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  1.  1
    Between Ethics and Aesthetics: Crossing the Boundaries.Dorota Glowacka & Stephen Boos (eds.) - 2002 - State University of New York Press.
    Rethinks the existing definitions of aesthetics and ethics and the relations between them.
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  2. Forgive Me for Forgiving You : Derrida, Levinas, and Polish Aporias of Forgiveness.Dorota Glowacka - 2010 - In Henk Oosterling & Ewa Płonowska Ziarek (eds.), Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.
  3. Negative Witnessing and the Perplexities of Forgiveness : Polish Jewish Contexts After the Shoah.Dorota Glowacka - 2009 - In Desmond Manderson (ed.), Essays on Levinas and Law: A Mosaic. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  4. Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics.Hugh J. Silverman, Louise Burchill, Jean-Luc Nancy, Laurens ten Kate, Luce Irigaray, Elaine P. Miller, George Smith, Peter Schwenger, Bernadette Wegenstein, Rosi Braidotti, Rosalyn Diprose, Dorota Glowacka, Heinz Kimmerle, Purushottama Bilimoria, Sally Percival Wood & Slavoj Z.¡ iz¡ek - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    As an alternative to universalism and particularism, Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics proposes "intermedialities" as a new model of social relations and intercultural dialogue. The concept of "intermedialities" stresses the necessity of situating debates concerning social relations in the divergent contexts of new media and avant-garde artistic practices as well as feminist, political, and philosophical analyses.
     
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  5.  35
    The Trace of the Untranslatable: Emmanuel Levinas and the Ethics of Translation.Dorota Glowacka - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (1):1-29.
    Looking at Holocaust testimonies, which in her view always involve some form of translation, the author seeks to develop an ethics of translation in the context of Levinas’ hyperbolic ethics of responsibility. Calling on Benjamin and Derrida to make explicit the precipitous task of the translator, she argues that the translator faces an ethical call or assignation that resembles the fundamental structure of Levinasian subjectivity. The author relates the paradoxes of translation in Holocaust testimony to Levinas’ silence on the problem (...)
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