Results for 'Donatist Martyr Stories'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Ontv Angen Boeken (Livres Re<;: Us-Eingesandte Schriften-Books Received). [REVIEW]Donatist Martyr Stories - 1997 - Bijdragen, Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie En Theologie 58 (2).
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  34
    Church Fathers M. Edwards: Optatus: Against the Donatists . (Translated Texts for Historians, 27.) Pp. Xxxi + 222, 2 Maps. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1997. Paper, £12.50. ISBN: 0-85323-752-2. A. T. Fear: Lives of the Visigothic Fathers . (Translated Texts for Historians, 26.) Pp. Xxxix + 167, 1 Map. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1997. Paper, £9.95. ISBN: 0-85323-582-1. M. A. Tilley: Donatist Martyr Stories: The Church in Conflict in Roman North Africa . (Translated Texts for Historians, 24.) Pp. Xxxvi + 101, 1 Map. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1996. Paper, £9.95. ISBN: 0-85323-931-2. L. R. Wickham: Hilary of Poitiers: Conflicts of Conscience and Law in the Fourth-Century Church . (Translated Texts for Historians, 25.) Pp. Xxvi + 128. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 1997. Paper, £9.95. ISBN: 0-85323-572-. [REVIEW]Mark Humphries - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (01):84-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Donatist Martyr Stories: The Church in Conflict in Roman North Africa (Trans., with Notes and Introd., Maureen A. Tilley). [REVIEW]W. H. C. Frend - 1998 - Heythrop Journal 39:335-335.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Imagining Stories: Attitudes and Operators.Neil Van Leeuwen - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-26.
    This essay argues that there are theoretical benefits to keeping distinct—more pervasively than the literature has done so far—the psychological states of imagining that p versus believing that in-the-story p, when it comes to cognition of fiction and other forms of narrative. Positing both in the minds of a story’s audience helps explain the full range of reactions characteristic of story consumption. This distinction also has interesting conceptual and explanatory dimensions that haven’t been carefully observed, and the two mental state (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  50
    A Hybrid Formal Theory of Arguments, Stories and Criminal Evidence.Floris J. Bex, Peter J. van Koppen, Henry Prakken & Bart Verheij - 2010 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (2):123-152.
    This paper presents a theory of reasoning with evidence in order to determine the facts in a criminal case. The focus is on the process of proof, in which the facts of the case are determined, rather than on related legal issues, such as the admissibility of evidence. In the literature, two approaches to reasoning with evidence can be distinguished, one argument-based and one story-based. In an argument-based approach to reasoning with evidence, the reasons for and against the occurrence of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  6.  36
    Legal Stories and the Process of Proof.Floris Bex & Bart Verheij - 2013 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 21 (3):253-278.
    In this paper, we continue our research on a hybrid narrative-argumentative approach to evidential reasoning in the law by showing the interaction between factual reasoning (providing a proof for ‘what happened’ in a case) and legal reasoning (making a decision based on the proof). First we extend the hybrid theory by making the connection with reasoning towards legal consequences. We then emphasise the role of legal stories (as opposed to the factual stories of the hybrid theory). Legal (...) provide a coherent, holistic legal perspective on a case. They steer what needs to be proven but are also selected on the basis of what can be proven. We show how these legal stories can be used to model a shift of the legal perspective on a case, and we discuss how gaps in a legal story can be filled using a factual story (i.e. the process of reasoning with circumstantial evidence). Our model is illustrated by a discussion of the Dutch Wamel murder case. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  7.  42
    On Becoming Better Human Beings: Six Stories to Live By.Stein M. Wivestad - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (1):55-71.
    What are the conditions required for becoming better human beings? What are our limitations and possibilities? I understand “becoming better” as a combined improvement process bringing persons “up from” a negative condition and “up to” a positive one. Today there is a tendency to understand improvement in a one-sided way as a movement up to the mastery of cognitive skills, neglecting the negative conditions that can make these skills mis-educative. I therefore tell six stories in the Western tradition about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8. Narratives and Culture: The Role of Stories in Self-Creation.Arran Gare - 2002 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2002 (122):80-100.
    The condition of postmodernity has been associated with the depreciation of narratives. Here it is argued that stories play a primordial role in human self-creation, underpinning more abstract discourses such as mathematics, logic and science. This thesis is defended telling a story of the evolution of European culture from Ancient Greece to the present, including an account of the rise of the notion of culture and its relation to the development of history, thereby showing how stories function to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  12
    Victims' Stories of Human Rights Abuse: The Ethics of Ownership, Dissemination, and Reception.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2018 - Metaphilosophy 49 (1-2):40-57.
    This paper addresses three commentaries on Victims' Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights. In response to Vittorio Bufacchi, it argues that asking victims to tell their stories needn't be coercive or unjust and that victims are entitled to decide whether and under what conditions to tell their stories. In response to Serene Khader, it argues that empathy with victims' stories can contribute to building a culture of human rights provided that measures are taken to overcome (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  70
    The Clerk's Tale and the Grammar of Assent.Linda Georgianna - 1995 - Speculum 70 (4):793-821.
    The Clerk's Tale is the most elusive and least reassuring of Chaucer's religious tales. Though bad things happen to good people in the other religious narratives in the Canterbury collection, repeated assurances in those tales confirm that the world is governed by a powerful God intent on rewarding his faithful followers. By comparison, the Clerk and his tale are disturbingly silent on the subject of God's plan until the very end, leading many readers to categorize the tale as secular, developing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  13
    The Power of Stories: Responsibility for the Use of Autobiographical Stories in Mental Health Debates.Lisa Bortolotti & Anneli Jefferson - 2019 - Diametros 60:18-33.
    Autobiographical stories do not merely offer insights into someone’s experience but can constitute evidence or even serve as self-standing arguments for a given viewpoint in the context of public debates. Such stories are likely to exercise considerable influence on debate participants’ views and behaviour due to their being more vivid, engaging, and accessible than other forms of evidence or argument. In this paper we are interested in whether there are epistemic and moral duties associated with the use of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    On Changing Organizational Cultures by Injecting New Ideologies: The Power of Stories[REVIEW]William A. Wines & I. I. I. Hamilton - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):433 - 447.
    Recent corporate legal and ethical meltdowns suggest that avoiding such harms to companies and to society requires a significant culture change within the organization. This paper addresses the issue of what it takes to change a corporate culture. While conventional wisdom may suggest that a change requires only the institution of an ethics office with proper reporting paths and an ethics code, such an approach is only a beginning. Many large corporations, especially those in danger of legal and ethical catastrophes, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  26
    Educational Stories: Engaging Teachers in Educational Theory.David Dewhurst & Stephen Lamb - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):907–917.
    A common complaint among those involved in teaching the educational foundations is the reluctance of many trainee teachers to engage in issues of educational theory. This is particularly apparent with those trainees who are more concerned with managing classrooms of children than grappling with what are often abstract and difficult ideas. This paper considers the current use of educational stories as a pedagogical strategy in teacher training, and a story that has been used in this way is presented. It (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  64
    The Role of Evaluation-Driven Rejection in the Successful Exploration of a Conceptual Space of Stories.Carlos León & Pablo Gervás - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (4):615-634.
    Evaluation processes are a basic component of creativity. They guide not only the pure judgement about a new artefact but also the generation itself, as creators constantly evaluate their own work. This paper proposes a model for automatic story generation based on the evaluation of stories. A model of how quality in stories is evaluated is presented, and two possible implementations of the generation guided by this evaluation are shown: exhaustive space exploration and constrained exploration. A theoretical model (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  16
    Non Poena Sed Causa.Adam Ployd - 2018 - Augustinian Studies 49 (1):25-44.
    This article examines Augustine’s anti-Donatist claim that it is not the punishment but the cause that makes a martyr. Augustine’s non poena sed causa argument arises as part of the larger rhetoric of martyrdom that recent scholarship has highlighted in late antiquity. I argue here that a more specific look at classical rhetorical techniques can provide a better understanding of what Augustine is up to in his particular rhetoric of martyrdom. To that end, after providing an overview of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. The Stories We Live By: Narrative in Ethical Enquiry with Children.Grace Clare Robinson - 2014 - Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):305-330.
    Many readers will be familiar with the power of stories to stimulate rich, ethically-focussed philosophical enquiry with communities of children and young people. This paper presents a view of the relationship between ethics and narrative that attempts to explain why this is the case. It is not an accident that moral matters are illuminated in stories, nor is the explanation for this fitness for purpose merely pragmatic, or a matter of convention. Narrative is at the heart of learning (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  16
    Algorithms and Stories.W. Teed Rockwell - 2013 - Human Affairs 23 (4):633-644.
    For most of human history, human knowledge was considered to be something that was stored and captured by words. This began to change when Galileo said that the book of nature is written in the language of mathematics. Today, Dan Dennett and many others argue that all genuine scientific knowledge is in the form of mathematical algorithms. However, recently discovered neurocomputational algorithms can be used to justify the claim that there is genuine knowledge which is non-algorithmic. The fact that these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Theodicy and Auschwitz.James Mensch - unknown
    The word “theodicy” comes from the Greek words for God (theos) and justice (diké). Although coined by Leibniz, the attempt it represents is far older. In the Jewish tradition, it stretches to the beginning—that is to the stories of Genesis with their attempts to explain how evil could exist in a world created by God. God, after each creative act, sees that his creations are “good.” Women, however, bear their children in pain (Gn 3:16) and the ground, sprouting “thorns (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  13
    The Social Function of Autobiographical Stories in the Personal and Virtual World: An Initial Investigation.Nicole Alea, Susan Bluck, Emily L. Mroz & Zanique Edwards - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):794-810.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  64
    Applying Stories of the Environment to Business: What Business People Can Learn From the Virtues in Environmental Narratives.David Dawson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):37-49.
    . The use of narrative to communicate and convey particular points of view in society has increasingly become the focus of academic attention in recent years. In particular, MacIntyre. (1985, 1988, 1990, 1999) has paid attention to the role of narrative in the conflict between different traditions when developing his virtue approach to ethics. Whilst there has been continued debate about the application of virtue approaches, some arguing that it is incompatible with business, I disagree and have already argued for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Thinking Stories Philosophical Inquiry for Children.Philip Cam & Ken Rinkel - 1993
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22.  48
    Stories at the Memory-Imagination Interface.Myrdene Anderson & Devika Chawla - 2010 - Semiotics:233-241.
    We two semioticians, separated by a generation or two, by geography of a continent or two, and by discipline, launch a fresh metalogue to probe the semiosic behavior of storying.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  6
    The Hybrid Theory of Stories and Arguments Applied to the Simonshaven Case.Floris J. Bex - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  26
    Old Testament Stories with a Freudian Twist.Leo Abse - 2011 - Karnac Books.
    This collection of Leo Abse's last essays are writings that he was working on from 2006 up to and during his final illness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Bedtime Stories of Jewish Values.Shmuel Blitz - 1998 - Mesorah Publications.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Zen Masters of China: The First Step East: Zen Stories.Richard Bryan McDaniel & Albert Low (eds.) - 2012 - Tuttle Publishing.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  87
    Intentional Action, Folk Judgments, and Stories: Sorting Things Out.Alfred R. Mele & Fiery Cushman - 2007 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):184–201.
    How are our actions sorted into those that are intentional and those that are not? The philosophical and psychological literature on this topic is livelier now than ever, and we seek to make a contribution to it here. Our guiding question in this article is easy to state and hard to answer: How do various factors— specifically, features of vignettes—that contribute to majority folk judgments that an action is or is not intentional interact in producing the judgment? In pursuing this (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  28.  59
    Models, Stories and the Economic World.Mary S. Morgan - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (3):361-384.
    Stories form an integral part of models. An economic model can not be fully characterized simply by knowing its structure: the model can only be completely described when we know how it works and what it can do. This activity of manipulating a model requires a narrative device, such as a question, which sets off a story told with the model. The structure or system portrayed in the model constrains and shapes the stories that can be told, but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  29. Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will.John Martin Fischer - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: "meaning in life and death : our stories" -- John Martin Fischer and Anthony B rueckner, "Why is death bad?", Philosophical studies, vol. 50, no. 2 (September 1986) -- "Death, badness, and the impossibility of experience," Journal of ethics -- John Martin Fischer and Daniel Speak, "Death and the psychological conception of personal identity," Midwest studies in philosophy, vol. 24 -- "Earlier birth and later death : symmetry through thick and thin," Richard Feldman, Kris McDaniel, Jason R. Raibley, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  30.  29
    Should We Tell Implicit Bias Stories?Jennifer Saul - 2018 - Disputatio 10 (50):217-244.
    As the phenomenon of implicit bias has become increasingly widely known and accepted, a variety of criticisms have similarly gained in prominence. This paper focuses on one particular set of criticisms, generally made from the political left, of what Sally Haslanger calls “implicit bias stories”—a broad term encompassing a wide range of discourses from media discussions to academic papers to implicit bias training. According to this line of thought, implicit bias stories are counterproductive because they serve to distract (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31. The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D'Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32.  48
    Exploding Stories and the Limits of Fiction.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-18.
    It is widely agreed that fiction is necessarily incomplete, but some recent work postulates the existence of universal fictions—stories according to which everything is true. Building such a story is supposedly straightforward: authors can either assert that everything is true in their story, define a complement function that does the assertoric work for them, or, most compellingly, write a story combining a contradiction with the principle of explosion. The case for universal fictions thus turns on the intuitive priority we (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Educating Character Through Stories.David Carr & Tom Harrison - 2015 - Imprint Academic.
    What could be the point of teaching such works of bygone cultural and literary inheritance as Cervantes' _Don Quixote_ and Shakespeare’s _The Merchant of Venic_e in schools today? This book argues that the narratives and stories of such works are of neglected significance and value for contemporary understanding of human moral association and character. However, in addition to offering detailed analysis of the moral educational potential of these and other texts, the present work reports on a pioneering project, recently (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  34. Narratives and the Ethics and Politics of Environmentalism: The Transformative Power of Stories.Arran Gare - 2001 - Theory and Science 2 (1):1-10.
    By revealing the centrality of stories to action, to social life and to inquiry together with the implicit assumptions in polyphonic stories about the nature of humans, of life and of physical reality, this paper examines the potential of stories to transform civilization. Focussing on the failure of environmentalists so far in the face of the global ecological crisis, it is shown how ethics and political philosophy could be reconceived and radical ecology reformulated and reinvigorated by appreciating (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  35.  44
    On Stories.Richard Kearney - 2001 - Routledge.
    Stories offer us some of the richest and most enduring insights into the human condition and have preoccupied philosophy since Aristotle. On Stories presents in clear and compelling style just why narrative has this power over us and argues that the unnarrated life is not worth living. Drawing on the work of James Joyce, Sigmund Freud's patient 'Dora' and the case of Oscar Schindler, Richard Kearney skilfully illuminates how stories not only entertain us but can determine our (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  36.  7
    Sport, Fiction, and the Stories They Tell.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):55-71.
    The article is intended to reveal important similarities between fiction and sport. I build on Jonathan Gottschall’s discussion in The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human by celebrating the significance of stories and their ‘witchy power’ and by examining factors that demonstrate similarities between fiction and sport. I suggest that an unmistakable semantic, structural, and cultural kinship exists between the two. This argument requires a discussion of play theory, play resources and constitutive rules, the semantic power of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37.  16
    Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will. [REVIEW]John Fischer - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):196-198.
    In Our Stories, John Martin Fischer offers readers a characteristically thoughtful and engaging presentation of his views on a variety of topics, most notably death, immortality and self-expression. Having come to this collection familiar primarily with Fischer's work on freedom and responsibility, I was impressed with the range of issues treated in this latest volume. While each essay is independently appealing, perhaps the most compelling aspect of Our Stories is its cohesiveness. Fischer discerns a variety of subtle connections (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  38.  8
    Formation Stories and Causality in Sociology.Daniel Hirschman & Isaac Ariail Reed - 2014 - Sociological Theory 32 (4):259-282.
    Sociologists have long been interested in understanding the emergence of new social kinds. We argue that sociologists’ formation stories have been mischaracterized as noncausal, descriptive, or interpretive. Traditional “forcing-cause” accounts describe regularized relations between fixed entities with specific properties. The three dominant approaches to causality—variable causality, treatments and manipulations, and mechanisms—all refer to forcing causes. But formation stories do not fit the forcing-causes framework because accounts of formation violate the assumptions that ground forcing-cause accounts and instead emphasize eventfulness, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  87
    ‘If I Should Fall From Grace…’: Stories of Change and Organizational Ethics. [REVIEW]Carl Rhodes, Alison Pullen & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):535 - 551.
    Although studies in organizational storytelling have dealt extensively with the relationship between narrative, power and organizational change, little attention has been paid to the implications of this for ethics within organizations. This article addresses this by presenting an analysis of narrative and ethics as it relates to the practice of organizational downsizing. Drawing on Paul Ricoeur's theories of narrative and ethics, we analyze stories of organizational change reported by employees and managers in an organization that had undergone persistent downsizing. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  40.  33
    Disciplinary Baptisms: A Comparison of the Naming Stories of Genetics, Molecular Biology, Genomics and Systems Biology.Alexander Powell, Maureen A. O'Malley, Staffan Mueller-Wille, Jane Calvert & John Dupré - 2007 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 29 (1):5-32.
    Understanding how scientific activities use naming stories to achieve disciplinary status is important not only for insight into the past, but for evaluating current claims that new disciplines are emerging. In order to gain a historical understanding of how new disciplines develop in relation to these baptismal narratives, we compare two recently formed disciplines, systems biology and genomics, with two earlier related life sciences, genetics and molecular biology. These four disciplines span the twentieth century, a period in which the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  41.  39
    The Roles of Stories in Applying Game Theory.Till Grüne‐Yanoff & Paul Schweinzer - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (2):131-146.
    Game?theoretic models consist of a formal game structure and an informal model narrative or story. When game theory is employed to model economic situations, the stories play a central role in interpreting, constructing and solving game structures. We analyse the architecture of game theory and distinguish between game models and the theory proper. We present the different functions of the model narrative in the application of game models to economic situations. In particular, we show how model narratives support the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  16
    ‘If I Should Fall From Grace…’: Stories of Change and Organizational Ethics.Carl Rhodes, Alison Pullen & Stewart R. Clegg - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):535-551.
    Although studies in organizational storytelling have dealt extensively with the relationship between narrative, power and organizational change, little attention has been paid to the implications of this for ethics within organizations. This article addresses this by presenting an analysis of narrative and ethics as it relates to the practice of organizational downsizing. Drawing on Paul Ricoeur’s theories of narrative and ethics, we analyze stories of organizational change reported by employees and managers in an organization that had undergone persistent downsizing. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  43. Victims' Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Victim's Stories and the Advancement of Human Rights takes on a set of questions suggested by the worldwide persistence of human rights abuse and the prevalence of victims' stories in human rights campaigns, truth commissions, and international criminal tribunals: What conceptions of victims are presumed in contemporary human rights discourse? How do conventional narrative templates fail victims of human rights abuse and resist raising novel human rights issues? What is empathy, and how can victims frame their stories (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  17
    Gendered Narratives: Stories and Silences in Transitional Justice.Elisabeth Porter - 2016 - Human Rights Review 17 (1):35-50.
    Stories told about violence, trauma, and loss inform knowledge of post-conflict societies. Stories have a context which is part of the story-teller’s life narrative. Reasons for silences are varied. This article affirms the importance of telling and listening to stories and notes the significance of silences within transitional justice’s narratives. It does this in three ways. First, it outlines a critical narrative theory of transitional justice which confirms the importance of narrative agency in telling or withholding (...). Relatedly, it affirms the importance of story-telling as a way to explain differentiated gender requirements within transitional justice processes. Second, it examines gendered differences in the ways that women are silenced by shame, choose silence to retain self-respect, use silence as a strategy of survival, or an agential act. Third, it argues that compassionate listening requires gender-sensitive responses that recognize the narrator’s sense of self and needs. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45.  40
    Codes, Ethics and Cross-Cultural Differences: Stories From the Implementation of a Corporate Code of Ethics in a MNC Subsidiary.Sven Helin & Johan Sandström - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):281-291.
    In this article, we focus on the cross-cultural aspects of the implementation of an American company's code of ethics into its Swedish subsidiary. We identify the cross-cultural stories that the receivers in the subsidiary use when trying to explain the parent's code and conceptualize these stories as part of an emerging narrative of national belonging and differences. The receivers resisted the code by amplifying the importance of national identity. Rather than stimulating a discussion on ethics that might have (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  46. “Recovering Our Stories”: A Small Act of Resistance.Lucy Costa, Jijian Voronka, Danielle Landry, Jenna Reid, Becky Mcfarlane, David Reville & Kathryn Church - 2012 - Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):85-101.
    This paper describes a community event organized in response to the appropriation and overreliance on the psychiatric patient “personal story” within mental health organizations. The sharing of experiences through stories by individuals who self-identify as having “lived experience” has been central to the history of organizing for change in and outside of the psychiatric system. However, in the last decade, personal stories have increasingly been used by the psychiatric system to bolster research, education, and fundraising interests. We explore (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  26
    Higgs Models and Other Stories About Mass Generation.Michael Stöltzner - 2014 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 45 (2):369-386.
    The paper studies the topography of the model landscape of the physics in the Higgs sector both within the Standard Model of Elementary Particle Physics and beyond in the months before the discovery of a SM Higgs boson. At first glance, this landscape appears fragmented into a large number of different models and research communities. But it also clusters around certain guiding ideas, among them supersymmetry or dynamical symmetry breaking, in which representative and narrative features of the models are combined. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48.  5
    Science Is Just Another Opinion: Making Medical Stories Count Post–COVID-19.Neal Baer - 2020 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 63 (3):480-493.
    How can we as health-care providers, along with those committed to advocating for health-care equity, draw on our work to tell stories that can make a difference in people’s lives? As a pediatrician and television writer, I’m in the unique position to promote public health through dramatic television stories that are grounded in data. By telling emotionally compelling stories that are informed by peer-reviewed research, we can improve public health, particularly in these COVID-19 times, when conspiracies and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Primordial Role of Stories in Human Self-Creation.Arran Gare - 2007 - Cosmos and History 3 (1):93-114.
    We now have a paradoxical situation where the place and status of stories is in decline within the humanities, while scientists are increasingly recognizing their importance. Here the attitude towards narratives of these scientists is defended. It is argued that stories play a primordial role in human self-creation, underpinning more abstract discourses such as mathematics, logic and science. To uphold the consistency of this claim, this thesis is defended by telling a story of the evolution of European culture (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50.  12
    Teaching Care Ethics: Conceptual Understandings and Stories for Learning.Colette Rabin & Grinell Smith - 2013 - Journal of Moral Education 42 (2):164-176.
    An ethic of care acknowledges the centrality of the role of caring relationships in moral education. Care ethics requires a conception of ?care? that differs from the quotidian use of the word. In order to teach care ethics more effectively, this article discusses four interrelated ways that teachers? understandings of care differ from care ethics: (1) conflating the term of reference ?care? with its quotidian use; (2) overlooking the challenge of developing caring relationships; (3) tending toward monocultural understandings of care; (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000