Results for 'Don P. Schopflocher'

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  1.  33
    Autonomous processing in parallel distributed processing networks.Michael R. W. Dawson & Don P. Schopflocher - 1992 - Philosophical Psychology 5 (2):199-219.
    This paper critically examines the claim that parallel distributed processing (PDP) networks are autonomous learning systems. A PDP model of a simple distributed associative memory is considered. It is shown that the 'generic' PDP architecture cannot implement the computations required by this memory system without the aid of external control. In other words, the model is not autonomous. Two specific problems are highlighted: (i) simultaneous learning and recall are not permitted to occur as would be required of an autonomous system; (...)
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  2. Health Care Decisions.Don P. Reynolds - 1999 - Bioethics Forum 15:2.
     
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  3.  10
    Horace, Epistles 2.2.89.Edward H. Bispham & Don P. Fowler - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):280-.
    At Epistles 2.2.87–9 Horace introduces an argument against writing poetry based on the unpleasant mutual admiration required in poetic society with an anecdote about an orator and a jurisconsult: †frater erat Romae† consulti rhetor, ut alter alterius sermone meros audiret honores, Gracchus ut hic illi, foret huic ut Mucius ille.
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  4.  16
    Horace, Epistles 2.2.89.Edward H. Bispham & Don P. Fowler - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1):280-283.
    At Epistles 2.2.87–9 Horace introduces an argument against writing poetry based on the unpleasant mutual admiration required in poetic society with an anecdote about an orator and a jurisconsult: †frater erat Romae† consulti rhetor, ut alter alterius sermone meros audiret honores, Gracchus ut hic illi, foret huic ut Mucius ille.
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  5. Numerically Aided Methods in Phenomenology: A Demonstration.Don Kuiken, Don Schopflocher & T. Wild - 1989 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (4):373-392.
    Phenomenological psychology has emphasized that experience as it is immediately "given" to the experiencing individual is an appropriate subject matter for psychological investigation. Consideration of the methodological implications of this stance suggests that certain text analytic and cluster analytic methods could be used to discern the identifying properties of different types of experience. We present results of a study in which textual analysis was used to identify recurrent properties of participants' verbal accounts of their experience, cluster analysis was used to (...)
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  6. Protecting rainforest realism: James Ladyman, Don Ross: Everything must go: metaphysics naturalized, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007, pp. 368 £49.00 HB.P. Kyle Stanford, Paul Humphreys, Katherine Hawley, James Ladyman & Don Ross - 2010 - Metascience 19 (2):161-185.
    Reply in Book Symposium on James Ladyman, Don Ross: 'Everything must go: metaphysics naturalized', Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007.
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  7.  31
    The Sceptical Realism of David Hume.Don Garrett & John P. Wright - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (1):131.
  8.  35
    Advance Directives: A Computer Assisted Approach to Assuring Patients’ Rights and Compliance with PSDA and JCAHO Standards. [REVIEW]G. Don Murphy, Tom Schenkenberg, Jeff S. Hunter & Margaret P. Battin - 1997 - HEC Forum 9 (3):247-255.
  9. Shaker Village Views.Robert P. Emlen, Don Gifford, Janice Holt Giles, Jerry V. Grant, Douglas R. Allen & John Mcguire - 1990 - Utopian Studies 1 (2):144-150.
  10.  56
    A Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling Approach to Searching and Stopping in Multi-Attribute Judgment.Don van Ravenzwaaij, Chris P. Moore, Michael D. Lee & Ben R. Newell - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (7):1384-1405.
    In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. How do decision makers determine in what sequence to collect information and when to stop? In two experiments, we administered a version of the German cities task developed by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), in which participants had to decide which of two cities had the larger population. Decision makers were not provided with the (...)
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  11. Educationa Studies.Joanne Bronars, Jianping Shen, Don Martin Robert J. Beebe, Edward J. Power Jane Gaskell, Clinton B. Allison C. J. B. MacMillan, George R. Knight Samuel Totten, Robert D. Heslep Joseph S. Malikail, S. Pike Hall Dennis L. Carlson, Demise Twohey Thomas A. Brindley & Francis Schrag Thomas P. Thomas - 1993 - Educational Studies 24 (2):101.
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  12.  35
    310 Name index Cockburn, Claud 68 Collins, S. 208, 210 Comaroff, J. 272.Auguste Comte, J. Daniel, Basil Davidson, Merryl Wyn Davies, W. D. Davies, David De Silva, P. A. Deiros, K. N. O. Dharmadasa, C. G. Diehl & E. Don-Yehiya - 1995 - In Wendy James (ed.), The Pursuit of Certainty: Religious and Cultural Formulations. Routledge.
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  13.  50
    Stability of democracies: a complex systems perspective.Karoline Wiesner, A. Birdi, T. Eliassi-Rad, H. Farrell, D. Garcia, S. Lewandowsky, Patricia Palacios, Don Ross, D. Sornette & Karim P. Y. Thebault - 2019 - European Journal of Physics 40 (1).
    The idea that democracy is under threat, after being largely dormant for at least 40 years, is looming increasingly large in public discourse. Complex systems theory offers a range of powerful new tools to analyse the stability of social institutions in general, and democracy in particular. What makes a democracy stable? And which processes potentially lead to instability of a democratic system? This paper offers a complex systems perspective on this question, informed by areas of the mathematical, natural, and social (...)
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  14.  29
    Advance directives: A computer assisted approach to assuring patients' rights and compliance with PSDA and JCAHO standards. [REVIEW]G. Don Murphy, Tom Schenkenberg, Jeff S. Hunter & Margaret P. Battin - 1997 - HEC Forum 9 (3):247-255.
  15.  32
    In Search of Black Men's MasculinitiesSpeak My Name: Black Men on Masculinity and the American DreamRepresenting Black MenAre We Not Men? Masculine Anxiety and the Problem of African-American Identity. [REVIEW]Marlon B. Ross, Don Belton, Marcellus Blount, George P. Cunningham & Phillip Brian Harper - 1998 - Feminist Studies 24 (3):599.
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  16.  61
    Hume and Wittgenstein: Criteria vs. Skepticism.Don Mannison - 1987 - Hume Studies 13 (2):138-165.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:138 HUME AND WITTGENSTEIN: CRITERIA VS. SKEPTICISM As far as philosophical admonitions go, there are probably few as famous as Wittgenstein's Blue Book warning: We are up against one of the great sources of philosophical bewilderment : we try to find a substance for a substantive, (p. 1) Wittgenstein, of course, could have added: This is something we should have learned long ago from Hume. He could have quoted (...)
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  17.  28
    What science can do for democracy – A complexity science approach.T. Eliassi-rad, H. Farrell, Stephan da GarciaLewandowsky, Patricia Palacios, Don A. Ross, Didier Sornette, Karim P. Y. Thebault & Karoline Wiesner - 2020 - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications 7.
    Political scientists have conventionally assumed that achieving democracy is a one-way ratchet. Only very recently has the question of ‘democratic backsliding’ attracted any research attention. We argue that democratic instability is best understood with tools from complexity science. The explanatory power of complexity science arises from several features of complex systems. Their relevance in the context of democracy is discussed. Several policy recommen- dations are offered to help stabilize current systems of representative democracy.
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  18.  47
    Patrons—Philip Hefner Fund.Solomon H. Katz, William Lesher, Karl E. Peters, Don Browning, Paul H. Carr, Marjorie H. Davis, Thomas L. Gilbert, P. Roger Gillette, Melvin Gray & Lothar Schäfer - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):653-654.
  19. A self-help guide for autonomous systems.Author unknown - manuscript
    Abstract: When things go badly, we notice that something is amiss, figure out what went wrong and why, and attempt to repair the problem. Artificial systems depend on their human designers to program in responses to every eventuality and therefore typically don’t even notice when things go wrong, following their programming over the proverbial, and in some cases literal, cliff. This article describes our work on the Meta-Cognitive Loop, a domain-general approach to giving artificial systems the ability to notice, assess, (...)
     
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  20.  52
    Book Reviews Section 3.James L. Jarrett, Walter P. Krolikowski, Charles R. Estes, Hugh C. Black, Charles S. Benson, John Lipkin, Gerald T. Kowitz, Anthony Scarangello, Langston C. Bannister, David N. Campbell, Christine C. Swarm, Steven I. Miller, David H. Ford, William J. Mathis, Don Kauchak, Paul R. Klohr, George W. Bright, Joyce Ann Rich, Edward F. Dash & Marvin Willerman - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (3):155-168.
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  21.  17
    Einstein and the History of General Relativity.Don Howard & John Stachel (eds.) - 1989 - Birkhäuser.
    Based upon the proceedings of the First International Conference on the History of General Relativity, held at Boston University's Osgood Hill Conference Center, North Andover, Massachusetts, 8-11 May 1986, this volume brings together essays by twelve prominent historians and philosophers of science and physicists. The topics range from the development of general relativity (John Norton, John Stachel) and its early reception (Carlo Cattani, Michelangelo De Maria, Anne Kox), through attempts to understand the physical implications of the theory (Jean Eisenstaedt, Peter (...)
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  22.  4
    Pŏp iron: pŏp insik ŭi sahoejŏk chipʻyŏng kwa kŭndaesŏng.Sang-don Yi - 1997 - Sŏul Tʻŭkpyŏlsi: Pagyŏngsa.
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  23.  41
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Theodore Brameld, Midori Matsuyama, Harvey Neufeldt, Lois M. R. Louden, Margaret Gillett, Don Adams, Theodore Hutchcroft, William T. Lowe, Rodney P. Riegle, Timothy J. Bergen Jr, Charles R. Schindler, Gerald L. Gutek, William E. Eaton, Gertrude Langsam, John F. Murphy, Paul D. Travers, Charles M. Dye, Natalie A. Naylor & Richard Edward Kelly - 1977 - Educational Studies 8 (4):395-437.
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  24.  44
    Shedding Light on Keeping People in the Dark.Don Fallis - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (2):535-554.
    We want to keep hackers in the dark about our passwords and our credit card numbers. We want to keep potential eavesdroppers in the dark about our private communications with friends and business associates. This need for secrecy raises important questions in epistemology (how do we do it?) and in ethics (should we do it?). In order to answer these questions, it would be useful to have a good understanding of the concept of keeping someone in the dark. Several philosophers (...)
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  25.  10
    The Recluse of Loyang: Shao Yung and the Moral Evolution of Early Sung Thought.Don J. Wyatt - 1996 - University of Hawaii Press.
    "Few thinkers have stood as squarely at both the center and the periphery of an intellectual movement as has Shao Yung (1011-1077). Ethical model and eccentric, socialite and eremite, Shao Yung is perhaps not only the greatest enigma of early Neo-Confucianism, but also one of its undisputed giants. In this impressive life-and-thought study, Don J. Wyatt painstakingly sifts through all available evidence relating to Shao Yung and his scholarship to provide a portrait that fully exposes the moral center of the (...)
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  26.  43
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Gerald M. Reagan, John L. Harrison, Don Cochrane, Don-Chean Chu, J. Stephen Hazlett, Basil J. Reppas, Robert P. Craig, John L. Elias, Albert E. Bender, Joseph Fashing, Donald K. Sharpes & Russell Dennis - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (4):247-258.
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  27.  16
    Belief in pain.Don Gustafson - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (3):323-345.
    There is a traditional view of pain as a conscious phenomenon which satisfies the following two principles at least: Pain is essentially a belief- or cognition-independent sensation, given for consciousness in an immediate way, and pain′s unitary physical base is responsible for both its phenomenal or felt qualities and it′s functional, causal features. These are "The Raw Feels Principle" and "The Unity of Pain Principle" . Each is shown to be implausible. Evidence comes from recent pain research in a number (...)
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  28.  42
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Robert R. Sherman, Robert E. Belding, John D. Pulliam, Clinton B. Allison, Jack K. Campbell, Llyod P. Williams, Paul T. Rosewell, Janice Ann Beran, Don K. Adams, Russell B. Vlaanderen, Trygve R. Tholfsen & Gene Jensen - 1976 - Educational Studies 7 (1):82-103.
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  29.  24
    Michel Seymour, Pensée, langage et communauté. Une perspective anti-individualiste, Paris-Montréal, Bellarmin-Vrin , 339 p.Don Ross - 1997 - Philosophiques 24 (1):213-217.
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  30.  71
    The abstract variable-binding calculus.Don Pigozzi & Antonino Salibra - 1995 - Studia Logica 55 (1):129 - 179.
    Theabstract variable binding calculus (VB-calculus) provides a formal frame-work encompassing such diverse variable-binding phenomena as lambda abstraction, Riemann integration, existential and universal quantification (in both classical and nonclassical logic), and various notions of generalized quantification that have been studied in abstract model theory. All axioms of the VB-calculus are in the form of equations, but like the lambda calculus it is not a true equational theory since substitution of terms for variables is restricted. A similar problem with the standard formalism (...)
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  31.  19
    The Army's professional military ethic in an era of persistent conflict.Don M. Snider - 2009 - Carlisle, PA: Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College. Edited by Paul Oh & Kevin Toner.
    This essay offers a proposal for the missing constructs and language with which we can more precisely think about and examine the Army's Professional Military Ethic, starting with its macro context which is the profession's culture. We examine three major long-term influences on that culture and its core ethos, thus describing how they evolve over time. We contend that in the present era of persistent conflict, we are witnessing dynamic changes within these three influences. In order to analyze these changes, (...)
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  32.  8
    Language and Experience: Descriptions of Living Language in Husserl and Wittgenstein, by Harry P. Reeder.Don Ihde - 1986 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 17 (2):204-205.
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  33. Once More into the Labyrinth.Don Garrett - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (1):77-87.
    P. J. E. Kail's Projection and Realism in Hume's Philosophy is an excellent book, consisting—like Hume's Treatise itself—of three excellent parts. I will comment on one central aspect of its second part: its explanation of the source of the second thoughts that Hume famously expressed, with a frustrating lack of specificity, about his own initial discussion of personal identity in the Treatise.As is well known, Hume holds in the section "Of personal identity" (T 1.4.6) that a self, mind, or person (...)
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  34. 1. Preface Preface (p. vii).Michael Dickson, Don Howard, Scott Tanona, Mathias Frisch, Eric Winsberg, Arnold Koslow, Paul Teller, Ronald N. Giere, Mary S. Morgan & Mauricio Suárez - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5).
  35.  17
    Explorationism, Evidence Logic and the Question of the Non-necessity of All Belief Systems.Don Faust - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 13:31-38.
    Explorationism (see www.bu.edu/wcp/Papers/Logi/LogiFaus.htm, WCP XX, “Conflict without Contradiction”) is a perspective concerning human knowledge: as yet, our ignorance of the Real World remains great. With this perspective, all our knowledge is so far only partial and tentative. Evidence Logic (EL) (see “The Concept of Evidence”, INTER. JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS 15 (2000), 477‐493) provides an example of a reasonable Base Logic for Explorationism:EL provides machinery for the representation and processing of gradational evidential predications. Syntactically, for any evidence level e, for (...)
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  36. Did God deprive pharaoh of free will?Don Levi - 2008 - Philosophy and Literature 32 (1):pp. 58-73.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Did God Deprive Pharaoh of Free Will?Don LeviWhen Pharaoh was reeling from certain later plagues he agreed to free the Israelites. But each time after the plague stopped, God stiffened Pharaoh's heart, and he refused to let them go. Since it was God who did it, Pharaoh had to refuse to release the Israelites; he could not have let them go. So, he was deprived of free will by (...)
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  37. Parts generate the whole but they are not identical to it.Ross P. Cameron - 2014 - In Aaron J. Cotnoir & Donald L. M. Baxter (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press.
    The connection between whole and part is intimate: not only can we share the same space, but I’m incapable of leaving my parts behind; settle the nonmereological facts and you thereby settle what is a part of what; wholes don’t seem to be an additional ontological commitment over their parts. Composition as identity promises to explain this intimacy. But it threatens to make the connection too intimate, for surely the parts could have made a different whole and the whole have (...)
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  38.  38
    Internal Recurrence.Don Ross - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (1):155-162.
    Paul Churchland does not open his latest book,The Engine of Reason, the Seat of the Soul, modestly. He begins by announcing, “This book is about you. And me … More broadly still, it is about every creature that ever swam, or walked, or flew over the face of the Earth” (p. 3). A few sentences later, he says, “Fortunately, recent research into neural networks … has produced the beginnings of a real understanding of how the biological brain works—a real understanding, (...)
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  39.  28
    Internal recurrence.Don Ross - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (1):155-161.
    It is crucial, first of all, to stress the importance Churchland attaches to the idea that the neural networks whose assemblages he holds to be “engines of reason” must be recurrent. Non-recurrent networks, of the sort best known among philosophers, simply discover patterns in input data presented to them as sets of features. The learning capacities of such networks, extensively discussed since the publication of Rumelhart and McClelland et al., are indeed impressive; and Churchland describes them clearly and gracefully as (...)
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  40.  6
    Pŏphak immun: pŏp ironjŏk, pŏp sahoehakchŏk chŏpkŭn = Einführung in das Recht = Introduction to law.Sang-don Yi - 1997 - Sŏul Tʻŭkpyŏlsi: Pagyŏngsa.
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  41. Hempel's Dilemma and domains of physics.P. Bokulich - 2011 - Analysis 71 (4):646-651.
    Hempel's Dilemma is the claim that physicalism is an ill-formed thesis because it can offer no account of the physics that it refers to: current physics will be discarded in the future, and we don't yet know the nature of future physics. This article confronts the first horn of the dilemma, and argues that our knowledge of current physics is sufficient for offering a physicalist ontology of the mind. We have good scientific evidence that future physics will be irrelevant to (...)
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  42.  34
    John P. Clark, "The Philosophical Anarchism of William Godwin". [REVIEW]Don Locke - 1979 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (4):479.
  43.  4
    Thomas P. Hughes: Human-Built World: How to Think about Technology and Culture. [REVIEW]Don Ihde - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (2):253-255.
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  44. Contraception is not a reductio of Marquis.Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (5):508-510.
    Don Marquis’ future-like-ours account argues that abortion is seriously immoral because itdeprives the embryo or fetus of a valuable future much like our own. Marquis was mindful ofcontraception being reductio ad absurdum of his reasoning, and argued that prior tofertilisation, there is not an identifiable subject of harm. Contra Marquis, Tomer Chaffercontends that the ovum is a plausible subject of harm, and therefore contraception deprives theovum of a future-like-ours. In response, I argue that being an identifiable subject of harm is (...)
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  45. The Eyes Don’t Have It: Fracturing the Scientific and Manifest Images.P. Kyle Stanford - 2012 - Humana Mente 5 (21):19-44.
    Wilfrid Sellars famously argued that we find ourselves simultaneously presented with the scientific and manifest images and that the primary aim of philosophy is to reconcile the competing conceptions of ourselves and our place in the world they offer. I first argue that Sellars’ own attempts at such a reconciliation must be judged a failure. I then go on to point out that Sellars has invited us to join him in idealizing and constructing the manifest and scientific images by conflating (...)
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  46.  13
    L’étude de tout, par tous les moyens ; étude critique de Philosophie de l’esprit, état des lieux (Paris, Vrin, 2000, 337 p.), par Denis Fisette et Pierre Poirier. [REVIEW]Don Ross - 2003 - Philosophiques 30 (1):245.
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  47. How to Be a Truthmaker Maximalist.Ross P. Cameron - 2008 - Noûs 42 (3):410 - 421.
    When there is truth, there must be some thing (or things) to account for that truth: some thing(s) that couldn’t exist and the true proposition fail to be true. That is the truthmaker principle. True propositions are made true by entities in the mind-independently existing external world. The truthmaker principle seems attractive to many metaphysicians, but many have wanted to weaken it and accept not that every true proposition has a truthmaker but only that some important class of propositions require (...)
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  48.  23
    Hume's Defence of Causal Inference (review). [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):126-128.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Hume's Defence of Causal InferenceDon GarrettFred Wilson. Hume's Defence of Causal Inference. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1997. Pp. xii + 439. Cloth, $80.00.According to its introduction, this book "deals solely with the problem of induction [and] solely with the issue of whether Hume is a sceptic with regard to causation and scientific reason" (p. 6). Wilson concludes that although Hume rejects "objective" necessary connections, he is not (...)
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  49.  12
    Frequentist statistical inference without repeated sampling.Paul Vos & Don Holbert - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-25.
    Frequentist inference typically is described in terms of hypothetical repeated sampling but there are advantages to an interpretation that uses a single random sample. Contemporary examples are given that indicate probabilities for random phenomena are interpreted as classical probabilities, and this interpretation of equally likely chance outcomes is applied to statistical inference using urn models. These are used to address Bayesian criticisms of frequentist methods. Recent descriptions of p-values, confidence intervals, and power are viewed through the lens of classical probability (...)
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  50. An Objectivist Argument for Thirdism.Ian Evans, Don Fallis, Peter Gross, Terry Horgan, Jenann Ismael, John Pollock, Paul D. Thorn, Jacob N. Caton, Adam Arico, Daniel Sanderman, Orlin Vakerelov, Nathan Ballantyne, Matthew S. Bedke, Brian Fiala & Martin Fricke - 2008 - Analysis 68 (2):149-155.
    Bayesians take “definite” or “single-case” probabilities to be basic. Definite probabilities attach to closed formulas or propositions. We write them here using small caps: PROB(P) and PROB(P/Q). Most objective probability theories begin instead with “indefinite” or “general” probabilities (sometimes called “statistical probabilities”). Indefinite probabilities attach to open formulas or propositions. We write indefinite probabilities using lower case “prob” and free variables: prob(Bx/Ax). The indefinite probability of an A being a B is not about any particular A, but rather about the (...)
     
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