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Don Garrett [86]Don James Garrett [1]
  1. Cognition and commitment in Hume's philosophy.Don Garrett - 1997 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    It is widely believed that Hume often wrote carelessly and contradicted himself, and that no unified, sound philosophy emerges from his writings. Don Garrett demonstrates that such criticisms of Hume are without basis. Offering fresh and trenchant solutions to longstanding problems in Hume studies, Garrett's penetrating analysis also makes clear the continuing relevance of Hume's philosophy.
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  2.  40
    Hume.Don Garrett - 2015 - New York: Routledge.
    Beginning with an overview of Hume's life and work, Don Garrett introduces in clear and accessible style the central aspects of Hume's thought. These include Hume's lifelong exploration of the human mind; his theories of inductive inference and causation; skepticism and personal identity; moral and political philosophy; aesthetics; and philosophy of religion. The final chapter considers the influence and legacy of Hume's thought today. Throughout, Garrett draws on and explains many of Hume's central works, including his Treatise of Human Nature (...)
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  3. Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy.Don Garrett - 1997 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):191-196.
  4.  35
    Spinoza.Don Garrett - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):952-955.
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  5.  24
    Necessity and Nature in Spinoza's Philosophy.Don Garrett - 2018 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  6. Spinoza's Conatus Argument.Don Garrett - 2002 - In Olli Koistinen & J. I. Biro (eds.), Spinoza: Metaphysical Themes. Oxford University Press. pp. 127-58.
     
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  7.  23
    The Cambridge companion to Spinoza.Don Garrett (ed.) - 1996 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Benedict (Baruch) de Spinoza (1632–1677) was one of the most systematic, inspiring, and influential philosophers of the early modern period. From a pantheistic starting point that identified God with Nature as all of reality, he sought to demonstrate an ethics of reason, virtue, and freedom while unifying religion with science and mind with body. His contributions to metaphysics, epistemology, psychology, ethics, politics, and the analysis of religion remain vital to the present day. Yet his writings initially appear forbidding to contemporary (...)
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  8.  29
    Spinoza.Don Garrett & R. J. Delahunty - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (4):610.
  9. Hume’s naturalistic theory of representation.Don Garrett - 2006 - Synthese 152 (3):301-319.
    Hume is a naturalist in many different respects and about many different topics; this paper argues that he is also a naturalist about intentionality and representation. It does so in the course of answering four questions about his theory of mental representation: (1) Which perceptions represent? (2) What can perceptions represent? (3) Why do perceptions represent at all? (4) Howdo perceptions represent what they do? It appears that, for Hume, all perceptions except passions can represent; and they can represent bodies, (...)
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  10.  31
    The Sceptical Realism of David Hume.Don Garrett & John P. Wright - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (1):131.
  11. Representation and consciousness in Spinoza's naturalistic theory of the imagination.Don Garrett - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press. pp. 4--25.
  12. Spinoza on the Essence of the Human Body and the Part of the Mind that is Eternal.Don Garrett - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  13. Reasons to act and believe: naturalism and rational justification in Hume’s philosophical project.Don Garrett - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 132 (1):1-16.
    Is Hume a naturalist? Does he regard all or nearly all beliefs and actions as rationally unjustified? In order to settle these questions, it is necessary to examine their key terms and to understand the character-especially the normative character-of Hume's philosophical project. This paper argues that Hume is a naturalist-and, in particular, both a moral and an epistemic naturalist-in quite robust ways; and that Hume can properly regard many actions and beliefs as "rationally justified" in several different senses of that (...)
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  14. What's True about Hume's 'True Religion'?Don Garrett - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):199-220.
    Despite his well-known criticisms of popular religion, Hume refers in seemingly complimentary terms to ‘true religion’; in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, his character Philo goes so far as to express ‘veneration for’ it. This paper addresses three questions. First, did Hume himself really approve of something that he called ‘true religion’? Second, what did he mean by calling it ‘true’? Third, what did he take it to be? By appeal to some of his key doctrines about causation and probability, and (...)
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  15.  31
    Hume's Conclusions in “Conclusion of this Book”.Don Garrett - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 151–175.
    This chapter contains section titled: Some Features of Hume's Approach to the Science of Man Structure and Content of “Conclusion of this book” The Rational Justification of Belief Skepticism and Naturalism Notes References Further reading.
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  16.  88
    Hume's Geography of Feeling in A Treatise of Human Nature.Don Garrett - forthcoming - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Hume describes “mental geography” as the endeavor to know “the different operations of the mind, to separate them from each other, to class them under their proper heads, and to correct all that seeming disorder, in which they lie involved, when made the object of reflection and enquiry.” While much has been written about his geography of thought in Treatise Book 1, relatively little has been written about his geography of feeling in Books 2 and 3, with the result that (...)
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  17. Spinoza's "ontological" argument.Don Garrett - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (2):198-223.
    I argue that spinoza's ontological argument is successful when it is understood to have two premises: (i) it is possible for god to exist, (ii) it is necessary that, if god exists, he necessarily does. the argument is valid in s5. spinoza is in a position to establish the second premise of the argument on the basis of his definitions and axioms. the first premise was assumed to be true, but, as leibniz noted, it must be established for the conclusion (...)
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  18. The First Motive to Justice: Hume's Circle Argument Squared.Don Garrett - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (2):257-288.
    Hume argues that respect for property (“justice”) is a convention-dependent (“artificial”) virtue. He does so by appeal to a principle, derived from his virtue-based approach to ethics, which requires that, for any kind of virtuous action, there be a “first virtuous motive” that is other than a sense of moral duty. It has been objected, however, that in the case of justice (and also in a parallel argument concerning promise-keeping) Hume (i) does not, (ii) should not, and (iii) cannot recognize (...)
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  19. Hume's self-doubts about personal identity.Don Garrett - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):337-358.
    In this appendix to "a treatise of human nature", Hume expresses dissatisfaction with his own account of personal identity, Claiming that it is "inconsistent." in spite of much recent discussion of the appendix, There has been little agreement either about the reasons for hume's second thoughts or about the philosophical moral to be drawn from them. The present article argues, First, That none of the explanations for his misgivings which have been offered has succeeded in describing a problem which would (...)
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  20. 'A Small Tincture of Pyrrhonism': Skepticism and Naturalism in Hume's Science of Man.Don Garrett - 2004 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Pyrrhonian Skepticism. Oxford University Press. pp. 68--98.
     
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  21.  66
    Ideas, Reason, and Skepticism: Replies to my Critics.Don Garrett - 1998 - Hume Studies 24 (1):171-194.
  22. Hume on Testimony Concerning Miracles.Don Garrett - 2001 - In Peter Millican (ed.), Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry. New York: Oxford University Press.
  23. Monism, Spinoza’s Way.Don Garrett - 2021 - The Monist 104 (1):38-59.
    Monism, characterized by Jonathan Schaffer as the thesis that the cosmos is the one and only basic actual concrete object, has been the subject of a great deal of recent interest. Spinoza is often taken, rightly, to be an important forebear. This article seeks to explain the distinctive content and basis of Spinoza’s monistic metaphysics and to compare it to contemporary Monism. It then argues that although Spinoza’s monistic metaphysics is not strictly a version of Monism as defined, it has (...)
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  24.  35
    Nature and necessity in Spinoza's philosophy.Don Garrett - 2018 - New York City: Oxford University Press.
    Spinoza's guiding commitment to the thesis that nothing exists or occurs outside of the scope of nature and its necessary laws makes him one of the great seventeenth-century exemplars of both philosophical naturalism and explanatory rationalism. Nature and Necessity in Spinoza's Philosophy brings together for the first time eighteen of Don Garrett's articles on Spinoza's philosophy, ranging over the fields of metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, ethics, and political philosophy. Taken together, these influential articles provide a comprehensive interpretation of that (...)
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  25.  9
    Liberty and Suspension in Locke's Theory of the Will.Don Garrett - 2015 - In Matthew Stuart (ed.), A Companion to Locke. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley. pp. 260–278.
    The nature and consistency of John Locke's views about liberty and suspension, as well as their bearing on what is now called determinism, remain matters of controversy and sometimes, despair. This chapter explains what it is that "determines the will" according to John Locke. It begins by explaining the central terms Locke employs and the meanings he assigns them. Next, the chapter cites and discusses some of the main doctrines that he formulates using that terminology. In light of these explanations, (...)
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  26. Locke on Personal Identity, Consciousness, and “Fatal Errors”.Don Garrett - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1-2):95-125.
  27.  12
    The Cambridge companion to Nietzsche.Don Garrett, Bernd Magnus, Kathleen Marie Higgins & Kathleen Higgins (eds.) - 1996 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    The significance of Friedrich Nietzsche for twentieth century culture is now no longer a matter of dispute. He was quite simply one of the most influential of modern thinkers. The opening essay of this 1996 Companion provides a chronologically organised introduction to and summary of Nietzsche's published works, while also providing an overview of their basic themes and concerns. It is followed by three essays on the appropriation and misappropriation of his writings, and a group of essays exploring the nature (...)
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  28.  36
    Representation and the Mind-Body Problem in Spinoza.Don Garrett - 1996 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):223-226.
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  29. Truth, method, and correspondence in Spinoza and Leibniz.Don Garrett - 1990 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 6:13.
  30.  32
    The Empiricists: Critical Essays on Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.M. R. Ayers, Phillip D. Cummins, Robert Fogelin, Don Garrett, Edwin McCann, Charles J. McCracken, George Pappas, G. A. J. Rogers, Barry Stroud, Ian Tipton, Margaret D. Wilson & Kenneth Winkler - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection of essays on themes in the work of John Locke , George Berkeley , and David Hume , provides a deepened understanding of major issues raised in the Empiricist tradition. In exploring their shared belief in the experiential nature of mental constructs, The Empiricists illuminates the different methodologies of these great Enlightenment philosophers and introduces students to important metaphysical and epistemological issues including the theory of ideas, personal identity, and skepticism. It will be especially useful in courses devoted (...)
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  31.  31
    Philosophy and History in the History of Modern Philosophy.Don Garrett - 2004 - In Brian Leiter (ed.), The Future for Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 44--73.
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  32. Pyrrhonian skepticism and humean skepticism : belief, evidence, and causal power.Don Garrett - 2020 - In Justin Vlasits & Katja Maria Vogt (eds.), Epistemology after Sextus Empiricus. Oxford University Press.
     
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  33. Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise.Don Garrett - 2001 - Mind 110 (438):460-464.
  34.  35
    Hume’s Imagination by Tito MAGRI (review).Don Garrett - 2023 - Review of Metaphysics 77 (1):156-158.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Reviewed by: Hume’s Imagination by Tito MAGRI Don Garrett MAGRI, Tito. Hume’s Imagination. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022. xiii + 494 pp. Cloth, $115.00In A Treatise of Human Nature, Hume defines “the imagination” in an inclusive sense as “the faculty, by which we form our fainter ideas”—that is, those that are not memories. In the narrower sense, it is “the same faculty, excluding only our demonstrative and probable (...)
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  35. Hume's system of the sciences.Don Garrett - 2019 - In Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), _The Humean Mind_. New York: Routledge.
  36.  32
    Loeb’s “Standard” Questions about Hume’s Concept of Probable Truth.Don Garrett - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (2):279-300.
    It is an honor to receive such extensive comments from Louis Loeb, whose work I admire and from whom I have learned much. In particular, his landmark 2002 book, Stability and Justification in Hume’s “Treatise” and his 2010 collection of essays, Reflection and the Stability of Belief: Essays on Descartes, Hume, and Reid are essential reading for anyone who wants to understand early modern epistemology. Some of what I have learned from him is reflected in the book on which he (...)
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  37. The representation of causation and Hume's two definitions of `cause'.Don Garrett - 1993 - Noûs 27 (2):167-190.
  38.  17
    What, in the World, Was Hume Thinking? Comments on Rocknak's Imagined Causes.Don Garrett - 2019 - Hume Studies 45 (1):59-68.
    Stefanie Rocknak's stimulating, challenging, and highly original new book, Imagined Causes: Hume's Conception of Objects, is helpfully summarized on its back cover as follows: This book provides the first comprehensive account of Hume's conception of objects in Book I of A Treatise of Human Nature. What, according to Hume, are objects? Ideas? Impressions? Mind-independent objects? All three? None of the above? Through a close textual analysis, Rocknak shows that Hume thought that objects are imagined ideas. But, she argues, he struggled (...)
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  39.  43
    Owen on Humean Reason.Don Garrett - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (2):291-303.
    This article is a critical discussion of David Owen's book, _Hume's Reason. Owen rightly emphasizes (i) that an understanding of Hume's theory of reasoning is essential to understanding his philosophy and (ii) that an understanding of early modern antiformalism in logic is crucial to understanding Hume's theory of reasoning. Against most commentators, Owen and I agree that Hume's famous conclusion about inductive inferences, i.e., that they are "not determin'd by reason"--is a causal rather a normative claim; however, I dispute Owen's (...)
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  40.  16
    Spinoza on Nature.Don Garrett & James Collins - 1986 - Philosophical Review 95 (2):295.
  41.  9
    Hume's Theory of Ideas.Don Garrett - 2008 - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), A Companion to Hume. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 39–57.
    This chapter contains section titled: Basic Distinctions Basic Principles References Further Reading.
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  42.  11
    Encyclopedia of empiricism.Don Garrett & Edward Barbanell (eds.) - 1997 - Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press.
    Featuring more than 150 articles by more than 70 leading scholars, this is the first encyclopedia devoted to empiricism. The _Encyclopedia of Empiricism_ serves four main purposes. First, it provides a convenient source for scholars and students seeking information on particular figures, topics, or doctrines, specifically in their relation to empiricism as an historical movement or to empiricism as a broader tendency of thought. Because each entry contains a brief bibliography of primary and secondary sources, it can usefully serve as (...)
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  43. Once More into the Labyrinth.Don Garrett - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):77-87.
    P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy is an excellent book, consisting—like Hume's Treatise itself—of three excellent parts. I will comment on one central aspect of its second part: its explanation of the source of the second thoughts that Hume famously expressed, with a frustrating lack of specificity, about his own initial discussion of personal identity in the Treatise.As is well known, Hume holds in the section "Of personal identity" (T 1.4.6) that a self, mind, or person (...)
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  44.  35
    Millican’s “Abstract,” “Imaginative,” “Reasonable,” and “Sensible” Questions about Hume’s Theory of Cognition.Don Garrett - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (2):227-242.
    In a 1998 Hume Studies book symposium, Peter Millican provided excellent critical comments on my Cognition and Commitment in Hume’s Philosophy, and I am grateful that he has done the same for Hume. Many of the new or revised interpretations in the latter book result, directly or indirectly, from his extraordinary stimulus, both in his writings and in person, as a philosophical scholar and interlocutor. His comments range over much of the book, but the majority of them concern chapter 2, (...)
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  45.  43
    Priority and Separability in Hume’s Empiricism.Don Garrett - 1985 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 67 (3):270-288.
  46. Teleology in Spinoza and Early Modern Rationalism.Don Garrett - 1999 - In Rocco J. Gennaro & Charles Huenemann (eds.), New essays on the rationalists. New York: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter seeks to establish that Spinoza accepts the legitimacy of many teleological explanations; that in two important respects, Leibniz's view of teleology is not more, and perhaps even less, Aristotleian than Descartes's; and that among Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, it is Spinoza who holds the view of teleology closest to that of Aristotle. The arguments for derive from examinations of Spinoza's doctrine of conatus, critical analysis of Jonathan Bennett's proposed grounds for interpreting Spinoza as denying all teleology, and the (...)
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  47. A Very Brief Summary of Hume’s Morality.Don Garrett - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):253-256.
    Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication 1 is a most useful and agreeable book. It contains a wealth of analysis, argument, and insight about many of the most central elements of the moral theory of one of the greatest moral philosophers in human history: David Hume. The book is well-conceived, well-argued, stimulating, informative, clear, precise, thorough, balanced, nuanced, and ingenious, while evincing—especially in its concluding chapter, when considering possible extensions of Hume's theory—a certain subtle but pleasing "warmth in the cause of (...)
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  48.  12
    Spinoza's Monistic Metaphysics of Substance and Mode.Don Garrett - 2021 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), A Companion to Spinoza. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 93–107.
    Commentators have offered interpretations over many years of the nature and status of the attributes in Spinoza's metaphysics, but attributes are best understood as diverse manners of existence, so that a substance having more than one attribute exists in more than one manner. Spinoza's monistic metaphysics of substance and mode allows him to offer an appealing conception of the nature of space. Spinoza's monistic metaphysics provides the basis for a positive account of how particular things constitute things at all. All (...)
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  49.  37
    The literary arts in Hume's science of the fancy.Don Garrett - 2003 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 44 (108):161-179.
    Philosophers have long disagreed about whether poetry, drama, and other literary arts are important to philosophy and among those who believe that they are important, explanations of that importance have differed greatly. This paper aims to explain and illustrate some of the reasons why Hume found literature to be an important topic for philosophy and philosophers. Philosophy, he holds, can help to explain general and specific literary phenomena, to ground the science of criticism, and to suggest and justify "principles of (...)
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  50. Benedict de Spinoza, Ethics (1677).Don Garrett - 2003 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 245.
     
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