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  1.  46
    Professional Legal Ethics: Critical Interrogations.Donald Nicolson & Julian Webb - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Professional Legal Ethics: Critical Interrogations provides the first in-depth analysis and sustained critique of the ethics of English and Welsh lawyers. Drawing on a wide variety of disciplines, it argues that professional legal ethics has failed to deliver an approach which requires lawyers actively to engage with the ethical issues raised by legal practice. Through an analysis of the context of legal practice and the core ethical issues facing lawyers, the authors locate this failure in the influence of liberalism and (...)
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  2.  27
    Telling Tales: Gender Discrimination, Gender Construction and Battered Women Who Kill. [REVIEW]Donald Nicolson - 1995 - Feminist Legal Studies 3 (2):185-206.
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  3.  3
    Afterword: In Defence of Contextually Sensitive Moral Activism.Donald Nicolson - 2004 - Legal Ethics 7 (2):269-275.
  4.  16
    Lawyers' Duties, Adversarialism and Partisanship in UK Legal Ethics.Donald Nicolson & Julian Webb - 2004 - Legal Ethics 7 (2):133-140.
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  5.  15
    Mapping Professional Legal Ethics: The Form and Focus of the Codes.Donald Nicolson - 1998 - Legal Ethics 1 (1):51.
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  6.  12
    Institutionalizing Trust: Ethics and the Responsive Regulation of the Legal Profession.Julian Webb & Donald Nicolson - 1999 - Legal Ethics 2 (2):148.
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  7.  13
    Calling, Character and Clinical Legal Education: A Cradle to Grave Approach to Inculcating a Love for Justice.Donald Nicolson - 2013 - Legal Ethics 16 (1):36-56.
    This article argues that lawyers have personal moral obligations to help ensure that no one who needs legal services goes without and hence that the practice of law should be seen as involving a calling to promote access to justice. One important aim of the law schools should thus be to inculcate in their students a sense of this calling and ideally to ensure that this notion of 'altru-ethical' professionalism becomes part of each lawyer's moral character. Drawing on educational theory, (...)
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  8.  1
    The Theoretical Turn in Professional Legal Ethics.Donald Nicolson - 2004 - Legal Ethics 7 (1):17-23.
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