Results for 'Don Skinner'

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  1.  56
    The Cultural Roots of Professional Wisdom: Towards a Broader View of Teacher Expertise.David Carr & Don Skinner - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):141-154.
    Perhaps the most pressing issue concerning teacher education and training since the end of the Second World War has been that of the role of theory—or principled reflection—in professional expertise. Here, although the main post-war architects of a new educational professionalism clearly envisaged a key role for theory—considering such disciplines as psychology, sociology and philosophy as indispensable for reflective practice—there are nevertheless well-rehearsed difficulties about crediting such disciplines with quite the (applied) role in educational practice of (say) physiology or anatomy (...)
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  2. Quentin Skinner on Interpretation'.Quentin Skinner - 1988 - In James Tully (ed.), Meaning and Context: Quentin Skinner and His Critics. Polity Press. pp. 29--133.
     
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  3. Autobiography of a Metaphysician, the Life of the Late Rev. J. Skinner, with Selected Remains, Ed. By R. Smith.James Skinner & Robert Smith - 1893
     
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  4.  68
    What Things Still Don't Do. [REVIEW]David M. Kaplan - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):229 - 240.
    This paper praises and criticizes Peter-Paul Verbeek’s What Things Do ( 2006 ). The four things that Verbeek does well are: (1) remind us of the importance of technological things; (2) bring Karl Jaspers into the conversation on technology; (3) explain how technology “co-shapes” experience by reading Bruno Latour’s actor-network theory in light of Don Ihde’s post-phenomenology; (4) develop a material aesthetics of design. The three things that Verbeek does not do well are: (1) analyze the material conditions in which (...)
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  5.  63
    Introspection, Revealed Preference and Neoclassical Economics: A Critical Response to Don Ross on the Robbins-Samuelson Argument Pattern.D. Wade Hands - 2008 - Journal of the History of Economic Thought 30:1-26.
    Abstract: Don Ross’ Economic Theory and Cognitive Science (2005) provides an elaborate philosophical defense of neoclassical economics. He argues that the central features of neoclassical theory are associated with what he calls the Robbins-Samuelson argument pattern and that it can be reconciled with recent developments in experimental and behavioral economics, as well as contemporary cognitive science. This paper argues that Ross’ Robbins-Samuelson argument pattern is not in the work of either Robbins or Samuelson and in many ways is in conflict (...)
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  6.  35
    Liberty Exposed: Quentin Skinner's Hobbes and Republican Liberty.Patricia Springborg - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):139-162.
    Quentin Skinner’s dedication to investigating Hobbes’s concept of liberty in a number of essays and books has born some unusual fruit. Not only do we see the enormous problems that Hobbes set himself by proceeding as he did, but Skinner’s careful analysis allows us to chart Hobbes’ ingenuity as he tried to steer a path between the Charybdis of determinism and the Scylla of voluntarism – not very successfully, as we shall see. The upshot is a theory of (...)
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  7.  9
    Reconciling Foucault and Skinner on the State: The Primacy of Politics?Ryan Walter - 2008 - History of the Human Sciences 21 (3):94-114.
    Foucault and Skinner have each offered influential accounts of the emergence of the state as a defining element of modern political thought. Yet the two accounts have never been brought into dialogue; this non-encounter is made more interesting by the fact that Foucault's and Skinner's accounts are at odds with one another. There is therefore much to be gained by examining this divergence. In this article I attempt this task by first setting out the two accounts of the (...)
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  8.  26
    Reflections on Skinner and Pettit.Ian Shapiro - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):185-191.
    This article discusses the concepts of freedom and liberty that Skinner and Pettit identify in Hobbes, and takes issue with them.
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  9.  16
    Utopía y melancolía en Don Quijote.Javier Muguerza - 2010 - Logos 43:63-82.
    The clash between these two dimensions of human condition – but also their complementary nature – make utopia and melancholy specially compelling as they address us today from Don Quixote’s text, providing an accurate standing from which both the author and his protagonist become our contemporaries. Taking an ethic point of departure, we shall consider the aim of the fantasies of Don Quixote is to modify the reality in a certain moral sense, despite of his ridiculously and impractical goals. At (...)
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  10.  10
    Antropología de la donación: el don como principio de la acción humana.Bayron León Osorio Herrera - 2015 - Escritos 23 (50):67-82.
    En muchos lugares y ambientes asistimos a condiciones muy preocupantes para los seres humanos. Las relaciones que establecemos, en ocasiones, no humanizan. Urgen otras posibilidades y condiciones antropológicas para reorientar nuestras acciones y los vínculos con los otros. La antropología de la donación prescribe la gratuidad de la existencia y entiende al hombre como un don. Propone entonces una revisión de muchas categorías antropológicas para instaurar un orden de gratuidad y donación para la existencia.
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  11.  5
    A Problem with Societal Desirability as a Component of Responsible Research and Innovation: The “If We Don’T Somebody Else Will” Argument.John Weckert, Hector Rodriguez Valdes & Sadjad Soltanzadeh - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):215-225.
    The implementation of Responsible Research and Innovation is not without its challenges, and one of these is raised when societal desirability is included amongst the RRI principles. We will argue that societal desirability is problematic even though it appears to fit well with the overall ideal. This discord occurs partly because the idea of societal desirability is inherently ambiguous, but more importantly because its scope is unclear. This paper asks: is societal desirability in the spirit of RRI? On von Schomberg’s (...)
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  12.  11
    Intention and Irony: The Missed Encounter Between Hayden White and Quentin Skinner.Martin Jay - 2013 - History and Theory 52 (1):32-48.
    No contemporary intellectual historian has produced more influential reflections on the historian’s craft than Hayden White and Quentin Skinner, yet their legacy has never been meaningfully compared. Doing so reveals a surprising complementarity in their approach, at least to the extent that Skinner’s stress on recovering the intentionality of authors fits well with White’s observation that irony is the dominant rhetorical mode of historical narrative in our day. Irony itself, to be sure, has to be divided broadly speaking (...)
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  13.  11
    “In Roman Costume and with Roman Phrases”: Skinner, Pettit and Hobbes on Republican Liberty.Christopher Brooke - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):178-184.
    The paper presents a critical discussion of Pettit and Skinner's recent treatments of Hobbes on republican freedom, in particular situating Hobbes's attack on the republican politicians from The Elements of Law in the contexts, first, of other contemporary suspicion directed against those politicians who struck a distinctively “Roman” pose, and, second, of Hobbes's wider psychology of politics, before concluding with some reflections on the relationship between Hobbes's political theory and the project of egalitarian republicanism.
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  14.  11
    Recent Developments in the Thought of Quentin Skinner and the Ambitions of Contextualism.Robert Lamb - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):246-265.
    In this article, I chart some recent developments in the linguistic contextualist philosophy of history defended by Quentin Skinner. I attempt to identify several shifts in the way in which Skinner's position has been presented and justified, focusing particularly on his embrace of anti-foundationalism, his focus on rhetoric rather than speech-acts and his concern to recast contextualism as compatible with other interpretive approaches. In the final section, I reject the notion - suggested by Skinner and others - (...)
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  15.  24
    Book Symposium on Don Ihde's Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science. [REVIEW]Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Larry A. Hickman, Robert Rosenberger, Robert C. Scharff & Don Ihde - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):249-270.
    Book Symposium on Don Ihde’s Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-22 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0060-5 Authors Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Farimagsgade 5 A, Room 10.0.27, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark Larry A. Hickman, The Center for Dewey Studies, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901, USA Robert Rosenberger, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology, DM Smith Building, 685 Cherry Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0345, USA Robert C. Scharff, University of New (...)
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  16. Don Quixote in Broadsheets of the Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries.Johannes Hartau - 1985 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 48:234-238.
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  17. B.F. Skinner on Freedom, Dignity, and the Explanation of Behavior.Robert N. Audi - 1976 - Behaviorism 4 (2):163-186.
     
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  18.  5
    Skinner and Pocock in Context: Early Modern Political Thought Today.Michael Printy - 2009 - History and Theory 48 (1):113-121.
    Annabel Brett and James Tully, ed., Rethinking the Foundations of Modern Political Thought, and D. N. DeLuna, ed., The Political Imagination in History: Essays Concerning J. G. A. Pocock.
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  19.  13
    Interpreting and Appropriating Texts in the History of Political Thought: Quentin Skinner and Poststructuralism.Tony Burns - 2011 - Contemporary Political Theory 10 (3):313-331.
  20.  8
    Anfitrion o la maldad del don.Sánchez Santiago & Antonio José - 2012 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 58:141-154.
    En este artículo se utiliza el mito y la figura de Anfitrión para analizar el juego situacional entre los roles antitéticos, pero también complementarios, del anfitrión y el invitado, así como la dialéctica entre lo privado y lo público. Por último, el mito da pie para analizar el complejo papel de la deuda moral en dicha interactuaciónDon, público, privado, deuda moral, anfitrión, invitado.
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  21. On Skinner's Treatment of the First-Person, Third-Person Psychological Sentence Distinction.Willard F. Day - 1977 - Behaviorism 5 (1):33-37.
     
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  22. Il dialogo tra Unamuno ed Ortega su Don Chisciotte / The Dialogue between Unamuno and Ortega on Don Quixote.Armando Savignano - 2006 - Filosofia Oggi 29 (113):29-44.
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  23.  12
    "After Tocqueville – the Curious Adventures of Bernard-Henri Lévy and Don Watson". [REVIEW]D. N. Byrne - 2013 - Australian Review of Public Affairs - Drawing Board:1-5.
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  24. Radical Epiphenomenalism: B.F. Skinner's Account of Private Events.Richard E. Creel - 1980 - Behaviorism 8 (1):31-53.
     
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  25.  3
    The Variability of Extinction Scores in 'Skinner-Box' Experiments.L. G. Humphreys - 1940 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (6):614.
  26. Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinner’s Contextualism.Tony Burns - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.
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  27. Skinner's Philosophy.Paul T. Sagal - 1981 - University Press of America, C1981.
     
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  28. Wanting Things You Don't Want: The Case for an Imaginative Analogue of Desire.Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan - 2007 - Philosophers' Imprint 7:1-17.
    You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”.
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  29. Don't Know, Don't Kill: Moral Ignorance, Culpability, and Caution.Alexander A. Guerrero - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (1):59-97.
    This paper takes on several distinct but related tasks. First, I present and discuss what I will call the “Ignorance Thesis,” which states that whenever an agent acts from ignorance, whether factual or moral, she is culpable for the act only if she is culpable for the ignorance from which she acts. Second, I offer a counterexample to the Ignorance Thesis, an example that applies most directly to the part I call the “Moral Ignorance Thesis.” Third, I argue for a (...)
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  30. A Review of BF Skinner's Verbal Behavior. [REVIEW]Noam Chomsky, In Leon A. Jakobovits & Murray S. Miron - 1959 - Language 35 (1):26--58.
    I had intended this review not specifically as a criticism of Skinner's speculations regarding language, but rather as a more general critique of behaviorist (I would now prefer to say "empiricist") speculation as to the nature of higher mental processes. My reason for discussing Skinner's book in such detail was that it was the most careful and thoroughgoing presentation of such speculations, an evaluation that I feel is still accurate. Therefore, if the conclusions I attempted to substantiate in (...)
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  31. Why Epistemic Permissions Don't Agglomerate – Another Reply to Littlejohn.Thomas Kroedel - 2013 - Logos and Episteme 4 (4):451–455.
    Clayton Littlejohn claims that the permissibility solution to the lottery paradox requires an implausible principle in order to explain why epistemic permissions don't agglomerate. This paper argues that an uncontentious principle suffices to explain this. It also discusses another objection of Littlejohn's, according to which we’re not permitted to believe lottery propositions because we know that we’re not in a position to know them.
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  32. Now You Know It, Now You Don't.Keith DeRose - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:91-106.
    Resistance to contextualism comes in the form of many very different types of objections. My topic here is a certain group or family of related objections to contextualism that I call “Now you know it, now you don’t” objections. I responded to some such objections in my “Contextualism and Knowledge Attributions” a few years back. In what follows here, I will expand on that earlier response in various ways, and, in doing so, I will discuss some aspects of David Lewis’s (...)
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  33. Internalism About a Person's Good: Don't Believe It.Alexander Sarch - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 154 (2):161-184.
    Internalism about a person's good is roughly the view that in order for something to intrinsically enhance a person's well-being, that person must be capable of caring about that thing. I argue in this paper that internalism about a person's good should not be believed. Though many philosophers accept the view, Connie Rosati provides the most comprehensive case in favor of it. Her defense of the view consists mainly in offering five independent arguments to think that at least some form (...)
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  34.  7
    Don’T Know, Don’T Kill: Moral Ignorance, Culpability, and Caution.Alexander A. Guerrero - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (1):59-97.
    This paper takes on several distinct but related tasks. First, I present and discuss what I will call the "Ignorance Thesis," which states that whenever an agent acts from ignorance, whether factual or moral, she is culpable for the act only if she is culpable for the ignorance from which she acts. Second, I offer a counterexample to the Ignorance Thesis, an example that applies most directly to the part I call the "Moral Ignorance Thesis." Third, I argue for a (...)
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  35.  64
    Meta-Scientific Eliminativism: A Reconsideration of Chomsky's Review of Skinner's Verbal Behavior.J. Collins - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (4):625-658.
    The paper considers our ordinary mentalistic discourse in relation to what we should expect from any genuine science of the mind. A meta-scientific eliminativism is commended and distinguished from the more familiar eliminativism of Skinner and the Churchlands. Meta-scientific eliminativism views folk psychology qua folksy as unsuited to offer insight into the structure of cognition, although it might otherwise be indispensable for our social commerce and self-understanding. This position flows from a general thesis that scientific advance is marked by (...)
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  36.  2
    When Marcel Mauss’s Essai Sur le Don Becomes The Gift: Variations on the Theme of Solidarity.Simone Bateman - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (6):447-461.
    Since the early 1970s, Marcel Mauss’s Essai sur le Don, translated into English as The Gift in 1954, has been a standard reference in the social science and bioethical literature on the use of human body parts and substances for medical and research purposes. At that time, three social scientists—political scientist Richard Titmuss in the United Kingdom and sociologist Renée C. Fox working with historian Judith Swazey in the United States—had the idea of using this concept to highlight the fundamental (...)
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  37. Why You Don’T Want to Get in the Box with Schrödinger's Cat.David Papineau - 2003 - Analysis 63 (1):51–58.
    By way of an example, Lewis imagines your being invited to join Schrödinger’s cat in its box for an hour. This box will either fill up with deadly poison fumes or not, depending on whether or not some radioactive atom decays, the probability of decay within an hour being 50%. The invitation is accompanied with some further incentive to comply (Lewis sets it up so there is a significant chance of some pretty bad but not life-threatening punishment if you don’t (...)
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  38. 'Reviews: Graeme Smith, Singing Australian: A History of Folk and Country Music (Pluto Press, 2005); Bill C. Malone, Don't Get Above Your Raisin': Country Music and the Southern Working Class (University of Illinois Press, 2006). [REVIEW]Clinton Walker - 2007 - Thesis Eleven 89 (1):128-131.
    Reviews: Graeme Smith, Singing Australian: A History of Folk and Country Music ; Bill C. Malone, Don't Get Above Your Raisin': Country Music and the Southern Working Class.
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  39. Don’T Be an Ass: Rational Choice and its Limits.Marc Champagne - 2015 - Reason Papers 37 (1):137-147.
    Deliberation is often seen as the site of human freedom, but the binding power of rationality seems to imply that deliberation is, in its own way, a deterministic process. If one knows the starting preferences and circumstances of an agent, then, assuming that the agent is rational and that those preferences and circumstances don’t change, one should be in a position to predict what the agent will decide. However, given that an agent could conceivably confront equally attractive alternatives, it is (...)
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  40. Don't Fear the Regress: Cognitive Values and Epistemic Infinitism.Scott Aikin - 2009 - Think 8 (23):55-61.
    We are rational creatures, in that we are beings on whom demands of rationality are appropriate. But by our rationality it doesn't follow that we always live up to those demands. In those cases, we fail to be rational , but it is in a way that is different from how rocks, tadpoles, and gum fail to be rational. For them, we use the term ‘arational.’ They don't have the demands, but we do. The demands of rationality bear on us (...)
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  41.  24
    Don Quixote and the Problem of Idealism and Realism in Business Ethics.Sherwin Klein - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):43-63.
    I discuss the characters Don Quixote and Sancho Panza and their relationship in order to understand better the place of idealistictheory and realistic practice in business ethics. The realism of Sancho Panza is required to make the idealism of Don Quixote effective.Indeed, the interaction and development of these characters can serve as a model for both the effective communication between andblending of the idealistic moral theoretician and the practical businessperson. Specifically, I argue that a quixotified Sancho Panza,as a combination of (...)
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  42. Meaning and Context: Quentin Skinner and His Critics.James Tully (ed.) - 1988 - Polity Press.
    Quentin Skinner is one of the leading thinkers in the social sciences and humanities today. Since the publication of his first important articles some two decades ago, debate has continued to develop over his distinctive contributions to contemporary political philosophy, the history of political theory, the philosophy of social science, and the discussion of interpretation and hermeneutics across the humanities and social sciences. Nevertheless, his most valuable essays and the best critical articles concerning his work have been scattered in (...)
     
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  43.  10
    Mind-Independent Values Don’T Exist, But Moral Truth Does.Maarten Van Doorn - 2017 - Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism, Issue Vol 25 No. 1 25 (1):5-24.
    The falsity of moral claims is commonly deduced from two tenets: that they presuppose the existence of objective values and that these values don’t exist. Hence, the error theory concludes, moral claims are false. In this article, I put pressure on the image of human morality that is presupposed in moving from the non-existence of objective values to the falsity of moral claims. I argue that, while, understood in a certain way, the two premises of the error theory are correct, (...)
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  44.  84
    Aging: I Don't Want to Be a Cyborg! [REVIEW]Don Ihde - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):397-404.
    Examination is made of a range of cyborg solutions to bodily problems due to damage, but here with particular reference to aging. Both technological and animal implants, transplants and prosthetic devices are phenomenologically analyzed. The resultant trade-off phenomena are compared to popular culture technofantasies and desires and finally to human attitudes toward mortality and contingency. The parallelism of resistance to contingent existence and to becoming a cyborg is noted.
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  45.  6
    The Double Life of BF Skinner: Inner Conflict, Dissociation and the Scientific Taboo Against Consciousness.Bernard Baars - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (1):5-25.
    B.F. Skinner was the voice of radical behaviourism for some five decades, fighting relentlessly against consciousness as a scientific question. While in public he always argued the case for behaviourism, in fact Skinner was deeply at odds with himself, as he reveals in several books. Surprisingly, as a college student he was deeply interested in becoming a stream-of-consciousness novelist. When that ambition failed, he reacted with a radical rejection of the conscious life. Decades later Skinner's inner struggle (...)
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  46.  11
    The History of Concepts as a Style of Political Theorizing Quentin Skinner's and Reinhart Koselleck's Subversion of Normative Political Theory.Kari Palonen - 2002 - European Journal of Political Theory 1 (1):91-106.
    The history of concepts has partly replaced the older style of the `history of ideas' and can be extended to a critique of normative political theory and, thereby, understood as an indirect style of political theorizing. A common feature in Quentin Skinner's and Reinhart Koselleck's writings lies in their critique of the unhistorical and depoliticizing use of concepts. This concerns especially the classical contractarian theories, and both authors remark that this still holds for work by their contemporary heirs, such (...)
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  47.  4
    The Don Giovanni Moment: Essays on the Legacy of an Opera.Lydia Goehr & Daniel Herwitz (eds.) - 2006 - Columbia University Press.
    The Don Giovanni Moment is the first book to examine the aesthetic and moral legacy of Mozart's masterpiece in the literature, philosophy, and culture of the nineteenth century.
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  48. The Pseudo-Science of B. F. Skinner.Tibor R. Machan - 2006 - Upa.
    The Pseudo-Science of B.F. Skinner was Professor Tibor Machan's first book. Now, nearly forty years after its initial publication and after three dozen additional books published by Machan, it is available again through University Press of America. This study is still alive with its initial inquiry into the work of B.F. Skinner, and it is just as influential upon young students today as it was forty years ago. Was Skinner a bona fide scientist or an amateur metaphysician? (...)
     
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  49.  35
    Don Ihde: Heidegger's Technologies: Postphenomenological Perspectives. [REVIEW]Robert C. Scharff - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (2):297-306.
    Don Ihde: Heidegger’s technologies: Postphenomenological perspectives Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-10 DOI 10.1007/s11007-012-9215-z Authors Robert C. Scharff, Department of Philosophy, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824-3574, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  50.  48
    Psychology, Religion, and Critical Hermeneutics: Don Browning as “Horizon Analyst”.Terry D. Cooper - 2011 - Zygon 46 (3):686-697.
    Abstract. Don Browning's career involved a deep exploration into the frequently hidden philosophical assumptions buried in various forms of psychotherapeutic healing. These healing methodologies were based on metaphors and metaphysical assumptions about both the meaning of human fulfillment and the ultimate context of our lives. All too easily, psychological theories put forward philosophical anthropologies while claiming to be operating within a modest, empirical approach. Browning does not fault or criticize these psychotherapeutic enterprises for making such claims because he thinks these (...)
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