Results for 'Donald W. Hardigree'

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  1.  32
    The Relationship Between Ethical and Customer-Oriented Service Provider Behaviors.Vince Howe, K. Douglas Hoffman & Donald W. Hardigree - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (7):497 - 506.
    This study examines the relationship between the ethical behavior and customer orientation of insurance sales agents engaged in the selling of complex services, e.g. health, life, auto, and property insurance. The effect of ethical and customer-oriented behavior, measured by the SOCO scale (Saxe and Weitz, 1982), on the annual premiums generated by the agents is also investigated. Customeroriented sales agents are found to engage in less unethical behavior than their sales-oriented counterparts. Further, sales-oriented agents are found to perceive greater levels (...)
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  2.  27
    An Ethic for Enemies: Forgiveness in Politics.Donald W. Shriver - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Our century has witnessed violence on an unprecedented scale, in wars that have torn deep into the fabric of national and international life. And as we can see in the recent strife in Bosnia, genocide in Rwanda, and the ongoing struggle to control nuclear weaponry, ancient enmities continue to threaten the lives of masses of human beings. As never before, the question is urgent and practical: How can nations--or ethnic groups, or races--after long, bitter struggles, learn to live side by (...)
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  3.  62
    Hume's Philosophy of Common Life.Donald W. Livingston - 1984 - University of Chicago Press.
  4.  8
    Honest Patriots: Loving a Country Enough to Remember its Misdeeds.Donald W. Shriver - 2005 - Oup Usa.
    Donald Shriver argues that recognition of morally negative events in American history is essential to the health of our society. The failure to acknowledge and repent of these events skews the relations of many Americans to one another and breeds ongoing hostility. Focusing on the wrongs suffered by African Americans and Native Americans, Shriver examines the challenges associated with the call for collective repentance: What can it mean to morally master a past whose victims are dead and whose sufferings (...)
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  5. Strict Vegetarianism is Immoral.Donald W. Bruckner - 2015 - In Ben Bramble & Fischer Bob (eds.), The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat. Oxford University Press. pp. 30-47.
    The most popular and convincing arguments for the claim that vegetarianism is morally obligatory focus on the extensive, unnecessary harm done to animals and to the environment by raising animals industrially in confinement conditions (factory farming). I outline the strongest versions of these arguments. I grant that it follows from their central premises that purchasing and consuming factoryfarmed meat is immoral. The arguments fail, however, to establish that strict vegetarianism is obligatory because they falsely assume that eating vegetables is the (...)
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  6.  89
    Kant’s Aesthetic Theory.Donald W. Crawford - 1974 - [Madison]University of Wisconsin Press.
    Immanuel Kant was a German philosopher. He is a central figure of modern philosophy, and set the terms by which all subsequent thinkers have had to grapple. He argued that human perception structures natural laws, and that reason is the source of morality. His thought continues to hold a major influence in contemporary thought, especially in fields such as metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics.
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  7. In Defense of Adaptive Preferences.Donald W. Bruckner - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 142 (3):307 - 324.
    An adaptive preference is a preference that is regimented in response to an agent’s set of feasible options. The fabled fox in the sour grapes story undergoes an adaptive preference change. I consider adaptive preferences more broadly, to include adaptive preference formation as well. I argue that many adaptive preferences that other philosophers have cast out as irrational sour-grapes-like preferences are actually fully rational preferences worthy of pursuit. I offer a means of distinguishing rational and worthy adaptive preferences from irrational (...)
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  8. Against the Tedium of Immortality.Donald W. Bruckner - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (5):623-644.
    Abstract In a well-known paper, Bernard Williams argues that an immortal life would not be worth living, for it would necessarily become boring. I examine the implications for the boredom thesis of three human traits that have received insufficient attention in the literature on Williams? paper. First, human memory decays, so humans would be entertained and driven by things that they experienced long before but had forgotten. Second, even if memory does not decay to the extent necessary to ward off (...)
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  9.  91
    The Experience of Landscape.Donald W. Crawford - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (3):367-369.
  10. Present Desire Satisfaction and Past Well-Being.Donald W. Bruckner - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):15 - 29.
    One version of the desire satisfaction theory of well-being (i.e., welfare, or what is good for one) holds that only the satisfaction of one's present desires for present states of affairs can affect one's well-being. So if I desire fame today and become famous tomorrow, my well-being is positively affected onlyif tomorrow, when I am famous, I still desire to be famous. Call this the present desire satisfaction theory of well-being. I argue, contrary to this theory, that the satisfaction of (...)
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  11.  44
    Institutional Corruption of Pharmaceuticals and the Myth of Safe and Effective Drugs.Donald W. Light, Joel Lexchin & Jonathan J. Darrow - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):590-600.
    Over the past 35 years, patients have suffered from a largely hidden epidemic of side effects from drugs that usually have few offsetting benefits. The pharmaceutical industry has corrupted the practice of medicine through its influence over what drugs are developed, how they are tested, and how medical knowledge is created. Since 1906, heavy commercial influence has compromised congressional legislation to protect the public from unsafe drugs. The authorization of user fees in 1992 has turned drug companies into the FDA's (...)
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  12.  8
    Die Psychologie der Verrücktheit.Donald W. Winnicott - 2018 - Psyche 72 (4):254-266.
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  13.  18
    Mechanisms Underlying an Ability to Behave Ethically.Donald W. Pfaff, Martin Kavaliers & Elena Choleris - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (5):10 – 19.
    Cognitive neuroscientists have anticipated the union of neural and behavioral science with ethics (Gazzaniga 2005). The identification of an ethical rule—the dictum that we should treat others in the manner in which we would like to be treated—apparently widespread among human societies suggests a dependence on fundamental human brain mechanisms. Now, studies of neural and molecular mechanisms that underlie the feeling of fear suggest how this form of ethical behavior is produced. Counterintuitively, a new theory presented here states that it (...)
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  14.  11
    Institutional Corruption of Pharmaceuticals and the Myth of Safe and Effective Drugs.Donald W. Light, Joel Lexchin & Jonathan J. Darrow - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):590-600.
    Institutional corruption is a normative concept of growing importance that embodies the systemic dependencies and informal practices that distort an institution’s societal mission. An extensive range of studies and lawsuits already documents strategies by which pharmaceutical companies hide, ignore, or misrepresent evidence about new drugs; distort the medical literature; and misrepresent products to prescribing physicians. We focus on the consequences for patients: millions of adverse reactions. After defining institutional corruption, we focus on evidence that it lies behind the epidemic of (...)
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  15.  22
    Gegenstandstheoretische Grundlagen der Logik Und Logistik.Donald W. Fisher - 1914 - Philosophical Review 23 (4):470-471.
  16.  21
    ‘The Definition of Situation’: Some Theoretical and Methodological Consequences of Taking W. I. Thomas Seriously.Donald W. Ball - 1972 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 2 (1):61–82.
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  17.  80
    A Key to Whitehead's Process and Reality.Donald W. Sherburne - 1966 - University of Chicago Press.
    Whitehead's magnum opus is as important as it is difficult. It is the only work in which his metaphysical ideas are stated systematically and completely, and his metaphysics are the heart of his philosophical system as a whole.
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  18.  28
    Philosophical Melancholy and Delirium: Hume's Pathology of Philosophy.Donald W. Livingston - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Here Donald Livingston traces this distinction through all of Hume's writings and reveals its relevance for contemporary discussion.
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  19.  7
    Logic for Problem Solving.Donald W. Loveland - 1982 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 47 (2):477-478.
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  20.  33
    Gun Control and Alcohol Policy.Donald W. Bruckner - 2018 - Social Theory and Practice 44 (2):149-177.
    Hugh LaFollette, Jeff McMahan, and David DeGrazia endorse the most popular and convincing argument for the strict regulation of firearms in the U.S. The argument is based on the extensive, preventable harm caused by firearms. DeGrazia offers another compelling argument based on the rights of those threatened by firearms. My thesis is a conditional: if these usual arguments for gun control succeed, then alcoholic beverages should be controlled much more strictly than they are, possibly to the point of prohibition. The (...)
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  21.  12
    Gun Control and Alcohol Policy in Advance.Donald W. Bruckner - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
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  22. A Short History of Buddhism.Donald W. Mitchell - 1982 - Philosophy East and West 32 (1):109-111.
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  23.  25
    Hume: A Re-Evaluation.Donald W. Livingston & James T. King (eds.) - 1976 - Fordham University Press.
  24.  75
    Deconstructing and Reconstructing Theory of Mind.Sara M. Schaafsma, Donald W. Pfaff, Robert P. Spunt & Ralph Adolphs - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):65-72.
    Usage of the term ‘theory of mind’ (ToM) has exploded across fields ranging from developmental psychology to social neuroscience and psychiatry research. However, its meaning is often vague and inconsistent, its biologi- cal bases are a subject of debate, and the methods used to study it are highly heterogeneous. Most crucially, its original definition does not permit easy downward translation to more basic processes such as those stud- ied by behavioral neuroscience, leaving the interpreta- tion of neuroimaging results opaque. We (...)
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  25. Kant.Donald W. Crawford - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  26. The Real World Failure of Evidence-Based Medicine.Donald W. Miller & Clifford Miller - 2011 - International Journal of Person Centered Medicine 1 (2):295-300.
    As a way to make medical decisions, Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) has failed. EBM's failure arises from not being founded on real-world decision-making. EBM aspires to a scientific standard for the best way to treat a disease and determine its cause, but it fails to recognise that the scientific method is inapplicable to medical and other real-world decision-making. EBM also wrongly assumes that evidence can be marshaled and applied according to an hierarchy that is determined in an argument by authority to (...)
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  27.  7
    A Whiteheadian Aesthetic.Donald W. Sherburne - 1961 - Archon Books.
  28.  50
    Colburn on Covert Influences.Donald W. Bruckner - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (4):451-457.
    In , Ben Colburn claims that preferences formed through covert influences are defective. I show that Colburn's argument fails to establish that anything is wrong with preferences formed in this manner.
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  29.  9
    Essays on Realist Instance Ontology and its Logic.Donald W. Mertz - 2006 - De Gruyter.
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  30.  36
    Silent Prudence.Donald W. Bruckner - 2009 - Philosophical Explorations 12 (3):349-364.
    It is commonly recognized that not all actions are candidates for moral evaluation. For instance, morality is silent on the issue whether to tie one's right shoe before one's left shoe or the other way around. This shoe-tying action is not a candidate for moral appraisal. The matter is amoral, for neither alternative is morally required nor forbidden, and both are permissible. It is not commonly recognized that not all actions are candidates for prudential evaluation. I shall argue, however, that (...)
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  31.  28
    The Concept of Structure in Galileo: Its Role in the Methods of Proportionality and "Ex Suppositione" as Applied to the Tides.Donald W. Mertz - 1982 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 13 (2):111.
    It is generally agreed that Galileo’s distinctive place in the history of science is due to the power of his method, and that, in general terms, this consists in an effective combination of mathematics and physical experiment. In attempting to be more specific, some authors have assigned a particular method to Galileo as either new or a unique adaptation of a traditional method, e.g. hypothetico-deduction, the method of analysis, or ex suppositione. William Wallace, for example, has argued that by the (...)
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  32.  17
    Twenty Questions: Efficiency in Problem Solving as a Function of Size of Group.Donald W. Taylor & William L. Faust - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (5):360.
  33.  24
    On Galileo's Method of Causal Proportionality.Donald W. Mertz - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (3):229.
    It is a common occurence to find Galileo claimed as the father of modern science, particularly as to his method being appropriate for its pursuit. Yet, it is apparent from the literature that little agreement has been reached concerning the specifics of the structure and nature of his method(s). Galileo himself is explicit in little more than describing it as „geometrical“, and as such contrasting its greater demonstrative power with that of the traditional Peripatetic logic. One is then left with (...)
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  34.  40
    A Sellarsian Hume?Donald W. Livingston - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):281-290.
  35.  31
    Will Lower Drug Prices Jeopardize Drug Research? A Policy Fact Sheet.Donald W. Light & Joel Lexchin - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):1 – 4.
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  36.  10
    Decentering Whitehead.Donald W. Sherburne - 1986 - Process Studies 15 (2):83-94.
  37.  54
    On Evidence, Medical and Legal.Donald W. Miller & Clifford Miller - 2005 - Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons 10 (3):70-75.
    Medicine, like law, is a pragmatic, probabilistic activity. Both require that decisions be made on the basis of available evidence, within a limited time. In contrast to law, medicine, particularly evidence-based medicine as it is currently practiced, aspires to a scientific standard of proof, one that is more certain than the standards of proof courts apply in civil and criminal proceedings. But medicine, as Dr. William Osler put it, is an "art of probabilities," or at best, a "science of uncertainty." (...)
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  38.  7
    What Is Cinema? [REVIEW]Donald W. Crawford - 1969 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 3 (3):159.
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  39. Subjective Well-Being and Desire Satisfaction.Donald W. Bruckner - 2010 - Philosophical Papers 39 (1):1-28.
    There is a large literature in empirical psychology studying what psychologists call 'subjective well-being'. Only limited attention has been given to these results by philosophers who study what we call 'well-being'. In this paper, I assess the relevance of the empirical results to one philosophical theory of well-being, the desire satisfaction theory. According to the desire satisfaction theory, an individual's well-being is enhanced when her desires are satisfied. The empirical results, however, show that many of our desires are disappointed in (...)
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  40.  7
    The Athenian Casualty Lists.Donald W. Bradeen - 1969 - Classical Quarterly 19 (01):145-.
    In the continuing discussion and debate over the development of letter-forms in fifth-century Athens, the official casualty lists from the public cemetery have played little part. One of them, however, the so-called ‘Koroneia’ epigram and related fragments , has been used in the argument by H. B. Mattingly, who has assigned it to Delion and claims its tailed rho for the 420s. But, the epigraphical argument aside, it seems to me that in so doing he has ignored two important characteristics (...)
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  41.  95
    Second-Order Preferences and Instrumental Rationality.Donald W. Bruckner - 2011 - Acta Analytica 26 (4):367-385.
    A second-order preference is a preference over preferences. This paper addresses the role that second-order preferences play in a theory of instrumental rationality. I argue that second-order preferences have no role to play in the prescription or evaluation of actions aimed at ordinary ends. Instead, second-order preferences are relevant to prescribing or evaluating actions only insofar as those actions have a role in changing or maintaining first-order preferences. I establish these claims by examining and rejecting the view that second-order preferences (...)
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  42.  8
    Buddhist Faith and Sudden Enlightenment.Donald W. Mitchell - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (1):102-104.
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  43.  32
    Can Disputes Over Censorship Be Resolved?Donald W. Crawford - 1968 - Ethics 78 (2):93-108.
  44.  18
    An Instance Ontology for Structures: Their Definition, Identity, and Indiscernibility.Donald W. Mertz - 2003 - Metaphysica: International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics 4 (1):127-64.
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  45.  8
    Obscenity and Public Morality.Donald W. Crawford & Harry M. Clor - 1970 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 4 (3):139.
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  46.  52
    The “Whitehead Without God” Debate: The Rejoinder.Donald W. Sherburne - 1971 - Process Studies 1 (2):101-113.
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  47.  17
    Hume's Dialogues Revisited.Donald W. Harward - 1975 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (3):137 - 153.
  48. The Meaning of Demonstration in Hobbes Science.Donald W. Hanson - 1990 - History of Political Thought 11 (4):587-626.
  49.  53
    Rational Responsibility for Preferences and Moral Responsibility for Character Traits.Donald W. Bruckner - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32:191-209.
    A theory of rationality evaluates actions and actors as rational or irrational. Assessing preferences themselves as rational or irrational is contrary to the orthodox view of rational choice. The orthodox view takes preferences as given, holding them beyond reproach, and assesses actions as rational or irrational depending on whether the actions tend to serve as effective means to the satisfaction of the given preferences. Against this view, this paper argues that preferences themselvesare indeed proper objects of rational evaluation. This evaluation (...)
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  50.  31
    A Contractarian Account of (Part of) Prudence.W. Bruckner Donald - 2003 - American Philosophical Quarterly 40 (1):33 - 46.
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