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Dorothy L. Cheney [11]Dorothy Cheney [4]
  1.  77
    How Monkeys See the World: Inside the Mind of Another Species.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    "This reviewer had to be restrained from stopping people in the street to urge them to read it: They would learn something of the way science is done,...
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  2.  56
    Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting.Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller - 2005 - Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  3.  12
    Précis of How Monkeys See the World.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):135-147.
  4.  42
    Primate Social Cognition and the Origins of Language.Robert M. Seyfarth, Dorothy L. Cheney & Thore J. Bergman - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (6):264-266.
  5.  29
    Suricate Alarm Calls Signal Predator Class and Urgency.Marta B. Manser, Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (2):55-57.
  6.  39
    Primate Social Knowledge and the Origins of Language.Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney - 2008 - Mind and Society 7 (1):129-142.
    Primate vocal communication is very different from human language. Differences are most pronounced in call production. Differences in production have been overemphasized, however, and distracted attention from the information that primates acquire when they hear vocalizations. In perception and cognition, continuities with language are more apparent. We suggest that natural selection has favored nonhuman primates who, upon hearing vocalizations, form mental representations of other individuals, their relationships, and their motives. This social knowledge constitutes a discrete, combinatorial system that shares several (...)
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  7.  16
    Grooming is Not the Only Regulator of Primate Social Interactions.Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):717-718.
  8.  11
    The Representation of Social Relations by Monkeys.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1990 - Cognition 37 (1-2):167-196.
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  9.  11
    Inside the Mind of a Monkey.Robert Seyfarth & Dorothy Cheney - 1996 - In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 337--343.
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  10. Characterizing Early Maternal Style in a Population of Guide Dogs.Emily E. Bray, Mary D. Sammel, Dorothy L. Cheney, James A. Serpell & Robert M. Seyfarth - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  11.  13
    Another “Just So” Story: How the Leopardguarders Spot.Dorothy Cheney & Robert Seyfarth - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):506.
  12.  12
    Characterizing the Mind of Another Species.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):172-182.
  13.  15
    Mirrors and the Attribution of Mental States.Dorothy Cheney & Robert Seyfarth - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):574-577.
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  14.  20
    The Shared Evolutionary History of Kinship Classifications and Language.Robert M. Seyfarth & Dorothy L. Cheney - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (5):402-403.
    Among monkeys and apes, both the recognition and classification of individuals and the recognition and classification of vocalizations constitute discrete combinatorial systems. One system maps onto the other, suggesting that during human evolution kinship classifications and language shared a common cognitive precursor.
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