Results for 'Dominic James Wilkinson'

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  1.  62
    A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
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  2.  14
    Shedding Light on the Gray Zone.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):W3 - W5.
  3.  12
    Is Withdrawing Treatment Really More Problematic Than Withholding Treatment?James Cameron, Julian Savulescu & Dominic Wilkinson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106330.
    There is a concern that as a result of COVID-19 there will be a shortage of ventilators for patients requiring respiratory support. This concern has resulted in significant debate about whether it is appropriate to withdraw ventilation from one patient in order to provide it to another patient who may benefit more. The current advice available to doctors appears to be inconsistent, with some suggesting withdrawal of treatment is more serious than withholding, while others suggest that this distinction should not (...)
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  4.  16
    The Structure of Aristotelian Logic.James Wilkinson Miller - 1938 - London: K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co..
    Originally published in 1938. This compact treatise is a complete treatment of Aristotle’s logic as containing negative terms. It begins with defining Aristotelian logic as a subject-predicate logic confining itself to the four forms of categorical proposition known as the A, E, I and O forms. It assigns conventional meanings to these categorical forms such that subalternation holds. It continues to discuss the development of the logic since the time of its founder and address traditional logic as it existed in (...)
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  5.  6
    Valuing life and evaluating suffering in infants with life-limiting illness.Dominic Wilkinson & Amir Zayegh - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):179-196.
    In this paper, we explore three separate questions that are relevant to assessing the prudential value of life in infants with severe life-limiting illness. First, what is the value or disvalue of a short life? Is it in the interests of a child to save her life if she will nevertheless die in infancy or very early childhood? Second, how does profound cognitive impairment affect the balance of positives and negatives in a child’s future life? Third, if the life of (...)
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  6.  2
    Evolution and the Founders of Pragmatism.James Wilkinson Miller - 1950 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 11 (2):276-277.
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  7.  71
    Negative Terms in Traditional Logic: Distribution, Immediate Inference and Syllogism.James Wilkinson Miller - 1932 - The Monist 42 (1):96-111.
  8.  3
    Leonard Henry S.. Principles of Right Reason. Henry Holt and Company, New York 1957, Xx + 620 Pp. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1958 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (4):435-436.
  9.  4
    Review: Henry S. Leonard, Principles of Right Reason. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1958 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (4):435-436.
  10. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
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  11. A Costly Separation Between Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (3):127-137.
    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively (...)
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  12.  52
    Hard Lessons: Learning From the Charlie Gard Case.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):438-442.
    On 24 July 2017, the long-running, deeply tragic and emotionally fraught case of Charlie Gard reached its sad conclusion. Following further medical assessment of the infant, Charlie’s parents and doctors finally reached agreement that continuing medical treatment was not in Charlie’s best interests. Life support was subsequently withdrawn and Charlie died on 28 July 2017.Box 1 ### Case summary and timeline21–23 Charlie Gard was born at full term, apparently healthy, in August 2016. At a few weeks of age his parents (...)
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  13.  25
    ICU Triage in an Impending Crisis: Uncertainty, Pre-Emption and Preparation.Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):287-288.
    The COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic raises a host of challenging ethical questions at every level of society. However, some of the most acute questions relate to decision making in intensive care. The problem is that a small but significant proportion of patients develop severe viral pneumonitis and respiratory failure. It now seems likely that the number of critically ill patients will overwhelm the capacity of intensive care units within many health systems, including the National Health Service in the UK. The experience (...)
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  14.  34
    Harm Isn't All You Need: Parental Discretion and Medical Decisions for a Child: Table 1.Dominic Wilkinson & Tara Nair - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):116-118.
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  15.  60
    In Favour of Medical Dissensus: Why We Should Agree to Disagree About End‐of‐Life Decisions.Dominic Wilkinson, Robert Truog & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (2):109-118.
    End-of-life decision-making is controversial. There are different views about when it is appropriate to limit life-sustaining treatment, and about what palliative options are permissible. One approach to decisions of this nature sees consensus as crucial. Decisions to limit treatment are made only if all or a majority of caregivers agree. We argue, however, that it is a mistake to require professional consensus in end-of-life decisions. In the first part of the article we explore practical, ethical, and legal factors that support (...)
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  16.  7
    Miller James Wilkinson. Exercises in Introductory Symbolic Logic. Lithoprinted From Typewritten Manuscript. Published by the Author, McGill University, Montreal; Wholesale From Edwards Brothers, Ann Arbor, Michigan; 1955, Ix + 59 Pp. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (3):310-311.
  17.  2
    Miller James Wilkinson. Logic Workbook. Oxford University Press, New York 1958, Vii + 88 Pp. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1958 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (2):213-213.
  18.  6
    Review: James Wilkinson Miller, Logic Workbook. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1958 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (2):213-213.
  19.  15
    Review: James Wilkinson Miller, Exercises in Introductory Symbolic Logic. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (3):310-311.
  20.  23
    The Logic of the Synthetic a Priori.James Wilkinson Miller - 1975 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 16 (4):465-475.
  21.  28
    Miller James Wilkinson. The Structure of Aristotelian Logic. Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., London 1938, 97 Pp. [REVIEW]C. H. Langford - 1939 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 4 (3):121-122.
  22.  9
    Descartes's Conceptualism.James Wilkinson Miller - 1950 - Review of Metaphysics 4 (2):239 - 246.
    In this paper I shall try to do three things: first, to present Descartes's theory of universals; second, to argue that it creates insoluble difficulties for his system; and third, to explain why Descartes, who was not unaware of these difficulties, nevertheless persisted in holding it.
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  23.  5
    Faris J. A.. The Gergonne Relations.James Wilkinson Miller - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (1):94-94.
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  24.  19
    Logical Dualism.James Wilkinson Miller - 1950 - Journal of Philosophy 47 (12):341-353.
  25.  12
    Review: Ivo Thomas, Eulerian Syllogistic. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (4):381-382.
  26.  2
    Review: J. A. Faris, The Gergonne Relations. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (1):94-95.
  27.  15
    Review: W. H. Werkmeister, An Introduction to Critical Thinking. A Beginner's Text in Logic. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1963 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (4):294-295.
  28.  5
    Thomas Ivo. Eulerian Syllogistic.James Wilkinson Miller - 1957 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (4):381-382.
  29.  6
    The Logic of Terms.James Wilkinson Miller, Paul Henle, Horace M. Kallen & Susanne K. Langer - 1951 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):287-288.
  30. The Structure of Aristotelian Logic.James Wilkinson Miller - 1938 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1938. This compact treatise is a complete treatment of Aristotle’s logic as containing negative terms. It begins with defining Aristotelian logic as a subject-predicate logic confining itself to the four forms of categorical proposition known as the _A, E, I _and_ O_ forms. It assigns conventional meanings to these categorical forms such that subalternation holds. It continues to discuss the development of the logic since the time of its founder and address traditional logic as it existed in (...)
     
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  31. The Structure of Aristotelian Logic.James Wilkinson Miller - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49:95.
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  32.  12
    Werkmeister W. H.. An Introduction to Critical Thinking. A Beginner's Text in Logic. Revised Edition. Johnsen Publishing Company, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1957, Xx + 663 Pp. [REVIEW]James Wilkinson Miller - 1963 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 28 (4):294-295.
  33.  13
    Miller James Wilkinson. The Logic of Terms. Structure, Method and Meaning, Essays in Honor of Henry M. Sheffer, Edited by Henle Paul, Kallen Horace M., and Langer Susanne K., The Liberal Arts Press, New York 1951, Pp. 35–41. [REVIEW]Ivo Thomas - 1951 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):287-288.
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  34.  16
    Review: James Wilkinson Miller, Paul Henle, Horace M. Kallen, Susanne K. Langer, The Logic of Terms. [REVIEW]Ivo Thomas - 1951 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):287-288.
  35.  41
    Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
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  36.  7
    Sleep Softly: Schubert, Ethics and the Value of Dying Well.Dominic Wilkinson - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (4):218-224.
    Ethical discussions about medical treatment for seriously ill babies or children often focus on the ‘value of life’ or on ‘quality of life’ and what that might mean. In this paper, I look at the other side of the coin—on the value of death, and on the quality of dying. In particular, I examine whether there is such a thing as a good way to die, for an infant or an adult, and what that means for medical care. To do (...)
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  37.  68
    The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):401-410.
    Predictions of poor prognosis for critically ill patients may become self-fulfilling if life-sustaining treatment or resuscitation is subsequently withheld on the basis of that prediction. This paper outlines the epistemic and normative problems raised by self-fulfilling prophecies (SFPs) in intensive care. Where predictions affect outcome, it can be extremely difficult to ascertain the mortality rate for patients if all treatment were provided. SFPs may lead to an increase in mortality for cohorts of patients predicted to have poor prognosis, they may (...)
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  38.  3
    Surrogate Decision Making in Crisis.Dominic Wilkinson & Thillagavathie Pillay - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107181.
    Care of the critically ill newborn includes support for the birth mother/parents with regular updates around the clinical condition of the baby, and involvement in discussions around complex decision-making issues. Discussions around continuation or discontinuation of life-sustaining are challenging even in the most straightforward of cases, but what happens when the birth mother is critically unwell? Such cases can lead to uncertainty around who should assume the parental role for these difficult discussions. In this round table discussion, we explore the (...)
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  39.  55
    Protecting Future Children From In‐Utero Harm.Dominic Wilkinson, Loane Skene, Lachlan de Crespigny & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):425-432.
    The actions of pregnant women can cause harm to their future children. However, even if the possible harm is serious and likely to occur, the law will generally not intervene. A pregnant woman is an autonomous person who is entitled to make her own decisions. A fetus in-utero has no legal right to protection. In striking contrast, the child, if born alive, may sue for injury in-utero; and the child is entitled to be protected by being removed from her parents (...)
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  40.  25
    Conscientious Non-Objection in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):132-142.
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  41.  28
    Cost-Equivalence and Pluralism in Publicly-Funded Health-Care Systems.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (4):287-309.
    Clinical guidelines summarise available evidence on medical treatment, and provide recommendations about the most effective and cost-effective options for patients with a given condition. However, sometimes patients do not desire the best available treatment. Should doctors in a publicly-funded healthcare system ever provide sub-optimal medical treatment? On one view, it would be wrong to do so, since this would violate the ethical principle of beneficence, and predictably lead to harm for patients. It would also, potentially, be a misuse of finite (...)
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  42.  16
    The Relational Threshold: A Life That is Valued, or a Life of Value?Dominic Wilkinson, Claudia Brick, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):24-25.
    The four thoughtful commentaries on our feature article draw out interesting empirical and normative questions. The aim of our study was to examine the views of a sample of the general public about a set of cases of disputed treatment for severely impaired infants.1 We compared those views with legal determinations that treatment was or was not in the infants’ best interests, and with some published ethical frameworks for decisions. We deliberately did not draw explicit ethical conclusions from our survey (...)
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  43.  79
    Utilitarianism and the Pandemic.Julian Savulescu, Ingmar Persson & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (6):620-632.
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  44.  17
    Withdrawal Aversion and the Equivalence Test.Julian Savulescu, Ella Butcherine & Dominic Wilkinson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (3):21-28.
    If a doctor is trying to decide whether or not to provide a medical treatment, does it matter ethically whether that treatment has already been started? Health professionals sometimes find it harder to stop a treatment than to refrain from starting the treatment. But does that feeling correspond to an ethical difference? In this article, we defend equivalence—the view that withholding and withdrawal of treatment are ethically equivalent when all other factors are equal. We argue that preference for withholding over (...)
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  45.  45
    How Much Weight Should We Give to Parental Interests in Decisions About Life Support for Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2010 - Monash Bioethics Review 29 (2):13-1.
    Life-sustaining treatment is sometimes withdrawn or withheld from critically ill newborn infants with poor prognosis. Guidelines relating to such decisions place emphasis on the best interests of the infant. However, in practice, parental views and parental interests are often taken into consideration.In this paper I draw on the example of newborn infants with severe muscle weakness. I provide two arguments that parental interests should be given some weight in decisions about treatment, and that they should be given somewhat more weight (...)
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  46.  69
    Is It Better to Be Minimally Conscious Than Vegetative?Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):557-558.
    In the case of Re M, summarised in the paper by Julian Sheather, Justice Baker faced the difficult task of weighing up objectively whether or not it was in Mâs best interests to withdraw artificial feeding and to let her die.1 The judge concluded that M was ârecognisably aliveâ, and that the advantages of continued life outweighed the disadvantages. He compared her minimally conscious state favourably to that of a persistent vegetative state .2 It was clear that artificial feeding would (...)
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  47.  44
    The Window of Opportunity: Decision Theory and the Timing of Prognostic Tests for Newborn Infants.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):503-514.
    In many forms of severe acute brain injury there is an early phase when prognosis is uncertain, followed later by physiological recovery and the possibility of more certain predictions of future impairment. There may be a window of opportunity for withdrawal of life support early, but if decisions are delayed there is the risk that the patient will survive with severe impairment. In this paper I focus on the example of neonatal encephalopathy and the question of the timing of prognostic (...)
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  48. Consequentialism and the Death Penalty.Dominic J. Wilkinson & Thomas Douglas - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):56-58.
    Comment on "The ethical 'elephant' in the death penalty 'room'". Arguments in defense of the death penalty typically fall into one of two groups. Consequentialist arguments point out beneficial aspects of capital punishment, normally focusing on deterrence, while non-consequentialist arguments seek to justify execution independently of its effects, for example, by appealing to the concept of retribution. Michael Keane's target article "The ethical 'elephant' in the death penalty 'room'" should, we believe, be read as an interesting new consequentialist defense of (...)
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  49.  21
    Rationing Conscience.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):226-229.
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  50.  7
    Current Controversies and Irresolvable Disagreement: The Case of Vincent Lambert and the Role of ‘Dissensus’.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (10):631-635.
    Controversial cases in medical ethics are, by their very nature, divisive. There are disagreements that revolve around questions of fact or of value. Ethical debate may help in resolving those disagreements. However, sometimes in such cases, there are opposing reasonable views arising from deep-seated differences in ethical values. It is unclear that agreement and consensus will ever be possible. In this paper, we discuss the recent controversial case of Vincent Lambert, a French man, diagnosed with a vegetative state, for whom (...)
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