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  1.  18
    Minimal Statism and Metamodernism: Reply to Friedman.Donald N. McCloskey - 1992 - Critical Review 6 (1):107-112.
    Friedman misunderstands postmodernism?or, as it could better be called, metamodernism. Metamodernism is the common sense beyond the lunatic formulas of the Vienna Circle and conventional statistics. It has little to do with the anxieties of Continental intellectuals. It therefore is necessary for serious empirical work on the role of the state.
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  2.  38
    How Economists Persuade.Donald N. McCloskey - 1994 - Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (1):15-32.
  3.  35
    History, Differential Equations, and the Problem of Narration.Donald N. McCloskey - 1991 - History and Theory 30 (1):21-36.
    There is a similarity between the most technical scientific reasoning and the most humanistic literary reasoning. While engineers and historians make use of both metaphors and stories, engineers specialize in metaphors, and historians in stories. Placing metaphor, or pure comparison, at one end of a scale and simply a listing of events, or pure story, at the other, it can be seen that what connects them is a theme. The theme providing the connecting link between poles for both the engineer (...)
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  4.  19
    Sartorial Epistemology in Tatters: A Reply to Martin Hollis: Donald N. McCloskey.Donald N. McCloskey - 1985 - Economics and Philosophy 1 (1):134-137.
    Martin Hollis, in the introduction to the collection of Rationality and Relativism he edited recently with Steven Lukes, describes himself as the most arch of arch rationalists, “by which we mean, merely, that [we] reject the forthright relativization of truth and reason.” You might suppose that his self-description would place him unambiguously in the army of traditionalists arrayed against what Richard Rorty fondly calls the New Fuzzies. You might suppose, then, that Hollis would indulge in furious letter writing to, say, (...)
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  5.  19
    Two Replies and a Dialogue on the Rhetoric of Economics: Donald N. McCloskey.Donald N. McCloskey - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):150-166.
  6. The Consequences of Economic Rhetoric.Arjo Klamer, Donald N. McCloskey & Robert M. Solow (eds.) - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    The field of economics proves to be a matter of metaphor and storytelling - its mathematics is metaphoric and its policy-making is narrative. Economists have begun to realize this and to rethink how they speak. This volume is the result of a conference held at Wellesley College, involving both theoretical and applied economists, that explored the consequences of the rhetoric and the conversation of the field of economics.
     
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  7.  3
    Letters.Don Lavoie, Donald N. McCloskey & Peter Hoffenberg - 1987 - Critical Review 1 (3):109-134.
  8. A Bibliography of Historical Economics to 1980.Donald N. McCloskey & Hersh Jr (eds.) - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    Historians and economists will find here what their fields have in common - the movement since the 1950s known variously as 'cliometrics', 'economic history', or 'historical economics'. A leading figure in the movement, Donald McCloskey, has compiled, with the help of George Hersh and a panel of distinguished advisors, a highly comprehensive bibliography of historical economics covering the period up until 1980. The book will be useful to all economic historians, as well as quantitative historians, applied economists, historical demographers, business (...)
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  9.  10
    Reply to Munz.Donald N. McCloskey - 1990 - Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (1):143.
  10.  12
    The Essential Rhetoric of Law, Literature, and Liberty.Donald N. McCloskey - 1991 - Critical Review 5 (2):203-223.
    Three recent books?Richard Posner's Law and Literature, Stanley Fish's Doing What Comes Naturally, and James Boyd White's Justice as Translation? struggle over the relationship of law and literature. Fish and White defend the relevance of literature to law; Posner tries to kill the nascent law and literature movement by hugging it to death. Posner's literary criticism is belles?lettristic, concerned chiefly with how?great? a work is. Fish's is social, emphasizing the interpretative community. White attempts to make a new community, in which (...)
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  11.  50
    The Problem of Audience in Historical Economics: Rhetorical Thoughts on a Text by Robert Fogel.Donald N. McCloskey - 1985 - History and Theory 24 (1):1-22.
    Both history and economics have rhetorics which limit their practitioners as to what sorts of evidence and what sorts of logical appeals they can make if they wish to retain an audience. The thesis of Robert Fogel's Railroads and Economic Growth could be summed up by a three-line proof, but Fogel used courtroom procedure, scientific jargon, statistics, simulation, and the traditions of economic and historical argument to persuade an audience of both historians and economists. It was a book about rhetoric (...)
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  12. Language and Argument in Scholarship and Public Affairs.John S. Nelson, Allan Megill & Donald N. Mccloskey - 1989 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 22 (2):151-154.
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