12 found
Order:
  1.  8
    Aging, DNA Information, and Authorship: Medawar, Schrödinger, and Samuel Butler.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2020 - Biological Theory 15 (1):50-55.
    Eminent scientists are well-placed to bring the novel works of others, even if not in their own areas of expertise, to general attention. In so doing, they may be able to extend original accounts or introduce new terminologies, but they are basically messengers, not innovators. In the 1940s an evolutionary theory of biological aging was explained by Peter Medawar, and informational concepts relating to DNA were explained by Erwin Schrödinger. Both explanations were eventually traced back to the Victorian polymath Samuel (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  32
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-–Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On a statistical basis a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  15
    The Selfish Gene Revisited: Reconciliation of Williams-Dawkins and Conventional Definitions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):246-255.
    Sightings of the revolutionary comet that appeared in the skies of evolutionary biology in 1976—the selfish gene—date back to the 19th and early 20th centuries. It became generally recognized that genes were located on chromosomes and compete with each other in a manner consistent with the later appellation “selfish.” Chromosomes were seen as disruptable by the apparently random “cut and paste” process known as recombination. However, each gene was only a small part of its chromosome. On a statistical basis a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  3
    Heredity as Transmission of Information: Butlerian 'Intelligent Design'.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2006 - Centaurus 48 (3):133-148.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  8
    Introns First.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):196-203.
    Knowing how introns originated should greatly enhance our understanding of the information we carry in our DNA. Gilbert’s suggestion that introns initially arose to facilitate recombination still stands, though not for the reason he gave. Reanney’s alternative, that evolution, from the early “RNA world” to today’s DNA-based world, would require the ability to detect and correct errors by recombination, now seems more likely. Consistent with this, introns are richer than exons in the potential to extrude the stem-loop structures needed for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  7
    Ohno's Hypothesis and Muller's Paradox: Sex Chromosome Dosage Compensation May Serve Collective Gene Functions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (11):930-933.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  15
    Base Composition, Speciation, and Why the Mitochondrial Barcode Precisely Classifies.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (3):157-168.
    While its mechanism and biological significance are unknown, the utility of a short mitochondrial DNA sequence as a “barcode” providing accurate species identification has revolutionized the classification of organisms. Since highest accuracy was achieved with recently diverged species, hopes were raised that barcodes would throw light on the speciation process. Indeed, a failure of a maternally donated, rapidly mutating, mitochondrial genome to coadapt its gene products with those of a paternally donated nuclear genome could result in developmental failure, thus creating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  28
    Wittgenstein’s Certainty is Uncertain: Brain Scans of Cured Hydrocephalics Challenge Cherished Assumptions.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (4):336-342.
    The philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein chose as his prime exemplar of certainty the fact that the skulls of normal people are filled with neural tissue, not sawdust. In 1980 the British pediatrician John Lorber reported that some normal adults, apparently cured of childhood hydrocephaly, had no more than 5 % of the volume of normal brain tissue. While initially disbelieved, Lorber’s observations have since been independently confirmed by clinicians in France and Brazil. Thus Wittgenstein’s certainty has become uncertain. Furthermore, the paradox (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  14
    Doctor-Scientist-Patients Who Barketh Not: The Quantified Self-Movement and Crowd-Sourcing Research.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (6):1024-1027.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    Joel S. Schwartz. Darwin's Disciple: George John Romanes, a Life in Letters. Xxi + 806 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2010. $60. [REVIEW]Donald R. Forsdyke - 2011 - Isis 102 (3):579-580.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  8
    Immunology : The Natural Selection Theory, the Two Signal Hypothesis and Positive Repertoire Selection.Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):139-161.
    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne’s later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: 1–9), (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  9
    Immunology (1955-1975): The Natural Selection Theory, the Two Signal Hypothesis and Positive Repertoire Selection. [REVIEW]Donald R. Forsdyke - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):139 - 161.
    Observations suggesting the existence of natural antibody prior to exposure of an organism to the corresponding antigen, led to the natural selection theory of antibody formation of Jerne in 1955, and to the two signal hypothesis of Forsdyke in 1968. Aspects of these were not only first discoveries but also foundational discoveries in that they influenced contemporaries in a manner that, from our present vantage point, appears to have been constructive. Jerne's later hypothesis (1971, European Journal of Immunology 1: 1-9), (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark