Results for 'Don Thomas Asselin'

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  1.  21
    The Spacing of Decolonial Aesthetics.Don Thomas Deere - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):89-98.
    This essay develops on the aesthetic dimensions of decolonial thought in the work of Rodolfo Kusch and Enrique Dussel, who both point us to non-objectifying modes of thinking and being. Beyond a strictly epistemological approach, decolonial critique ought to offer an account of bodies, spaces, and movements that are the very condition of thought—that is to say, the condition of a mode of thinking otherwise, beyond the dominant colonial paradigm. This account of aesthetics involves the spacing and temporalizing of bodies (...)
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  2.  26
    A Narrow Defense of the Hippocratic Proscription of Killing.Don T. Asselin - 1993 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 67:171-186.
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  3.  21
    The Metaphysics of Edmund Burke.Don T. Asselin - 1995 - International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (1):112-114.
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  4.  32
    Modern Political Philosophy. [REVIEW]Don Asselin - 1990 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (4):573-575.
  5.  33
    The Good Life and Its Pursuit. [REVIEW]Don Asselin - 1988 - Review of Metaphysics 41 (3):614-616.
    The contributors argue that the good is the sovereign moral concept, develop some corresponding norms and analyze some social problems accordingly. The volume is well unified as a collection: it reads very well as a whole.
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  6.  26
    Back to Things in Themselves: A Phenomenological Foundation for Classical Realism. By Josef Seifert. [REVIEW]Don Asselin - 1988 - Modern Schoolman 66 (1):92-94.
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  7.  33
    Studies in the Phenomenology of Sound: I. Listening.Don Ihde & Thomas F. Slaughter - 1970 - International Philosophical Quarterly 10 (2):232-239.
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  8.  18
    The Editors extend their sincere appreciation to the following persons who served as invited reviewers between May 1999 and April 2000. [REVIEW]Don Bialostosky, Barbara Biesecker, Walter Brogan, Thomas Farrell, Maurice Finocchiaro, William W. Fortenbaugh, Eugene Garver, Gerard A. Hauser, Drew Hyland & Michael McDonald - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (4).
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  9.  25
    Axioms for the “Gergonne”-relations.Ivo Thomas & Don Orth - 1959 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 24 (4):305.
  10.  17
    Northwestern university.Newton N. Minow, Thomas G. Ayers, John J. Louis, John J. Nevin, Don H. Reuben & Howard J. Trienens - forthcoming - Minerva.
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  11. Educationa Studies.Joanne Bronars, Jianping Shen, Don Martin Robert J. Beebe, Edward J. Power Jane Gaskell, Clinton B. Allison C. J. B. MacMillan, George R. Knight Samuel Totten, Robert D. Heslep Joseph S. Malikail, S. Pike Hall Dennis L. Carlson, Demise Twohey Thomas A. Brindley & Francis Schrag Thomas P. Thomas - 1993 - Educational Studies 24 (2):101.
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  12.  28
    Wicked Pleasures: Meditations on the Seven "Deadly" Sins.Robert C. Solomon, William Gass, Don Herzog, William Miller, Jerry Neu, James Ogilvy, Thomas Pynchon & Elizabeth Spelman - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The seven deadly sins have provided gossip, amusement, and the plots of morality plays for nearly fifteen hundred years. In Wicked Pleasures, well-known philosopher, business ethicist, and admitted sinner Robert C. Solomon brings together a varied group of contributors for a new look at the old catalogue of sins. Solomon introduces the sins as a group, noting their popularity and pervasiveness. From the formation of the canon by Pope Gregory the Great, the seven have survived the sermonizing of the Reformation, (...)
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  13.  47
    Patrons—Philip Hefner Fund.Solomon H. Katz, William Lesher, Karl E. Peters, Don Browning, Paul H. Carr, Marjorie H. Davis, Thomas L. Gilbert, P. Roger Gillette, Melvin Gray & Lothar Schäfer - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):653-654.
  14.  36
    Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives.Debi Roberson, Ian Davies, Jules Davidoff, Arnold Henselmans, Don Dedrick, Alan Costall, Angus Gellatly, Paul Whittle, Patrick Heelan, Rainer Mausfeld, Jaap van Brakel, Thomas Johansen, Hans Kraml, Joseph Wachelder, Friedrich Steinle & Ton Derksen - 2002 - Upa.
    Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color is the outcome of a workshop, held in Leuven, Belgium, in May 2000.
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  15. Justice and the Meritocratic State.Thomas Mulligan - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Like American politics, the academic debate over justice is polarized, with almost all theories of justice falling within one of two traditions: egalitarianism and libertarianism. This book provides an alternative to the partisan standoff by focusing not on equality or liberty, but on the idea that we should give people the things that they deserve. Mulligan argues that a just society is a meritocracy, in which equal opportunity prevails and social goods are distributed strictly on the basis of merit. That (...)
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  16.  50
    Book Reviews Section 3.Roger R. Woock, Howard K. Macauley Jr, John M. Beck, Janice F. Weaver, Patti Mcgill Peterson, Stanley L. Goldstein, A. Richard King, Don E. Post, Faustine C. Jones, Edward H. Berman, Thomas O. Monahan, William R. Hazard, J. Estill Alexander, William D. Page, Daniel S. Parkinson, Richard O. Dalbey, Frances J. Nesmith, William Rosenfield, Verne Keenan, Robert Girvan & Robert Gallacher - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (2):84-99.
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  17.  12
    William Harvey and the Use of Purpose in the Scientific Revolution: Cosmos by Chance or Universe by Design?Emerson Thomas McMullen.Don Bates - 2000 - Isis 91 (3):588-588.
  18.  7
    Thomas Paine: author of Common sense.Don Rauf - 2018 - New York: Rosen Publishing Group.
    These are the times that try men's souls. When Thomas Paine first published these words in 1776 in The American Crisis, he had no idea that they would not only inspire Americans in the fight for independence but also resonate in tumultuous times ahead. As a journalist in Philadelphia, Paine found the power of the printed word. His pamphlet Common Sense was an early call for American independence, advocating for equality among citizens and a government free of the British (...)
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  19. Davidson was Almost Right about Lying.Don Fallis - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):337-353.
    Donald Davidson once suggested that a liar ?must intend to represent himself as believing what he does not?. In this paper I argue that, while Davidson was mistaken about lying in a few important respects, his main insight yields a very attractive definition of lying. Namely, you lie if and only if you say something that you do not believe and you intend to represent yourself as believing what you say. Moreover, I show that this Davidsonian definition can handle counter-examples (...)
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  20.  73
    What is the Bad-Difference View of Disability?Thomas Crawley - 2022 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 21 (3).
    The Bad-Difference View of disability says, roughly, that disability makes one worse off. The Mere-Difference View of disability says, roughly, that it doesn’t. In recent work, Barnes – a MDV proponent – offers a detailed exposition of the MDV. No BDV proponent has done the same. While many thinkers make it clear that they endorse a BDV, they don’t carefully articulate their view. In this paper, I clarify the nature of the BDV. I argue that its best interpretation is probabilistic (...)
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  21.  87
    Aquinas and modern consequentialism.Don Adams - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):395 – 417.
    Because the moral philosophy of St Thomas Aquinas is egoistic while modern consequentialism is impartialistic, it might at first appear that the former cannot, while the latter can, provide a common value on the basis of which inter-personal conflicts may be settled morally. On the contrary, in this paper I intend to argue not only that Aquinas' theory does provide just such a common value, but that it is more true to say of modern consequentialism than of Thomism that (...)
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  22.  51
    Aquinas and modern contractualism.Don Adams - 2009 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):509 – 530.
    When modern ethical contractualists defend their view against “teleology,” they typically have in mind utilitarian or consequentialist theories according to which valuable states of affairs are to be promoted. But if we look to older teleological theories e.g. that found in the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas we will find a kind of teleology that can be incorporated beneficially into contractualist ethics. In this paper I argue that Scanlon would be well served, on grounds to which he appeals, to (...)
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  23.  59
    Skyrms on the Possibility of Universal Deception.Don Fallis - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (2):375-397.
    In the Groundwork, Immanuel Kant famously argued that it would be self-defeating for everyone to follow a maxim of lying whenever it is to his or her advantage. In his recent book Signals, Brian Skyrms claims that Kant was wrong about the impossibility of universal deception. Skyrms argues that there are Lewisian signaling games in which the sender always sends a signal that deceives the receiver. I show here that these purportedly deceptive signals simply fail to make the receiver as (...)
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  24.  2
    Thomas Paine.Don McLeese - 2005 - Vero Beach, Fla.: Rourke.
    The right to be free -- Born in England -- Raised a Quaker -- School days -- Off to sea -- Meeting Ben Franklin -- "Common sense" -- A fighter and a writer -- For the love of his country -- Rights of man -- The age of reason -- A great patriot -- Time line -- Glossary.
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  25. New books. [REVIEW]J. Gosling, Alan R. White, John Arthur Passmore, William Kneale, Don Locke, C. K. Grant, Thomas McPherson, Peter Nidditch, Martha Kneale, A. C. Ewing & W. F. Hicken - 1965 - Mind 74 (293):126-153.
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  26. Lies, damned lies, and statistics: An empirical investigation of the concept of lying.Adam J. Arico & Don Fallis - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (6):790 - 816.
    There are many philosophical questions surrounding the notion of lying. Is it ever morally acceptable to lie? Can we acquire knowledge from people who might be lying to us? More fundamental, however, is the question of what, exactly, constitutes the concept of lying. According to one traditional definition, lying requires intending to deceive (Augustine. (1952). Lying (M. Muldowney, Trans.). In R. Deferrari (Ed.), Treatises on various subjects (pp. 53?120). New York, NY: Catholic University of America). More recently, Thomas Carson (...)
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  27. Polger on the Illusion of Contingent Identity.Don Merrell - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (4):593 - 602.
    Thomas Polger has argued in favor of the mind-brain type-identity theory, the view that mental states or processes are type-identical to states of the central nervous system. Acknowledging that the type-materialist must respond to Kripke's modal anti-materialist argument, Polger insists that Kripke's argument rests on dubious assumptions concerning the identity conditions of brain states. In brief, Polger claims that one knows that x and y are non-identical when one knows the identity conditions for both x and y. Replace x (...)
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  28.  3
    William Harvey and the Use of Purpose in the Scientific Revolution: Cosmos by Chance or Universe by Design? by Emerson Thomas McMullen. [REVIEW]Don Bates - 2000 - Isis 91:588-588.
  29.  10
    Hume's Theory of Ideas.Don Garrett - 2008 - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), A Companion to Hume. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 39–57.
    This chapter contains section titled: Basic Distinctions Basic Principles References Further Reading.
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  30.  7
    Thomae Sydenham Methodus curandi febres, propriis observationibus superstructa: The Latin Text of the 1666 and 1668 Editions with English Translation from R. G. Latham by Thomas Sydenham. [REVIEW]Don Bates - 1990 - Isis 81:110-111.
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  31.  20
    Thomae Sydenham Methodus curandi febres, propriis observationibus superstructa: The Latin Text of the 1666 and 1668 Editions with English Translation from R. G. Latham . Thomas Sydenham. [REVIEW]Don G. Bates - 1990 - Isis 81 (1):110-111.
  32. The (Metaphysical) Foundations of Arithmetic?Thomas Donaldson - 2017 - Noûs 51 (4):775-801.
    Gideon Rosen and Robert Schwartzkopff have independently suggested (variants of) the following claim, which is a varian of Hume's Principle: -/- When the number of Fs is identical to the number of Gs, this fact is grounded by the fact that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the Fs and Gs. -/- My paper is a detailed critique of the proposal. I don't find any decisive refutation of the proposal. At the same time, it has some consequences which many will (...)
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  33. Why Epistemic Permissions Don’t Agglomerate – Another Reply to Littlejohn.Thomas Kroedel - 2013 - Logos and Episteme 4 (4):451–455.
    Clayton Littlejohn claims that the permissibility solution to the lottery paradox requires an implausible principle in order to explain why epistemic permissions don't agglomerate. This paper argues that an uncontentious principle suffices to explain this. It also discusses another objection of Littlejohn's, according to which we’re not permitted to believe lottery propositions because we know that we’re not in a position to know them.
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  34.  43
    Interpreting Hobbes.Don Herzog - 1988 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 2 (2-3):50-63.
    HOBBES AND THE SOCIAL CONTRACT TRADITION by Jean Hampton Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986. 299 pp., $42.50 THE RHETORIC OF LEVIATHAN: THOMAS HOBBES AND THE POLITICS OF CULTURAL TRANSFORMATION by David Johnston Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986. 234 pp., $25.00 HOBBESIAN MORAL AND POLITICAL THEORY by Gregory S. Kavka Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1986. 460 pp., $45.00, $12.95 HOBBES by Tom Sorell London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986. 163 pp., $34.lb50.
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  35.  70
    Trustworthy medical AI systems need to know when they don’t know.Thomas Grote - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    There is much to learn from Durán and Jongsma’s paper.1 One particularly important insight concerns the relationship between epistemology and ethics in medical artificial intelligence. In clinical environments, the task of AI systems is to provide risk estimates or diagnostic decisions, which then need to be weighed by physicians. Hence, while the implementation of AI systems might give rise to ethical issues—for example, overtreatment, defensive medicine or paternalism2—the issue that lies at the heart is an epistemic problem: how can physicians (...)
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  36.  72
    Ontology and the Ambitions of Metaphysics.Thomas Hofweber - 2016 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press UK.
    Many significant problems in metaphysics are tied to ontological questions, but ontology and its relation to larger questions in metaphysics give rise to a series of puzzles that suggest that we don't fully understand what ontology is supposed to do, nor what ambitions metaphysics can have for finding out about what the world is like. Thomas Hofweber aims to solve these puzzles about ontology and consequently to make progress on four metaphysical debates tied to ontology: the philosophy of arithmetic, (...)
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  37.  27
    What theories of everything don't tell.Thomas Breuer - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (1):137-143.
  38.  11
    What theories of everything don't tell.Thomas Breuer - 1997 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 28 (1):137-143.
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  39. Are We Conditionally Obligated to be Effective Altruists?Thomas Sinclair - 2018 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 46 (1):36-59.
    It seems that you can be in a position to rescue people in mortal danger and yet have no obligation to do so, because of the sacrifice to you that this would involve. At the same time, if you do save anyone, then you must not leave anyone to die whom it would cost you no additional sacrifice to save. On the basis of these claims, Theron Pummer and Joe Horton have recently defended a ‘conditional obligation of effective altruism’, which (...)
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  40.  21
    Don’t Turn Blind! The Relationship Between Exploration Before Ball Possession and On-Ball Performance in Association Football.Thomas B. McGuckian, Michael H. Cole, Geir Jordet, Daniel Chalkley & Gert-Jan Pepping - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  41. Killing the observer.Thomas W. Clark - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):38-59.
    Phenomenal consciousness is often thought to involve a first-person perspective or point of view which makes available to the subject categorically private, first-person facts about experience, facts that are irreducible to third-person physical, functional, or representational facts. This paper seeks to show that on a representational account of consciousness, we don't have an observational perspective on experience that gives access to such facts, although our representational limitations and the phenomenal structure of consciousness make it strongly seem that we do. Qualia (...)
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  42.  39
    The Structure of Scientific Revolutions: 50th Anniversary Edition.Thomas S. Kuhn & Ian Hacking - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. _The Structure of Scientific Revolutions _is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty (...)
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  43.  31
    “I Don't Want to Burst Your Bubble”: Affiliation and Disaffiliation in a Joint Accounting by Affiliated Pair Partners.Thomas Michael Conroy - 1999 - Human Studies 22 (2):339-359.
    This paper examines an excerpt from a larger (televised) interview, wherein various married couples are asked to characterize their living situations in the aftermath of job loss and on the work of description and assessment by interview parties. It thus focuses on features of affiliation and disaffiliation and analyzes how both procedures work, particularly within an environment in which affiliated parties are engaged in attempting to figure out an "unpredictable" outcome of some (mutually experienced or experienceable) situation. In the excerpt, (...)
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  44.  70
    Bias, norms, introspection, and the bias blind spot1.Thomas Kelly - 2024 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 108 (1):81-105.
    In this paper, I sketch a general framework for theorizing about bias and bias attributions. According to the account, paradigmatic cases of bias involve systematic departures from genuine norms. I attempt to show that the account illuminates a number of important psychological phenomena, including: the fact that accusations of bias frequently inspire not only denials but also countercharges of bias (“you only think that I'm biased because you're biased!”); the fact that we tend to see ourselves as less biased than (...)
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  45.  6
    Migrating Characters: Metafiction in Don Quijote and the Aeneid.Thomas Rendall - 2020 - Arion 28 (1):55-62.
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  46.  8
    The Human Element: A Course in Resourceful Thinking.Thomas F. Cleary - 1994 - Shambhala Publications.
    To judge people's true character, pay careful attention to what they do, not to what they say; to develop human resources successfully, first develop your own skills and resources; be exacting without being needlessly demanding; and don't dwell on the present but always look to future goals. These are just a few of the insights revealed in this basic course on how to recognize, organize, and develop human resources. Drawing on essential sources - such as Confucius, Lao Tzu, Sun Tzu, (...)
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  47.  25
    Don't Ban the Sunset in Pharmaceutical Advertising If It Doesn't Darken the Sky.Thomas S. Huddle - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):27-30.
  48.  16
    Now you see it, now you don't: Relations between semantic activation and awareness.Thomas H. Carr & Dale Dagenbach - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):26-27.
  49.  6
    A Formal Analysis of Hollis’ Paradox.Thomas Ågotnes & Chiaki Sakama - 2023 - In Natasha Alechina, Andreas Herzig & Fei Liang (eds.), Logic, Rationality, and Interaction: 9th International Workshop, LORI 2023, Jinan, China, October 26–29, 2023, Proceedings. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 306-321.
    In Hollis’ paradox, A and B each chose a positive integer and whisper their number to C. C then informs them, jointly, that they have chosen different numbers and, moreover, that neither of them are able to work out who has the greatest number. A then reasons as follows: B cannot have 1, otherwise he would know that my number is greater, and by the same reasoning B knows that I don’t have 1. But then B also cannot have 2, (...)
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  50. On ‘Hybrid’ Theories of Personal Good.Thomas Hurka - 2019 - Utilitas 31 (4):450-462.
    ‘Hybrid’ theories of personal good, defended by e.g. Parfit, Wolf, and Kagan, equate it, not with a subjective state such as pleasure on its own, nor with an objective state such as knowledge on its own, but with a whole that supposedly combines the two. These theories apply Moore's principle of organic unities, which says the value of a whole needn't equal the sum of the values its parts would have by themselves. This allows them, defenders say, to combine the (...)
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