Results for 'Donald Strong'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Against Strong Speciesism.Donald Graft - 1997 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):107–118.
    Speciesism, difference of treatment based on an appeal to species membership, is often likened to racism and sexism, and condemned on those grounds. Some philosophers, however, reject this argument by analogy and instead forward an argument for speciesism based on a postulated right of species to compete for survival. This paper attacks this strong form of speciesism by showing that the underlying concept of ‘species’ is incoherent in the context of morality, and that strong speciesism has unacceptable corollaries.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  2.  43
    Associative Encoding and Retrieval: Weak and Strong Cues.Donald M. Thomson & Endel Tulving - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):255.
  3.  81
    Null Hypotheses in Ecology.Donald R. Strong - 1980 - Synthese 43 (2):271-285.
  4. Ecology.Donald Strong & Daniel Simberloff - unknown
    Ecology is composed of a remarkably diverse set of scientific disciplines. There are many different sub-fields in ecology—physiological, behavioral, evolutionary, population, community, ecosystem, and landscape ecology. Clearly, no summary will do them all justice. However, for the present context, ecology as a science can be divided into three basic areas—population, community, and ecosystem ecology. This entry will introduce some of the fundamental philosophical issues raised by these three disciplines. The first order of business is to ask what is the science (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  29
    Law's Halo: DONALD H. REGAN.Donald H. Regan - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (1):15-30.
    Like many people these days, I believe there is no general moral obligation to obey the law. I shall explain why there is no such moral obligation – and I shall clarify what I mean when I say there is no moral obligation to obey the law – as we proceed. But also like many people, I am unhappy with a position that would say there was no moral obligation to obey the law and then say no more about the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  14
    Null Hypotheses in Ecology.Donald R. Strong Jr - 1980 - Synthese 43 (2):271 - 285.
  7.  24
    Donald Phillip Verene, "Vico's Science of Imagination". [REVIEW]E. W. Strong - 1983 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (2):273.
  8.  7
    The Exemplars of a Strong Whole Were Rated as More Similar Than Were the Exemplars of a Weak Whole.Donald L. King - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (1):51-53.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  12
    Biosemiotics and Constructivism: Strong Allies. Review of “Essential Readings in Biosemiotics” Edited by Donald Favareau.K. Bielecka - 2012 - Constructivist Foundations 7 (3):228-230.
    Upshot: The reader presents a unique collection of the most important works in biosemiotics. It spans 880 pages, describing classical and modern theories, with excerpts from the most significant papers on the topic of biosemiotics, as well as suggesting further reading on the topic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  10
    On the Existence of Strongly Normal Ideals overP Κ Λ.Donna M. Carr, Jean -Pierre Levinski & Donald H. Pelletier - 1990 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 30 (1):59-72.
    For every uncountable regular cardinalκ and any cardinalλ≧κ,P κ λ denotes the set $\left\{ {x \subseteqq \lambda :\left| x \right|< \kappa } \right\}$ . Furthermore, < denotes the binary operation defined inP κ λ byx (...))
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11.  37
    The Ethical Context in Organizations: Influences on Employee Attitudes and Behaviors.Donald L. McCabe - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):447-476.
    This field survey focused on two constructs that have been developed to represent the ethical context in organizations: ethical climate and ethical culture. We first examined issues of convergence and divergence between these constructs through factor analysis andcorrelational analysis. Results suggested that the two constructs are measuring somewhat different, but strongly related dimensions ofthe ethical context. We then investigated the relationships between the emergent ethical context factors and an ethics-related attitude(organizational commitment) and behavior (observed unethical conduct) for respondents who work (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   200 citations  
  12.  5
    On the Existence of Strongly Normal Ideals overP Κ Λ.Donna M. Carr, Jean-Pierre Levinski & Donald H. Pelletier - 1990 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 30 (1):59-72.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Do Economists Make Markets?: On the Performativity of Economics.Donald MacKenzie, Fabian Muniesa & Lucia Siu (eds.) - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Around the globe, economists affect markets by saying what markets are doing, what they should do, and what they will do. Increasingly, experimental economists are even designing real-world markets. But, despite these facts, economists are still largely thought of as scientists who merely observe markets from the outside, like astronomers look at the stars. Do Economists Make Markets? boldly challenges this view. It is the first book dedicated to the controversial question of whether economics is performative--of whether, in some cases, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  14. Self-Interest and Public Interest in Western Politics.Donald Lavery (ed.) - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    Although Professor Lewin is not testing existing views that, for people in politics, 'egoism rules' on deep theoretical grounds, he strongly argues that empirical facts do not support such views and thus opens a new chapter in the debate on individuals' rationality.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. What’s Special About Humeanism.Donald Hubin - 1999 - Noûs 33 (1):30-45.
    One of the attractions of the Humean instrumentalist theory of practical rationality is that it appears to offer a special connection between an agent's reasons and her motivation. The assumption that Humeanism is able to assert a strong connection between reason and motivation has been challenged, most notably by Christine Korsgaard. She argues that Humeanism is not special in the connection it allows to motivation. On the contrary, Humean theories of practical rationality do connect reasons and motivation in a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  16.  33
    Firm Newness, Entrepreneurial Orientation, and Ethical Climate.Donald Neubaum, Marie Mitchell & Marshall Schminke - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):335-347.
    Faced with the liability of newness, a scarcity of resources, and concerns of survival, new firms frequently encounter difficult ethical decisions and might be pressured to make choices that run counter to the tenets of more developed ethical and moral reasoning. This study explores the impact of newness and entrepreneurial orientation on the ethical climate of firms. Data collected from 304 individuals across 37 firms indicated that firm newness was more strongly related to ethical climate than was an entrepreneurial orientation. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  17.  61
    Consciousness as Self-Function.Donald R. Perlis - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):509-25.
    I argue that consciousness is an aspect of an agent's intelligence, hence of its ability to deal adaptively with the world. In particular, it allows for the possibility of noting and correcting the agent's errors, as actions performed by itself. This in turn requires a robust self-concept as part of the agent's world model; the appropriate notion of self here is a special one, allowing for a very strong kind of self-reference. It also requires the capability to come to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  18. Jews in the Gentile World.Isacque Graeber, Steuart Henderson Britt, Donald S. Strong, Jacob R. Marcus, Raphael Mahler & Bernard Dov Weinryb - 1942 - Science and Society 6 (4):388-394.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Body in Late-Capitalist Usa.Donald M. Lowe - 1995 - Duke University Press.
    In _The Body in Late-Capitalist USA_, Donald M. Lowe explores the varied social practices that code and construct the body. Arguing that our bodily lives are shaped by a complex of daily and ongoing practices—how we work, what we buy and consume—Lowe contends that as a result of the commodification of these and other social practices in the late-twentieth century, what we often understand to be the needs of the body are in fact means for capital accumulation. Moving beyond (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  20.  80
    Entailment with Near Surety of Scaled Assertions of High Conditional Probability.Donald Bamber - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 29 (1):1-74.
    An assertion of high conditional probability or, more briefly, an HCP assertion is a statement of the type: The conditional probability of B given A is close to one. The goal of this paper is to construct logics of HCP assertions whose conclusions are highly likely to be correct rather than certain to be correct. Such logics would allow useful conclusions to be drawn when the premises are not strong enough to allow conclusions to be reached with certainty. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21.  47
    Law's Halo.Donald H. Regan - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (1):15.
    Like many people these days, I believe there is no general moral obligation to obey the law. I shall explain why there is no such moral obligation – and I shall clarify what I mean when I say there is no moral obligation to obey the law – as we proceed. But also like many people, I am unhappy with a position that would say there was no moral obligation to obey the law and then say no more about the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  5
    The Value and Limits of Academic Speech: Philosophical, Political, and Legal Perspectives.Donald Alexander Downs & Chris W. Surprenant (eds.) - 2018 - Routledge.
    Free speech has been a historically volatile issue in higher education. In recent years, however, there has been a surge of progressive censorship on campus. This wave of censorship has been characterized by the explosive growth of such policies as "trigger warnings" for course materials; "safe spaces" where students are protected from speech they consider harmful or distressing; "micro-aggression" policies that often strongly discourage the use of words that might offend sensitive individuals; new "bias-reporting" programs that consist of different degrees (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. The Ethical Context in Organizations: Influences on Employee Attitudes and Behavior.Linda Klebe Treviño, Kenneth D. Butterfield & Donald L. Mccabe - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):447-476.
    This field survey focused on two constructs that have been developed to represent the ethical context in organizations: ethical climate and ethical culture. We first examined issues of convergence and divergence between these constructs through factor analysis andcorrelational analysis. Results suggested that the two constructs are measuring somewhat different, but strongly related dimensions ofthe ethical context. We then investigated the relationships between the emergent ethical context factors and an ethics-related attitude and behavior for respondents who work in organizations with and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   249 citations  
  24.  27
    Donald Davidson.Robert Hanna - 1992 - Review of Metaphysics 45 (4):854-856.
    In the early 1980s, along the hallways of many Anglo-American philosophy departments, one began to hear rumors of a "Davidsonic boom." Then a few years later, in a widely-read article in the New York Review of Books, Ian Hacking announced that Donald Davidson was the top contemporary philosopher. Without a doubt, Davidson has a strong claim upon this office; his carefully-crafted, highly original work in the philosophy of mind, the metaphysics of causation, action theory, semantic theory, and epistemology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  13
    Probabilism, Emergentism, and Pluralism: A Naturalistic Metaphysics of Radical Materialism.Donald A. Crosby - 2016 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 37 (3):217-227.
    William James and Alfred North Whitehead strongly rejected materialism as a metaphysical option. While James lived and wrote only up to the beginning of the revolution in physics that brought to the fore fundamentally different theories such as quantum theory and the special and general theories of relativity, Whitehead, as an accomplished mathematician, was readily conversant with these new developments. Since their respective times, however, much innovation and refinement of theories in physics and other natural sciences has taken place. With (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Words and Objections: Essays on the Work of W. V. Quine.Donald Davidson & Jaakko Hintikka (eds.) - 1969 - Dordrecht, Netherland: Reidel.
    It is gratifying to see that philosophers' continued interest in Words and Objections has been so strong as to motivate a paperback edition. This is gratifying because it vindicates the editors' belief in the permanent im portance of Quine's philosophy and in the value of the papers com menting on it which were collected in our volume. Apart from a couple of small corrections, only one change has been made. The list of Professor Quine's writings has been brought up (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  24
    Beyond Extensions of Liberalism Martha Nussbaum ,Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership(Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006), 512 Pp., £21.95/$35.00 Cloth, £12.95/$18.95 Paper. Bernard Williams ,In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument(Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005), 200 Pp., £18.95/$29.95 Cloth, £10.95/$17.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Donald Beggs - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):157-166.
    Not only does a shared expertise in classical philosophy and literature inform the works of Martha Nussbaum and Bernard Williams, each has also written and spoken on contemporary social and political issues. Given such ranges of reference, it is not surprising that their two recent books, Frontiers of Justice, a treatise, and In the Beginning Was the Deed, selected essays, confidently take up fundamental political questions. Yet these books differ in their intentions, organising structures, and discursive strategies, and they have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Norms of Truthfulness and Non-Deception in Kantian Ethics.Donald Wilson - 2015 - In Pablo Muchnik Oliver Thorndike (ed.), Rethinking Kant Volume 4. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 111-134.
    Questions about the morality of lying tend to be decided in a distinctive way early in discussions of Kant’s view on the basis of readings of the false promising example in his Groundwork of The metaphysics of morals. The standard deception-as-interference model that emerges typically yields a very general and strong presumption against deception associated with a narrow and rigorous model subject to a range of problems. In this paper, I suggest an alternative account based on Kant’s discussion of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  5
    On the Critique of `Utilitarian' Theories of Action.Donald N. Levine - 2000 - Theory, Culture and Society 17 (1):63-78.
    Although Parsons encountered the works of both Simmel and Weber during his stay at Heidelberg in the late 1920s, his appropriation of the two became increasingly asymmetrical, issuing in a lifelong devotion to Weber and a pronounced disavowal of Simmel around the time Parsons published The Structure of Social Action. This reaction deprived Parsons of the substantial support he could have found in Simmel's work for his effort to counteract `utilitarian' theories of action. Simmel not only went beyond Parsons in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  30.  22
    Some Observations on the Global Practice of Socially Responsible Investment.Donald H. Schepers - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:164-169.
    This research applies the notion of sustainability (Barney, 1991; Braa, Monteiro, & Sahay, 2004) to the mechanisms used by socially responsible investment(SRI) firms with respect to their stakeholders (investors and target firms). A contrast is developed between US and UK SRI firms. It is noted that screens, while maintaining a strong investor base, are less sustainable from the perspective of the firms targeted by SRI funds, whereas advocacy has stronger elements of sustainability with respect to the relations with corporations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. The Multiplicity of Interpreted Worlds: Inner and Outer Perspectives.Donald A. Crosby - 2022 - Lexington Books.
    This book argues that the subjective and the objective are crucially dependent on one another and neither is intelligible apart from the other. There is no such thing as a purely external, in-itself world. This book is not intended as a defense of epistemological relativism but as a strong recommendation for modest fallibilism and pluralism.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  38
    The Evidence for Degrees of Being in Aristotle.Donald Morrison - 1987 - Classical Quarterly 37 (2):382-401.
    The topic of degrees of being in Aristotle is almost universally ignored. A very few scholars do discuss the topic or make use of it in passing. This situation mightbe explained by a scholarly consensus that Aristotle did have a doctrine ofdegrees of being, but this doctrine is too uninteresting to be worth much discussion. But a rather different consensus lies behind the current silence. Many experts in the subject deny that Aristotle believed in degrees of being.No one, to my (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  99
    The Philosophy of Donald T. Campbell: A Short Review and Critical Appraisal. [REVIEW]Franz M. Wuketits - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (2):171-188.
    Aside from his remarkable studies in psychology and the social sciences, Donald Thomas Campbell (1916–1996) made significant contributions to philosophy, particularly philosophy of science,epistemology, and ethics. His name and his work are inseparably linked with the evolutionary approach to explaining human knowledge (evolutionary epistemology). He was an indefatigable supporter of the naturalistic turn in philosophy and has strongly influenced the discussion of moral issues (evolutionary ethics). The aim of this paper is to briefly characterize Campbells work and to discuss (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  26
    Art History?Donald Brook - 2004 - History and Theory 43 (1):1–17.
    This article is presented in two parts. In part I, I call into question the viability of a currently received opinion about the foundations of the subject called “Art History,” primarily by challenging assumptions that are implicit in conventional uses of the terms “art” and “work of art.” It is widely supposed that works of art are items of a kind, that this kind is the bearer of the name “art,” and that it has a history. In part II, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  10
    The Myth of the Rational Voter?Donald Wittman - 2008 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 20 (3):359-375.
    While Bryan Caplan’s theory of rational irrationality is important and original, he does not actually demonstrate that the theory explains public opinion about economics. The theory holds that voters are aware of the insignificance of their votes, and therefore feel free to vote based on whatever beliefs they “prefer” to hold, regardless of whether or not these beliefs are true. Yet by voting, voters suggest that they do not, in fact, understand that the odds against their votes “counting” are astronomical. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36.  6
    Ethics- Perceived or Reasoned From Principles?: A Rejoinder to Korn, Huelsman, and Reed.Donald L. Mosher & Susan B. Bond - 1992 - Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):203 – 214.
    In response to Korn, Huelsman, and Reed's (1992)question, "Who defines those interests, and how serious must the setback be?" (p. 126), we argue that a wrongful (unjust) harm (a setback of interest) is not equivalent to a hurt (a temporary distressing mental state) and that the interests of importance are welfare interests (general means to our ulterior aims), not just a desire to avoid unpleasant mental states (hurts). To set back a welfare interest is to reverse its course or to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  2
    Patient Consent Preferences on Sharing Personal Health Information During the COVID-19 Pandemic: “The More Informed We Are, the More Likely We Are to Help”.Sarah Tosoni, Indu Voruganti, Katherine Lajkosz, Shahbano Mustafa, Anne Phillips, S. Joseph Kim, Rebecca K. S. Wong, Donald Willison, Carl Virtanen, Ann Heesters & Fei-Fei Liu - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-15.
    Background Rapid ethical access to personal health information to support research is extremely important during pandemics, yet little is known regarding patient preferences for consent during such crises. This follow-up study sought to ascertain whether there were differences in consent preferences between pre-pandemic times compared to during Wave 1 of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and to better understand the reasons behind these preferences. Methods A total of 183 patients in the pandemic cohort completed the survey via email, and responses were (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  69
    The Knowledge Deficit: Closing the Shocking Education Gap for American Children.Eric Donald Hirsch - 2006 - Houghton Mifflin.
    Perhaps our most insightful thinker on what schools teach, E. D. Hirsch, Jr., shows why American students--beginning with a fourth-grade slump--perform less well than students in other industrialized countries. Drawing on classroom observation, the history of ideas, and current scientific understanding of the patterns of intellectual growth, Hirsch builds the case that our schools have indeed made progress in teaching the mechanics of reading. But, as he brilliantly shows, they fail virtually all American children--poor and middle class, in public and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  49
    The Theory of Planned Behavior as a Model of Academic Dishonesty in Engineering and Humanities Undergraduates.Trevor S. Harding, Matthew J. Mayhew, Cynthia J. Finelli & Donald D. Carpenter - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):255 – 279.
    This study examines the use of a modified form of the theory of planned behavior in understanding the decisions of undergraduate students in engineering and humanities to engage in cheating. We surveyed 527 randomly selected students from three academic institutions. Results supported the use of the model in predicting ethical decision-making regarding cheating. In particular, the model demonstrated how certain variables (gender, discipline, high school cheating, education level, international student status, participation in Greek organizations or other clubs) and moral constructs (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  40.  11
    If you build it, they will come: unintended future uses of organised health data collections.Kieran C. O’Doherty, Emily Christofides, Jeffery Yen, Heidi Beate Bentzen, Wylie Burke, Nina Hallowell, Barbara A. Koenig & Donald J. Willison - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):54.
    Health research increasingly relies on organized collections of health data and biological samples. There are many types of sample and data collections that are used for health research, though these are collected for many purposes, not all of which are health-related. These collections exist under different jurisdictional and regulatory arrangements and include: 1) Population biobanks, cohort studies, and genome databases 2) Clinical and public health data 3) Direct-to-consumer genetic testing 4) Social media 5) Fitness trackers, health apps, and biometric data (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41.  16
    The Many and the One: Religious and Secular Perspectives on Ethical Pluralism in the Modern World.Richard Madsen & Tracy B. Strong (eds.) - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    The war on terrorism, say America's leaders, is a war of Good versus Evil. But in the minds of the perpetrators, the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington were presumably justified as ethically good acts against American evil. Is such polarization leading to a violent "clash of civilizations" or can differences between ethical systems be reconciled through rational dialogue? This book provides an extraordinary resource for thinking clearly about the diverse ways in which humans see good and evil. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  99
    The Environmental Ethics of the Pythagoreans.J. Donald Hughes - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (3):195-213.
    Two conflicting tendencies may be discerned in Pythagorean ethics as applied to the environment: on the one hand, a sense of reverence for nature and kinship with all life that opposed killing and other forms of interference in the natural world, and on the other hand, a doctrine of the separability of soul and body which denigrates the body and the external world of which it is apart. The prescriptive content of Pythagorean ethics includes prohibitions against taking life, even in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  36
    Anomalous Monism and Mental Causality : On the Debate of Donald Davidson’'s Philosophy of the Mental'.Erwin Rogler & Gerhard Preyer - unknown
    The English version of the first chapter of Erwin Rogler and Gerhard Preyer: Materialismus, anomaler Monismus und mentale Kausalität. Zur gegenwärtigen Philosophie des Mentalen bei Donald Davidson und David Lewis »Anomaler Monismus und Mentale Kausalität. Ein Beitrag zur Debatte über Donald Davidsons Philosophie des Mentalen« is a contribution to the current debates on the philosophy of the mental and mental causality initiated from Donald Davidson's philosophy with his article »Mental Events«. It is the intent of the English (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Critical Terms for the Study of Buddhism.Donald S. Lopez Jr - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    Over the past century, Buddhism has come to be seen as a world religion, exceeding Christianity in longevity and, according to many, philosophical wisdom. Buddhism has also increasingly been described as strongly ethical, devoted to nonviolence, and dedicated to bringing an end to human suffering. And because it places such a strong emphasis on rational analysis, Buddhism is considered more compatible with science than the other great religions. As such, Buddhism has been embraced in the West, both as an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Relations Between Singapore and the People’s Republic of China in the Light of Donald Trump’s New Southeast Asia Policy.Mateusz Chatys - 2019 - International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal 23 (1):133-148.
    The aim of the article is to analyze the relationship between Singapore and the People’s Republic of China in the light of the current policy of the President of the United States Donald Trump. The point of reference for the presented analysis is the foreign policy of the former President Barack Obama, based on the strategy known as “pivot to Asia” – the strategic turnabout of the United States to the Asia-Pacific region. One of its main objectives was the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  6
    Reconsidering Scarce Drug Rationing: Implications for Clinical Research.Zev M. Nakamura, Douglas P. MacKay, Arlene M. Davis, Elizabeth R. Brassfield, Benny L. Joyner Jr & Donald L. Rosenstein - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):16-16.
    Hospital systems commonly face the challenge of determining just ways to allocate scarce drugs during national shortages. There is no standardised approach of how this should be instituted, but principles of distributive justice are commonly used so that patients who are most likely to benefit from the drug receive it. As a result, clinical indications, in which the evidence for the drug is assumed to be established, are often prioritised over research use. In this manuscript, we present a case of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  18
    Growing Food, Growing a Movement: Climate Adaptation and Civic Agriculture in the Southeastern United States.Carrie Furman, Carla Roncoli, Donald R. Nelson & Gerrit Hoogenboom - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (1):69-82.
    This article examines the role that civic agriculture in Georgia plays in shaping attitudes, strategies, and relationships that foster both sustainability and adaptation to a changing climate. Civic agriculture is a social movement that attracts a specific type of “activist” farmer, who is linked to a strong social network that includes other farmers and consumers. Positioning farmers’ practices within a social movement broadens the understanding of adaptive capacity beyond how farmers adapt to understand why they do so. By drawing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Networking Practitioner Research.Colleen McLaughlin, Kristine Black-Hawkins, Donald McIntyre & Andrew Townsend - 2007 - Routledge.
    A complement to _Researching Schools_ by the same authors, this book provides readers with a strong theoretical framework for school-based research as well as valuable advice on the ways in which networks of specialist groups can work together to create a broad-ranging approach to educational research. Through a critical examination of existing research and current thinking, the authors draw out implications for the effective policy and practice of school-based research. Illustrated throughout with case studies and including a full and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  21
    Davidson’s Meta-Normative Naturalism.Robert Myers - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (2).
    Although Donald Davidson is best known for his account of motivating reasons, towards the end of his life he did write about normative reasons, arguing for a novel form of realism we might call anomalous naturalism: anomalous, because it is not just non-reductive but also non-revisionary, refusing to compromise in any way on the thought that the prescriptive authority of normative reasons is objective and reaches to all possible agents; naturalism, because it still treats normative properties as perfectly ordinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  66
    Davidson on Metaphorical Meaning: A Reply to Stainton.John Michael Mcguire - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (2):355-.
    That the central thesis of Donald Davidson’s classic article on metaphor “What Metaphor Means” (WMM) is ambiguous between a weak and a strong interpretation is the primary claim that I sought to establish in my article “Sentence Meaning, Speaker Meaning, and Davidson’s Denial of Metaphorical Meaning.” In addition to this, I argued that the weak claim is trivially true and the strong claim is obviously false. Therefore, I concluded that when the central thesis of WMM is disambiguated, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000