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  1.  20
    Greek Metaphors of Light.Dorothy Tarrant - 1960 - Classical Quarterly 10 (3-4):181-.
    Sight, and its object light, appear to be universal metaphors in human language, both for intellectual apprehension or activity and its objects and also for the experience of aesthetic and moral values. The figure is applied equally to the course or end of a rational approach to knowledge, giving scarcely-felt imagery like ‘I see’, ‘look into’, etc., or to a pictorially described ‘illumination’ or ‘vision’ that lies beyond the range of reason. Some phrases are applicable in both senses; to ‘see (...)
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  2.  42
    Imagery in Plato's Republic.Dorothy Tarrant - 1946 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1-2):27-.
    Of all the dialogues that may be said to be in Plato's normal style, the Republic seems to be the richest in imagery. The Phaedrus may contain more of such figurative language, but its whole atmosphere and style are so artificial as to place it outside comparison. The Republic stands, in this respect as in philosophic content, between the relative plainness of the earlier works and the didactic heaviness of the Laws, which is relieved by proverbial, rather than by imaginative, (...)
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  3.  13
    Plato as Dramatist.Dorothy Tarrant - 1955 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:82-89.
  4.  15
    The Touch of Socrates.Dorothy Tarrant - 1958 - Classical Quarterly 8 (1-2):95-.
    At the end of the dialogue Theages, after a general review of the prophetic power given by Socrates quotes the words of Aristides to himself—130 d—e: The extravagant claim here made for the influence of Socrates as conveyed through physical proximity and contact is one of the chief reasons for regarding the dialogue as spurious, giving as it does a later and a distorted development from suggestions made by Plato and Xenophon themselves.
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  5.  10
    Plato's Use of Quotations and Other Illustrative Material.Dorothy Tarrant - 1951 - Classical Quarterly 1 (1-2):59-.
    Plato's use of illustrative material, in the widest sense, is very varied. Parts of the field have had some study—his use of metaphor and simile and his use of proverbs, at least as regards subject-matter and sources. The object of the present article is to consider in general what may already have been catalogued somewhere—his quotations from other writers and his references to myths and to other stories.
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  6.  6
    The Pseudo-Platonic Socrates.Dorothy Tarrant - 1938 - Classical Quarterly 32 (3-4):167-.
  7.  16
    Style and Thought in Pláto's Dialogues.Dorothy Tarrant - 1948 - Classical Quarterly 42 (1-2):28-.
    The study of Plato's style as a writer has hardly kept pace with the study of his thought as a philosopher. Obviously he stands apart as the one original thinker in classical antiquity who also gives expression to his thought in a finished literary prose; and obviously his prose is worth studying for its own sake. What I would here suggest is that the close and continual relationship between the style and the content of his work may serve, in various (...)
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  8.  8
    Πινδάρου Ἐπινίκια: Pindar's Odes of VictoryMeisterwerke der Türkischen Museen zu Konstantinopel: Band IÜber Stilleben aus Pompeji und HerculaneumThe Hippias Major Attributed to PlatoPindarou Epinikia: Pindar's Odes of VictoryMeisterwerke der Turkischen Museen zu Konstantinopel: Band IUber Stilleben aus Pompeji und Herculaneum.R. M. R., C. J. Billson, Martin Schede, H. G. Beyen & Dorothy Tarrant - 1929 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 49:136.
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  9. Greek Philosophy Before Plato.Robert Scoon, R. C. Lodge & Dorothy Tarrant - 1929 - Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (13):117-120.
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  10.  16
    Aristophanes, Birds 700.Dorothy Tarrant - 1923 - The Classical Review 37 (5-6):113-.
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  11.  15
    Catullus LXXII. 3, 4.Dorothy Tarrant - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (1-2):19-.
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  12.  26
    Colloquialisms, Semi-Proverbs, and Word-Play in Plato.Dorothy Tarrant - 1946 - Classical Quarterly 40 (3-4):109-.
    The basis of Plato's style being for the most part informal conversation, certain elements natural and appropriate to this atmosphere may be looked for and found. These include: colloquialisms in the accepted sense—short phrases, or special uses of words, associated with informal or comic style; phrases of poetic type, probably quotations or adaptations, used frequently with burlesque effect; proverbial or semi-proverbial matter; word-play of various types. The above groups overlap at certain points, but the classification may serve fairly well to (...)
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  13.  8
    More Colloquialisms, Semi-Proverbs, and Word-Play in Plato.Dorothy Tarrant - 1958 - Classical Quarterly 8 (3-4):158-.
    THE following further instances and parallels, and additional usages, may supplement the colloquialisms, &c, in Plato's dialogues which were listed and studied in a former article. 1. Colloquialisms More examples and parallels for usages previously noted: Charm. 154 b 4, Crat. 418 b 8, Phaedo 92 d 4, Parm. 126 c 6, 127 b 1, Polit. 290 d 7, Laws 630 b 7.
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  14.  31
    Metaphors of Death in the Phaedo.Dorothy Tarrant - 1952 - The Classical Review 2 (02):64-66.
  15.  18
    Plato, Phaedo 115 D.Dorothy Tarrant - 1949 - The Classical Review 63 (02):44-45.
  16.  5
    Plato, Phaedo 74 A–B.Dorothy Tarrant - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (1):124-126.
  17.  14
    Plato's Use of Extended Oratio Obliqua.Dorothy Tarrant - 1955 - Classical Quarterly 5 (3-4):222-.
    There are in Plato's dialogues several examples of long-continued oblique narration, which may repay study in relation both to his syntactical usages and to the development of his literary style. Two dialogues are based upon this construction. In the Symposium the whole framework, after a brief dramatic introduction , is in reported form; the Parmenides, after a shorter narrative introduction , sustains 0.0. up to 137 c, continuing as a dramatic interchange of speeches without covering construction.
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  18.  17
    The Art of Plato.Dorothy Tarrant - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (03):104-112.
  19. The Contribution of Plato to Free Religious Thought.Dorothy Tarrant - 1949 - London: Lindsey Press.
     
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