged intensive care where there is little chance of benefit, doctors should support and engage honestly with parents who decide to continue their pregnancies. We should ensure that infants with trisomy 18 have access to high quality palliative care.
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  4.  34
    Zika, Contraception and the Non‐Identity Problem.Keyur Doolabh, Lucius Caviola, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):173-204.
    The 2016 outbreak of the Zika arbovirus was associated with large numbers of cases of the newly-recognised Congenital Zika Syndrome. This novel teratogenic epidemic raises significant ethical and practical issues. Many of these arise from strategies used to avoid cases of CZS, with contraception in particular being one proposed strategy that is atypical in epidemic control. Using contraception to reduce the burden of CZS has an ethical complication: interventions that impact the timing of conception alter which people will exist in (...)
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  5. Dementia, Frailty and Triage in a Pandemic.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (12):1-4.
    I am grateful to the commentators for their deep engagement with the issues raised in my paper. They raise a number of important challenges and questions about the use of frailty i...
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  6.  3
    Ethical Factors Determining ECMO Allocation During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson, John F. Fraser, Jacky Y. Suen, Julian Savulescu & Bernadine Dao - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundECMO is a particularly scarce resource during the COVID-19 pandemic. Its allocation involves ethical considerations that may be different to usual times. There is limited pre-pandemic literature on the ethical factors that ECMO physicians consider during ECMO allocation. During the pandemic, there has been relatively little professional guidance specifically relating to ethics and ECMO allocation; although there has been active ethical debate about allocation of other critical care resources. We report the results of a small international exploratory survey of ECMO (...)
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  7.  78
    Selling Organs and Souls: Should the State Prohibit 'Demeaning' Practices? [REVIEW]Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):27-31.
    It is sometimes argued that practices such as organ-selling should be prohibited because they are demeaning to the individuals involved. In this article the plausibility of such an argument is questioned. I will examine what it means to demean or be demeaned, and suggest that the mere fact that an individual is demeaning themself does not provide sufficient justification for legal prohibition. On the contrary, such laws might be argued to be demeaning.
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  8.  17
    The “Research Misconception” and the SUPPORT Trial: Toward Evidence-Based Consensus.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson, Nicole Gerrand, Melinda Cruz & William Tarnow-Mordi - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):48-50.
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