41 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Dominic Wilkinson [35]Dominic J. C. Wilkinson [4]Dominic James Wilkinson [2]
  1. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  2.  43
    A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  3.  13
    Harm Isn't All You Need: Parental Discretion and Medical Decisions for a Child: Table 1.Dominic Wilkinson & Tara Nair - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):116-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4. A Costly Separation Between Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (3):127-137.
    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  57
    The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):401-410.
    Predictions of poor prognosis for critically ill patients may become self-fulfilling if life-sustaining treatment or resuscitation is subsequently withheld on the basis of that prediction. This paper outlines the epistemic and normative problems raised by self-fulfilling prophecies (SFPs) in intensive care. Where predictions affect outcome, it can be extremely difficult to ascertain the mortality rate for patients if all treatment were provided. SFPs may lead to an increase in mortality for cohorts of patients predicted to have poor prognosis, they may (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6.  26
    What has Philosophy Got to Do It? Conflicting Views and Values in End-of-Life Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (9):591-592.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  19
    Conscientious Non-Objection in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):132-142.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  26
    Hard Lessons: Learning From the Charlie Gard Case.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104492.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  13
    Paternalism on Mars.Dominic Wilkinson - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (5):271-272.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  48
    In Favour of Medical Dissensus: Why We Should Agree to Disagree About End‐of‐Life Decisions.Dominic Wilkinson, Robert Truog & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (2):109-118.
    End-of-life decision-making is controversial. There are different views about when it is appropriate to limit life-sustaining treatment, and about what palliative options are permissible. One approach to decisions of this nature sees consensus as crucial. Decisions to limit treatment are made only if all or a majority of caregivers agree. We argue, however, that it is a mistake to require professional consensus in end-of-life decisions. In the first part of the article we explore practical, ethical, and legal factors that support (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11.  62
    Consequentialism and the Death Penalty.Dominic Wilkinson & Thomas Douglas - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):56-58.
  12.  24
    Schrodinger's Fetus.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (1):1-1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  49
    Antenatal Diagnosis of Trisomy 18, Harm and Parental Choice.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):644-645.
    In this commentary I assess the possible harms to a fetus with trisomy 18 of continued life. I argue that, although there is good reason to avoid subjecting infants to major surgery and prolonged intensive care where there is little chance of benefit, doctors should support and engage honestly with parents who decide to continue their pregnancies. We should ensure that infants with trisomy 18 have access to high quality palliative care.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14.  24
    Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  23
    Disability, Discrimination and Death : Is It Justified to Ration Life Saving Treatment for Disabled Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    Disability might be relevant to decisions about life support in intensive care in several ways. It might affect the chance of treatment being successful, or a patient’s life expectancy with treatment. It may affect whether treatment is in a patient’s best interests. However, even if treatment would be of overall benefit it may be unaffordable and consequently unable to be provided. In this paper we will draw on the example of neonatal intensive care, and ask whether or when it is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  19
    Making the Cut: Analytical and Empirical Bioethics.Dominic Wilkinson - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):581-582.
    This issue of the journal includes papers across both analytical and empirical schools within bioethics.In his feature article, ‘The kindest cut? Surgical castration, sex offenders and coercive offers’, John McMillan asks whether surgical castration can be ethically provided as medical treatment for sex offenders . While surgical castration has previously been available in a number of European countries, in recent years it has only been available in the Czech Republic and in Germany. The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  11
    Settling for Second Best: When Should Doctors Agree to Parental Demands for Suboptimal Medical Treatment?Tara Nair, Julian Savulescu, Jim Everett, Ryan Tonkens & Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (12):831-840.
    Background Doctors sometimes encounter parents who object to prescribed treatment for their children, and request suboptimal substitutes be administered instead. Previous studies have focused on parental refusal of treatment and when this should be permitted, but the ethics of requests for suboptimal treatment has not been explored. Methods The paper consists of two parts: an empirical analysis and an ethical analysis. We performed an online survey with a sample of the general public to assess respondents’ thresholds for acceptable harm and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  35
    The Window of Opportunity: Decision Theory and the Timing of Prognostic Tests for Newborn Infants.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):503-514.
    In many forms of severe acute brain injury there is an early phase when prognosis is uncertain, followed later by physiological recovery and the possibility of more certain predictions of future impairment. There may be a window of opportunity for withdrawal of life support early, but if decisions are delayed there is the risk that the patient will survive with severe impairment. In this paper I focus on the example of neonatal encephalopathy and the question of the timing of prognostic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  44
    “Neglected Personhood” and Neglected Questions: Remarks on the Moral Significance of Consciousness.Dominic Wilkinson, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):31 – 33.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21.  69
    Double Trouble: Should Double Embryo Transfer Be Banned?Dominic Wilkinson, G. Owen Schaefer, Kelton Tremellen & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (2):121-139.
    What role should legislation or policy play in avoiding the complications of in-vitro fertilization? In this article, we focus on single versus double embryo transfer, and assess three arguments in favour of mandatory single embryo transfer: risks to the mother, risks to resultant children, and costs to society. We highlight significant ethical concerns about each of these. Reproductive autonomy and non-paternalism are strong enough to outweigh the health concerns for the woman. Complications due to non-identity cast doubt on the extent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  18
    Rationing Conscience.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):226-229.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  21
    How Much Weight Should We Give to Parental Interests in Decisions About Life Support for Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2011 - Monash Bioethics Review 29 (2):13-1.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  41
    Protecting Future Children From In‐Utero Harm.Dominic Wilkinson, Loane Skene, Lachlan de Crespigny & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):425-432.
    The actions of pregnant women can cause harm to their future children. However, even if the possible harm is serious and likely to occur, the law will generally not intervene. A pregnant woman is an autonomous person who is entitled to make her own decisions. A fetus in-utero has no legal right to protection. In striking contrast, the child, if born alive, may sue for injury in-utero; and the child is entitled to be protected by being removed from her parents (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  41
    Challenging the Status Quo.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):235-237.
    Harold Jaffe argues that we should adopt opt-out testing for HIV. There are paternalistic and utilitarian arguments for such an approach. In this commentary I draw attention to some similarities between his arguments and debates about opt-out systems of organ donation. I argue that the status quo bias provides both part of the reason that opt-out approaches work, and an explanation for why such approaches are sometimes resisted.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  15
    Cost-Equivalence and Pluralism in Publicly-Funded Health-Care Systems.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-23.
    Clinical guidelines summarise available evidence on medical treatment, and provide recommendations about the most effective and cost-effective options for patients with a given condition. However, sometimes patients do not desire the best available treatment. Should doctors in a publicly-funded healthcare system ever provide sub-optimal medical treatment? On one view, it would be wrong to do so, since this would violate the ethical principle of beneficence, and predictably lead to harm for patients. It would also, potentially, be a misuse of finite (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  39
    Author Q & A.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):125-126.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  51
    Precision and the Rules of Prioritization.John Mcmillan, Tony Hope & Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (4):336-345.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  9
    How Can You Be Transparent About Labeling the Living as Dead?David Rodríguez-Arias, Dominic Wilkinson & Stuart Youngner - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):24-25.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  56
    Selling Organs and Souls: Should the State Prohibit 'Demeaning' Practices? [REVIEW]Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):27-31.
    It is sometimes argued that practices such as organ-selling should be prohibited because they are demeaning to the individuals involved. In this article the plausibility of such an argument is questioned. I will examine what it means to demean or be demeaned, and suggest that the mere fact that an individual is demeaning themself does not provide sufficient justification for legal prohibition. On the contrary, such laws might be argued to be demeaning.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  9
    Author Q & A.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62:125-126.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  21
    Ethical Language and Decision-Making for Prenatally Diagnosed Lethal Malformations.Dominic Wilkinson, Lachlan De Crespigny & Vicki Xafis - unknown
    In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  25
    Balancing Obligations: Should Written Information About Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Neutral?Vicki Xafis, Dominic Wilkinson, Lynn Gillam & Jane Sullivan - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):234-239.
    Parents who are facing decisions about life-sustaining treatment for their seriously ill or dying child are supported by their child's doctors and nurses. They also frequently seek other information sources to help them deal with the medical and ethical questions that arise. This might include written or web-based information. As part of a project involving the development of such a resource to support parents facing difficult decisions, some ethical questions emerged. Should this information be presented in a strictly neutral fashion? (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  14
    Ethical Dilemmas in Postnatal Treatment of Severe Congenital Hydrocephalus.Dominic Wilkinson - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):84-92.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  2
    Zika, Contraception and the Non‐Identity Problem.Keyur Doolabh, Lucius Caviola, Julian Savulescu, Michael Selgelid & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):173-204.
    The 2016 outbreak of the Zika arbovirus was associated with large numbers of cases of the newly-recognised Congenital Zika Syndrome. This novel teratogenic epidemic raises significant ethical and practical issues. Many of these arise from strategies used to avoid cases of CZS, with contraception in particular being one proposed strategy that is atypical in epidemic control. Using contraception to reduce the burden of CZS has an ethical complication: interventions that impact the timing of conception alter which people will exist in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  25
    Should We Replace Disabled Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):390-414.
    If a disabled newborn infant dies, her parents may be able to conceive another child without impairment. This is sometimes referred to as 'replacement'. Some philosophers have argued that replacement provides a strong reason for disabled newborns to be killed or allowed to die. In this paper I focus on the case for replacement as it relates to decisions about life support in newborn intensive care. I argue (following Jeff McMahan) that the impersonal reason to replace is weak and easily (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  7
    Safeguarding Choice at the End of Life.Dominic Wilkinson - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):575-576.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  8
    The “Research Misconception” and the SUPPORT Trial: Toward Evidence-Based Consensus.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson, Nicole Gerrand, Melinda Cruz & William Tarnow-Mordi - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):48-50.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  7
    Enhancing Debate About the Sexes.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (12):721-721.
    Dr Dominic Wilkinson, Department of Neonatal Medicine, University of Adelaide, 72 King William Rd, North Adelaide, South Australia 5006, Australia; dominic.wilkinson@adelaide.edu.au, domjcw@gmail.comIs it good for there to be both males and females of our species? This question seems highly fanciful, and a long way from the ethical questions that health professionals face on a daily basis. However, philosophical thought experiments like this sometimes help to clarify questions that are of much broader relevance. In this case, the prospect of an all-female (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  13
    Shedding Light on the Gray Zone.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):W3 - W5.
  41.  11
    Trade-Offs in Suffering and Wellbeing: The Utilitarian Argument for Primate Stroke Research.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):19-21.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography