Results for 'Dori Bloom'

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  1. Causation, Norm Violation, and Culpable Control.Mark Alicke, David Rose & Dori Bloom - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (12):670-696.
    Causation is one of philosophy's most venerable and thoroughly-analyzed concepts. However, the study of how ordinary people make causal judgments is a much more recent addition to the philosophical arsenal. One of the most prominent views of causal explanation, especially in the realm of harmful or potentially harmful behavior, is that unusual or counternormative events are accorded privileged status in ordinary causal explanations. This is a fundamental assumption in psychological theories of counterfactual reasoning, and has been transported to philosophy by (...)
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  2.  23
    Causal Deviance and the Ascription of Intent and Blame.Ross Rogers, Mark D. Alicke, Sarah G. Taylor, David Rose, Teresa L. Davis & Dori Bloom - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (3):404-427.
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  3.  53
    A Manifold of Spatial Maps in the Brain.Dori Derdikman & Edvard I. Moser - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (12):561-569.
  4.  99
    Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete. Plato & Allan David Bloom - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's Symposium" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The ...
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  5.  3
    Harold Bloom Responds.Harold Bloom - 2019 - Symploke 27 (1-2):351.
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  6. Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil.Paul Bloom - 2013 - Crown.
    A leading cognitive scientist argues that a deep sense of good and evil is bred in the bone. From John Locke to Sigmund Freud, philosophers and psychologists have long believed that we begin life as blank moral slates. Many of us take for granted that babies are born selfish and that it is the role of society—and especially parents—to transform them from little sociopaths into civilized beings. In Just Babies, Paul Bloom argues that humans are in fact hardwired with (...)
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  7.  12
    Interview: Harold Bloom and Robert Moynihan.Harold Bloom & Robert Moynihan - 1983 - Diacritics 13 (3):57.
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  8. Plotkin, & Bassett (2000), Bloom SS, Tsui AO, Plotkin M., Bassett S., What Husbands in Northern India Know About Reproductive Health, Correlates of Knowledge About Pregnancy and Maternal and Sexual Health. [REVIEW]Tsui Bloom - 2000 - Journal of Biosocial Science 32 (2).
     
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  9.  18
    Prolegomenon to Bloom: The Opposing VirtueYeats. [REVIEW]Sandra Siegel & Harold Bloom - 1971 - Diacritics 1 (2):35.
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  10.  90
    Empathy and Its Discontents.Paul Bloom - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (1):24-31.
  11.  66
    Neutrality, Autonomy, and Freedom of Contract.Kimel Dori - 2001 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 21 (3):473-494.
    The article examines the popular notion that liberalism, or liberal theory of contract, is committed to a particularly rigid conception of the freedom of contract. The article argues that this notion is mistaken, and seeks to identify its roots in certain misconceptions of modern liberalism and its implications, and in a certain misunderstanding concerning the nature of contract. Neutral political concern, the value of personal autonomy, and finally the belief that contracts are identical to promises in terms of their significance (...)
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  12.  14
    The Choice of Paradigm for Theory of Contract: Reflections on the Relational Model.Dori Kimel - 2007 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (2):233-255.
    The article comments on the supposed need for a paradigm for the theory of contract, primarily by way of engaging with the most prominent source of late of calls for a paradigm shift in contract theory, the relational theory of contract. The article distinguishes between an empirical, a doctrinal-prescriptive and a theoretical–analytical line of argument as offered by relational theory. With regard to the first line of argument, the article argues that the thought that contract law already is ‘relationally constituted’ (...)
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  13. Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts.Paul Bloom - 1996 - Cognition 60 (1):1-29.
  14. Response to Professor Huang Siu-Chi's Review of "Knowledge Painfully Acquired", by Lo Ch'in-Shun and Translated by Irene Bloom.Irene Bloom - 1989 - Philosophy East and West 39 (4):459-463.
  15. Two Reasons to Abandon the False Belief Task as a Test of Theory of Mind.Paul Bloom - 2000 - Cognition 77 (1):25-31.
  16. Religion is Natural.Paul Bloom - manuscript
    Despite its considerable intellectual interest and great social relevance, religion has been neglected by contemporary develop- mental psychologists. But in the last few years, there has been an emerging body of research exploring children’s grasp of certain universal religious ideas. Some recent findings suggest that two foundational aspects of religious belief – belief in divine agents, and belief in mind–body dualism – come naturally to young children. This research is briefly reviewed, and some future directions..
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  17.  14
    The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life.Harold Bloom - 2011 - Yale University Press.
    Bloom leads readers through the labyrinthine paths which link the writers and critics who have informed and inspired him for so many years.
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  18. Natural Language and Natural Selection.Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, confers (...)
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  19.  59
    Deconstruction and Criticism.Harold Bloom, Paul de Man, Jacques Derrida, Geoffrey Hartman & J. Hillis Miller - 1979 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):219-221.
  20.  56
    Young Children Are Sensitive to How an Object Was Created When Deciding What to Name It.Paul Bloom - 2000 - Cognition 76 (2):91-103.
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  21.  39
    Children Prefer Certain Individuals Over Perfect Duplicates.Paul Bloom - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):455-462.
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  22.  27
    Religious Belief as an Evolutionary Accident.Paul Bloom & Osman Zahid Çifçi - 2015 - Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):163.
  23.  75
    Causal Deviance and the Attribution of Moral Responsibility.Paul Bloom - manuscript
    Are current theories of moral responsibility missing a factor in the attribution of blame and praise? Four studies demonstrated that even when cause, intention, and outcome (factors generally assumed to be sufficient for the ascription of moral responsibility) are all present, blame and praise are discounted when the factors are not linked together in the usual manner (i.e., cases of ‘‘causal deviance’’). Experiment 4 further demonstrates that this effect of causal deviance is driven by intuitive gut feelings of right and (...)
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  24.  53
    Three- and Four-Year-Olds Spontaneously Use Others' Past Performance to Guide Their Learning.Paul Bloom - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1018-1034.
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  25.  14
    Generativity Within Language and Other Cognitive Domains.Paul Bloom - 1994 - Cognition 51 (2):177-189.
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  26.  51
    Understanding Children's and Adults' Limitations in Mental State Reasoning.Paul Bloom - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):255-260.
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  27. The Western Canon: The Books and School of the Ages.Harold Bloom - 1996 - History of the Human Sciences 9:99-99.
     
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  28. Thinking Through Language.Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  29.  28
    Natural Selection and Natural Language.Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-784.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, confers (...)
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  30.  51
    Some Theorems on Structural Consequence Operations.Stephen L. Bloom - 1975 - Studia Logica 34 (1):1 - 9.
    Two characterizations are given of those structural consequence operations on a propositional language which can be defined via proofs from a finite number of polynomial rules.
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  31.  14
    Theories of Artifact Categorization.Paul Bloom - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):87-93.
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  32.  93
    Capacities Underlying Word Learning.Paul Bloom & Lori Markson - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (2):67-73.
  33.  52
    The Ethics of Compensation Systems.Matt Bloom - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (2):149-152.
    Compensation systems are an integral part of the relationships organizations establish with their employees. For many years, researchers viewed pay systems as an efficient way to bring market-like labour exchanges inside organizations. This view suggested that only economic considerations matter for understanding how compensation systems effect organizations and their employees. Advances in organizational research, particularly those focused on issues of justice and fairness, suggest that the fully understanding the outcomes of compensation systems requires examining their psychological, social, and moral effects.
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  34.  20
    The Perceived Intentionality of Groups.Paul Bloom & Csaba Veres - 1999 - Cognition 71 (1):B1-B9.
  35.  68
    Developmental Changes in the Understanding of Generics.Paul Bloom - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):166-183.
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  36.  51
    The Linguistic Shaping of Thought: A Study in the Impact of Language on Thinking in China & the West.Alfred H. Bloom - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (1):84-94.
  37. Love and Friendship.Allan BLOOM - 1993
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  38.  6
    4. Biology and Culture in the Mencian View of Human Nature.Irene Bloom - 2017 - In Alan K. L. Chan (ed.), Mencius: Contexts and Interpretations. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 91-102.
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  39.  44
    Enumeration of Collective Entities by 5-Month-Old Infants.Paul Bloom - 2002 - Cognition 83 (3):55-62.
  40.  52
    Bloom and His Critics: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Aims of Education.Jon Fennell - 1999 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):405-434.
    The central questions raised by Allan Bloom's The Closing of theAmerican Mind are often overlooked. Among the most important ofBloom's themes is the impact of nihilism upon education. Bloom condemnsnihilism. Interestingly, we find among his critics two alternativejudgments. Richard Schacht, citing Nietzsche, asserts that nihilism,while fruitless in and of itself, is a necessary prerequisite tosomething higher. Harry Neumann, affirming the accuracy of nihilism,declares that both Bloom and Nietzsche reject nihilism out of ignoranceborn of weakness. All three philosophers (...)
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  41.  31
    Empathy, Schmempathy: Response to Zaki.Paul Bloom - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (2):60-61.
  42. Précis of How Children Learn the Meanings of Words.Paul Bloom - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1095-1103.
    Normal children learn tens of thousands of words, and do so quickly and efficiently, often in highly impoverished environments. In How Children Learn the Meanings of Words, I argue that word learning is the product of certain cognitive and linguistic abilities that include the ability to acquire concepts, an appreciation of syntactic cues to meaning, and a rich understanding of the mental states of other people. These capacities are powerful, early emerging, and to some extent uniquely human, but they are (...)
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  43. Mindreading, Communication and the Learning of Names for Things.Paul Bloom - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (1-2):37–54.
    There are two facts about word learning that everyone accepts. The first is that words really do have to be learned. There is controversy over how much conceptual structure and linguistic knowledge is innate, but nobody thinks that this is the case for the specific mappings between sounds (or signs) and meanings. This is because these mappings vary arbitrarily from culture to culture. No matter how intelligent a British baby is, for instance, she still has to learn, by attending to (...)
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  44.  61
    Mencian Arguments on Human Nature (Jen-Hsing).Irene Bloom - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (1):19-53.
  45.  27
    More Than Words: A Reply to Malt and Sloman.Paul Bloom - 2007 - Cognition 105 (3):649-655.
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  46. Psychological Essentialism in Selecting the 14th Dalai Lama.Paul Bloom - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (7):243.
  47.  15
    Syntactic Cues in the Acquisition of Collective Nouns.Paul Bloom & Deborah Kelemen - 1995 - Cognition 56 (1):1-30.
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  48.  33
    Nothing Personal: What Psychologists Get Wrong About Identity.Christina Starmans & Paul Bloom - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (7):566-568.
  49.  28
    How Specific is the Shape Bias?Paul Bloom - manuscript
    Children tend to extend object names on the basis of sameness of shape, rather than size, color, or materialFa tendency that has been dubbed the ‘‘shape bias.’’ Is the shape bias the result of well-learned associations between words and objects? Or does it exist because of a general belief that shape is a good indicator of object category membership? The present three studies addressed this debate by exploring whether the shape bias is specific to naming. In Study 1, 3-year-olds showed (...)
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  50. Human Nature and Biological Nature in Mencius.Irene Bloom - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47 (1):21-32.
    Ren-xing can be aptly translated as "human nature," representing as it does the Mencian conviction of and sympathy for a common humanity. The enterprise of comparative philosophy is furthered by drawing attention to the large and important conceptual sphere within which Mencius was working, to his concern for the most fundamental realities of human life, and to his translatability across time and cultures.
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