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Doug Hardman [12]Douglas Hardman [1]
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Doug Hardman
Bournemouth University
  1.  12
    Where the ethical action is.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (1):45–48.
    It is common to think of medical and ethical modes of thought as different in kind. In such terms, some clinical situations are made more complicated by an additional ethical component. Against this picture, we propose that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind, but merely different aspects of what it means to be human. We further propose that clinicians are uniquely positioned to synthesise these two aspects without prior knowledge of philosophical ethics.
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  2.  31
    Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Philosophical Investigations 45 (4):453-470.
    In this paper, we explicate the method of Investigative Ordinary Language Philosophy (IOLP). The term was coined by John Cook to describe the unique philosophical approach of Frank Ebersole. We argue that (i) IOLP is an overlooked yet valuable philosophical method grounded in our everyday experiences and concerns; and (ii) as such, Frank Ebersole is an important but neglected figure in the history of ordinary language philosophy.
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  3.  16
    Pretending to care.Doug Hardman - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):506-509.
    On one hand, it is commonly accepted that clinicians should not deceive their patients, yet on the other there are many instances in which deception could be in a patient’s best interest. In this paper, I propose that this conflict is in part driven by a narrow conception of deception as contingent on belief. I argue that we cannot equate non-deceptive care solely with introducing or sustaining a patient’s true belief about their condition or treatment, because there are many instances (...)
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  4. Why the extended mind is nothing special but is central.Giulio Ongaro, Doug Hardman & Ivan Deschenaux - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-23.
    The extended mind thesis states that the mind is not brain-bound but extends into the physical world. The philosophical debate around the thesis has mostly focused on extension towards epistemic artefacts, treating the phenomenon as a special capacity of the human organism to recruit external physical resources to solve individual tasks. This paper argues that if the mind extends to artefacts in the pursuit of individual tasks, it extends to other humans in the pursuit of collective tasks. Mind extension to (...)
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  5.  46
    Manufacturing the placebo effect.Doug Hardman - 2022 - Philosophical Investigations 45 (4):414-429.
    Philosophical Investigations, Volume 45, Issue 4, Page 414-429, October 2022.
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  6.  20
    A Fictionalist Account of Open-Label Placebo.Doug Hardman - 2024 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 49 (3):246-256.
    The placebo effect is now generally defined widely as an individual’s response to the psychosocial context of a clinical treatment, as distinct from the treatment’s characteristic physiological effects. Some researchers, however, argue that such a wide definition leads to confusion and misleading implications. In response, they propose a narrow definition restricted to the therapeutic effects of deliberate placebo treatments. Within the framework of modern medicine, such a scope currently leaves one viable placebo treatment paradigm: the non-deceptive and non-concealed administration of (...)
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  7.  5
    Bioethics to the rescue! A response to Emmerich.Douglas Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (11):887-887.
    In our article,Where the ethical action is,we argue that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind but merely different aspects of a clinical situation. In response, Emmerich argues that in so doing, we neglect several important features of healthcare and medical education. Although we applaud the spirit of Emmerich’s response, we argue that his critique is an attempt at a general defence of the value of bioethical expertise in clinical practice, rather than a specific critique of (...)
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  8.  11
    Three Simple Rules for Good Cognitive Science.Doug Hardman - 2022 - Cognitive Science 46 (7):e13172.
    Cognitive Science, Volume 46, Issue 7, July 2022.
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  9.  20
    On having control over our actions.Doug Hardman - 2024 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (2):165-177.
    In this essay, I investigate the longstanding philosophical problem of whether we have control over our actions in a deterministic world. In working through a range of everyday situations in which this problem could arise, I come to the realisation that determinism has no bearing on whether we have control over our actions, because having control over our actions and determinism only make sense under different aspects.
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  10.  8
    Searching in an unfamiliar environment: a phenomenologically informed experiment.Madeleine Alcock, Jan M. Wiener & Doug Hardman - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-21.
    Wayfinding is generally understood as the process of purposefully navigating to distant and non-visible destinations. Within this broad framework, uninformed searching entails finding one’s way to a target destination, in an unfamiliar environment, with no knowledge of its location. Although a variety of search strategies have been previously reported, this research was largely conducted in the laboratory or virtual environments using simplistic and often non-realistic situations, raising questions about its ecological validity. In this study, we explored how extant findings on (...)
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  11.  8
    Return of the evil genius.Doug Hardman - 2023 - Philosophical Investigations 47 (1):24-31.
    In this essay, I consider whether it makes sense to say that our cognitive capacities—remembering, imagining, intending, hoping, expecting and so on—manifest as inner, subpersonal processes. Given whether something makes sense is a grammatical rather than theoretical or empirical issue, it cannot be explained but can only be better understood by describing and reflecting on situations in which it arises. As such, I approach this issue using the descriptive method of O.K. Bouwsma, which is a development of Wittgenstein's latter methodological (...)
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  12.  13
    Unintentional deception still deceives.Doug Hardman - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (7):513-514.
    In my recent article,Pretending to care, I argue that a better understanding of non-doxastic attitudes could improve our understanding of deception in clinical practice. In an insightful and well-argued response, Colgrove highlights three problems with my account. For the sake of brevity, in this reply I focus on the first: that my definition of deception is implausible because it does not involve intention. Although I concede that my initial broad definition needs modification, I argue that it should not be modified (...)
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  13.  7
    Whose models? Which representations? A response to Wagner.Doug Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (12):850-851.
    InWhere the Ethical Action Is,we argued that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind but different aspects of a situation. One of the consequences of this argument is that the requirement for or benefits of normative moral theorising in bioethics is undercut. In response, Wagner has argued that normative moral theories should be reconceived as models. Wagner’s argument seems to be that once reconceived as models, the rationale for moral theorising, undercut by our arguments inWhere the (...)
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