35 found
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  1.  9
    From Science Studies to Scientific Literacy: A View From the Classroom.Douglas Allchin - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (9):1911-1932.
  2.  9
    The Minnesota Case Study Collection: New Historical Inquiry Case Studies for Nature of Science Education.Douglas Allchin - 2012 - Science & Education 21 (9):1263-1281.
  3.  4
    Pseudohistory and Pseudoscience.Douglas Allchin - 2004 - Science and Education: Academic Journal of Ushynsky University 13 (3):179-195.
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  4.  21
    Scientific Myth‐Conceptions.Douglas Allchin - 2003 - Science Education 87 (3):329-351.
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  5.  67
    To Err and Win a Nobel Prize: Paul Boyer, ATP Synthase and the Emergence of Bioenergetics. [REVIEW]Douglas Allchin - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (1):149 - 172.
    Paul Boyer shared a Nobel Prize in 1997 for his work on the mechanism of ATP synthase. His earlier work, though (which contributed indirectly to his triumph), included major errors, both experimental and theoretical. Two benchmark cases offer insight into how scientists err and how they deal with error. Boyer's work also parallels and illustrates the emergence of bioenergetics in the second half of the twentieth century, rivaling achievements in evolution and molecular biology.
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  6.  51
    Error Types.Douglas Allchin - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (1):38-58.
    : Errors in science range along a spectrum from those relatively local to the phenomenon (usually easily remedied in the laboratory) to those more conceptually derived (involving theory or cultural factors, sometimes quite long-term). One may classify error types broadly as material, observational, conceptual or discoursive. This framework bridges philosophical and sociological perspectives, offering a basis for interfield discourse. A repertoire of error types also supports error analytics, a program for deepening reliability through strategies for regulating and probing error.
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  7.  27
    Rekindling Phlogiston: From Classroom Case Study to Interdisciplinary Relationships.Douglas Allchin - 1997 - Science & Education 6 (5):473-509.
  8.  54
    The Super Bowl and the Ox-Phos Controversy: "Winner-Take-All" Competition in Philosophy of Science.Douglas Allchin - 1994 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:22 - 33.
    Several diagrams and tables from review articles during the Ox-Phos Controversy serve as an occasion to assess the nature of competition in models of theory choice in science. Many models follow "Super-Bowl" principles of polar, either-or, winner-take-all competition. A significant alternative highlighted by this episode, however, is the differentiation of domains. Incommensurability and the partial divergence of overlapping domains serve both as signals and context for shifting frameworks of competition. Appropriate strategies may thus help researchers diagnose the status of competition (...)
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  9.  21
    Why Respect for History – and Historical Error – Matters.Douglas Allchin - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (1):91-111.
  10.  34
    Cellular and Theoretical Chimeras: Piecing Together How Cells Process Energy.Douglas Allchin - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (1):31-41.
  11. The Evolution of Morality.Douglas Allchin - 2009 - Evolution 2 (4):590-601.
    Here, in textbook style, is a concise biological account of the evolution of morality. It addresses morality on three levels: moral outcomes (behavioral genetics), moral motivation or intent (psychology and neurology), and moral systems (sociality). The rationale for teaching this material is addressed in Allchin (2009). Classroom resources (including accompanying images and video links) and a discussion of teaching strategies are provided online at: http://EvolutionOfMorality.net.
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  12.  11
    Lawson’s Shoehorn, Reprise.Douglas Allchin - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (1):113-120.
  13.  28
    History of Science-with Labs.Douglas Allchin, Elizabeth Anthony, Jack Bristol, Alan Dean, David Hall & Carl Lieb - 1999 - Science & Education 8 (6):619-632.
    We describe here an interdisciplinary lab science course for non-majors using the history of science as a curricular guide. Our experience with diverse instructors underscores the importance of the teachers and classroom dynamics, beyond the curriculum. Moreover, the institutional political context is central: are courses for non-majors valued and is support given to instructors to innovate? Two sample projects are profiled.
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  14.  26
    Lawson's Shoehorn, or Should the Philosophy of Science Be Rated 'X'?Douglas Allchin - 2003 - Science & Education 12 (3):315-329.
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  15. VALUES IN SCIENCE: An Introduction.Douglas Allchin - unknown
    Values intersect with science in three primary ways. First, there are values, particularly epistemic values, which guide scientific research itself. Second, the scientific enterprise is always embedded in some particular culture and values enter science through its individual practitioners, whether consciously or not. Finally, values emerge from science, both as a product and process, and may be redistributed more broadly in the culture or society. Also, scientific discoveries may pose new social challenges about values, though the values themselves may be (...)
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  16.  55
    The Dilemma of Dominance.Douglas Allchin - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):427-451.
    The concept of dominance poses several dilemmas. First, while entrenched in genetics education, the metaphor of dominance promotes several misconceptions and misleading cultural perspectives. Second, the metaphors of power, prevalence and competition extend into science, shaping assumptions and default concepts. Third, because genetic causality is complex, the simplified concepts of dominance found in practice are highly contingent or inconsistent. The conceptual problems are illustrated in the history of studies on the evolution of dominance. Conceptual clarity may be fostered, I claim, (...)
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  17.  54
    Pseudohistory and Pseudoscience.Douglas Allchin - 2004 - Science & Education 13 (3):179-195.
  18.  16
    Do We See Through a Social Microscope?: Credibility as a Vicarious Selector.Douglas Allchin - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):298.
    Credibility in a scientific community (sensu Shapin) is a vicarious selector (sensu Campbell) for the reliability of reports by individual scientists or institutions. Similarly, images from a microscope (sensu Hacking) are vicarious selectors for studying specimens. Working at different levels, the process of indirect reasoning and checking indicates a unity to experimentalist and sociological perspectives, along with a resonance of strategies for assessing reliability. The perspective sketched here can open dialogue between philosophical and sociological interpretations of science and resolves at (...)
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  19.  66
    Points East and West: Acupuncture and Comparative Philosophy of Science.Douglas Allchin - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):115.
    Acupuncture, the traditional Chinese practice of needling to alleviate pain, offers a striking case where scientific accounts in two cultures, East and West, diverge sharply. Yet the Chinese comfortably embrace the apparent ontological incommensurability. Their pragmatic posture resonates with the New Experimentalism in the West--but with some provocative differences. The development of acupuncture in China (and not in the West) further suggests general research strategies in the context of discovery. My analysis also exemplifies how one might fruitfully pursue a comparative (...)
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  20.  12
    How Do You Falsify a Question?: Crucial Tests Versus Crucial Demonstrations.Douglas Allchin - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:74 - 88.
    I highlight a category of experiment-what I am calling 'demonstrations'-that differs in justificatory mode and argumentative role from the more familiar 'crucial tests'. 'Tests' are constructed such that alternative results are equally and symmetrically informative; they help discriminate between alternative solutions within a problem-field, where questions are shared. 'Demonstrations' are notably asymmetrical (for example, "failures" are often not telling), yet they are effective, if not "crucial," in interparadigm dispute, to legitimate questions themselves. The Ox-Phos Controversy in bioenergetics serves as an (...)
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  21.  33
    Should the Sociology of Science Be Rated X?Douglas Allchin - 2004 - Science Education 88 (6):934-946.
  22.  9
    Discovering Cell Mechanisms: The Creation of Modern Cell Biology. [REVIEW]Douglas Allchin - 2007 - Isis 98:208-209.
  23.  20
    James Hutton and Phlogiston.Douglas Allchin - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (6):615-635.
    James Hutton defended the doctrine of phlogiston in two lengthy dissertations 1792 and 1794. Empirical, biographical and disciplinary contexts jointly explain his position. Observationally, Hutton based his argument on facts about heat, light and the storage of energy, explicitly contrasting them to concerns about weight relationships. Hutton's intellectual development shows how he found these particular problems centrally relevant, and focusing on phlogiston indicates how his better known geology fits into more fundamental thinking about the natural economy. The resonance of Hutton's (...)
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  24.  35
    Thinking About Technology and the Technology of "Thinking About".Douglas Allchin - 2000 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (1):5-11.
  25.  27
    Thinking About Technology and the Technology Of.Douglas Allchin - 2000 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (1):5-11.
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  26.  5
    Points East and West: Acupuncture and Comparative Philosophy of Science.Douglas Allchin - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (5):S107-S115.
    Acupuncture, the traditional Chinese practice of needling to alleviate pain, offers a striking case where scientific accounts in two cultures, East and West, diverge sharply. Yet the Chinese comfortably embrace the apparent ontological incommensurability. Their pragmatic posture resonates with the New Experimentalism in the West--but with some provocative differences. The development of acupuncture in China further suggests general research strategies in the context of discovery. My analysis also exemplifies how one might fruitfully pursue a comparative philosophy of science that explores (...)
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  27.  35
    Taking Scientific Error and Uncertainty Seriously: Giora Hon, Jutta Schickore and Friederich Steinle : Going Amiss in Experimental Research. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 267. Dordrecht: Springer, 2009, 277pp, €120, ₤108, $189 HB.Douglas Allchin - 2012 - Metascience 21 (3):715-718.
    Taking scientific error and uncertainty seriously Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9628-z Authors Douglas Allchin, Minnesota Center for the Philosophy of Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  28.  14
    The Naturalizing Error.Douglas Allchin & Alexander J. Werth - 2017 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 48 (1):3-18.
    We describe an error type that we call the naturalizing error: an appeal to nature as a self-justified description dictating or limiting our choices in moral, economic, political, and other social contexts. Normative cultural perspectives may be subtly and subconsciously inscribed into purportedly objective descriptions of nature, often with the apparent warrant and authority of science, yet not be fully warranted by a systematic or complete consideration of the evidence. Cognitive processes may contribute further to a failure to notice the (...)
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  29. Teaching the Evolution of Morality: Status and Resources.Douglas Allchin - 2009 - Evolution 2 (4):629-635.
    Recent studies now provide a relatively robust explanation of how moral behavior evolved, perhaps not just in humans. An analysis of current biology textbooks shows that they fail to address this critical topic fully. Here, I survey resources—books, images, and videos—that can guide educators in meeting the challenge of teaching the biology of morality.
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  30.  9
    William Bechtel. Discovering Cell Mechanisms: The Creation of Modern Cell Biology. Xii + 323 Pp., Figs., App., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2006. $75. [REVIEW]Douglas Allchin - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):208-209.
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  31.  15
    Paradigms, Populations and Problem-Fields: Approaches to Disagreement.Douglas Allchin - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:53 - 66.
    Kuhn's distinction of within- and between-paradigm thinking can be extended using his notion of a problem-field. Hull's notion of populational variation applies within paradigms; his type specimen approach allows one to analyze disagreement and identify the problem-field. Categories of questions or problem frames can also partition debate, establishing interparadigm variation. A case where multiple simultaneous paradigms compete highlights the role of empirical domains. The Ox-Phos Controversy in bioenergetics (1961-1977) serves as a case study. Conclusions are framed as strategies for scientists.
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  32.  3
    Science Gone to Seed?Douglas Allchin - 1999 - Science & Education 8 (1):63-66.
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  33.  1
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Douglas Allchin - 1995 - Science & Education 4 (2):189-193.
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  34. Context-Dependent Anomalies and Strategies for Resolving Disagreement.Douglas Allchin - 2015 - In Hanne Andersen, Nancy J. Nersessian & Susann Wagenknecht (eds.), Empirical Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag.
     
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  35. Sociobiology Sex and Science.Harmon R. Holcomb Iii & Douglas Allchin - 1997 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (3):423.
    This book examines sociobiology’s validity and significance, using the sociobiological theory of the evolution of mating and parenting as an example. It identifies and discusses the array of factors that determine sociobiology’s effort to become a science, providing a rare, balanced account—more critical than that of its advocates and more constructive than that of its critics. It sees a role for sociobiology in changing the way we understand the goals of evolutionary biology, the proper way to evaluate emerging sciences, and (...)
     
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