Results for 'Douglas C. Frechtling'

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  1.  52
    On the Ethics of Management Research: An Exploratory Investigation. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Frechtling & Soyoung Boo - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):149-160.
    While there is an abundant academic literature on professional codes of ethics, there appears to be few devoted to assessing the compliance of management research with such codes. This article presents the results of applying the World Association for Public Opinion Research (WAPOR) Code of Professional Ethics and Practices to research articles based on probability sample surveys in the top three academic journals covering tourism, hospitality, and related fields. Four research questions are posed to focus application of the WAPOR Code (...)
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  2.  52
    Sensory Modalities and Novel Features of Perceptual Experiences.Douglas C. Wadle - 2021 - Synthese 198 (10):9841-9872.
    Is the flavor of mint reducible to the minty smell, the taste, and the menthol-like coolness on the roof of one’s mouth, or does it include something over and above these—something not properly associated with any one of the contributing senses? More generally, are there features of perceptual experiences—so-called novel features—that are not associated with any of our senses taken singly? This question has received a lot of attention of late. Yet surprisingly little attention has been paid to the question (...)
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  3.  9
    Hume. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1982 - Noûs 16 (3):474-477.
  4.  10
    The Metaphysics of Mind. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):959-961.
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  5.  2
    Conscience and Other Virtues: From Bonaventure to Macintyre.Douglas C. Langston - 2001 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Conscience, once a core concept for ethics, has mostly disappeared from modern moral theory. In this book Douglas Langston traces its intellectual history to account for its neglect while arguing for its still vital importance, if correctly understood. In medieval times, Langston shows in Part I, the notions of "conscientia" and "synderesis" from which our contemporary concept of conscience derives were closely connected to Greek ideas about the virtues and practical reason, although in Christianized form. As modified by Luther, (...)
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  6. Particulars and Their Qualities.Douglas C. Long - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (72):193-206.
    Berkeley, Hume, and Russell rejected the traditional analysis of substances in terms of qualities which are supported by an "unknowable substratum." To them the proper alternative seemed obvious. Eliminate the substratum in which qualities are alleged to inhere, leaving a bundle of coexisting qualities--a view that we may call the Bundle Theory or BT. But by rejecting only part of the traditional substratum theory instead of replacing it entirely, Bundle Theories perpetuate certain confusions which are found in the Substratum Doctrine. (...)
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  7. The Self-Defeating Character of Skepticism.Douglas C. Long - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):67-84.
    An important source of doubt about our knowledge of the "external world" is the thought that all of our sensory experience could be delusive without our realizing it. Such wholesale questioning of the deliverances of all forms of perception seems to leave no resources for successfully justifying our belief in the existence of an objective world beyond our subjective experiences. I argue that there is there is a fatal flaw in the very expression of philosophical doubt about the "external world." (...)
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  8.  3
    Conscience and Other Virtues: From Bonaventure to Macintyre.Douglas C. Langston - 2000 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    In this book Douglas Langston traces its intellectual history to account for its neglect while arguing for its still vital importance, if correctly understood.
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  9. Descartes' Argument for Mind-Body Dualism.Douglas C. Long - 1969 - Philosophical Forum 1 (3):259-273.
    In his Meditations Descartes concludes that he is a res cogitans, an unextended entity whose essence is to be conscious. His reasoning in support of the conclusion that he exists entirely distinct from his body has seemed unconvincing to his critics. I attempt to show that the reasoning which he offers in support of his conclusion. although mistaken, is more plausible and his mistakes more interesting than his critics have acknowledged.
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  10.  18
    The Self-Defeating Character of Skepticism.Douglas C. Long - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):67-84.
    The Self-Defeating Character of Skepticism [ABSTRACT] Douglas C. Long Philosophical skepticism arises from a Cartesian first-person perspective that initially rejects as unjustified any appeal to sense perception. I argue that, contrary to the cogito argument, when a “purely subjective” epistemology cuts one off from justified beliefs about the world in this way, it undermines justified belief about one’s own existence as an individual in the world as well. Therefore, philosophical doubt expressed in the form: “I know that I exist (...)
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  11. The Philosophical Concept of a Human Body.Douglas C. Long - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (July):321-337.
    I argue in this paper that philosophers have not clearly introduced the concept of a body in terms of which the problem of other minds and its solutions have been traditionally stated; that one can raise fatal objections to attempts to introduce this concept; and that the particular form of the problem of other minds which is stated in terms of the concept is confused and requires no solution. The concept of a "body" which may or may not be the (...)
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  12. Particulars and Their Qualities.Douglas C. Long - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (72).
    The traditional analysis of substances in terms of qualities which are supported by a "substratum" was rejected by conscientious empiricists like Berkeley, Hume and Russell on the grounds that only qualities, not the substratum, could be experienced. To these philosophers the proper alternative seemed obvious. One simply eliminates the "unknowable" element in which qualities are alleged to inhere. In Russell's words, "What would commonly be called a 'thing' is nothing but a bundle of coexisting qualities such as redness, hardness, etc."' (...)
     
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  13.  11
    Particulars and Their Qualities.Douglas C. Long - 1979 - In Michael Loux (ed.), Universals and Particulars: Readings in Ontology. Doubleday. pp. 264-84.
    See Abstract under this title of the journal article below.
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  14. Avowals and First-Person Privilege.Dorit Bar-on & Douglas C. Long - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):311-35.
    When people avow their present feelings, sensations, thoughts, etc., they enjoy what may be called “first-person privilege.” If I now said: “I have a headache,” or “I’m thinking about Venice,” I would be taken at my word: I would normally not be challenged. According to one prominent approach, this privilege is due to a special epistemic access we have to our own present states of mind. On an alternative, deflationary approach the privilege merely reflects a socio-linguistic convention governing avowals. We (...)
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  15.  83
    Avowals and First-Person Privilege.Dorit Bar-on & Douglas C. Long - 2001 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (2):311-335.
    When people avow their present feelings, sensations, thoughts, etc., they enjoy what may be called "first-person privilege." If I now said: "I have a headache," or "I'm thinking about Venice," I would be taken at my word: I would normally not be challenged. According to one prominent approach, this privilege is due to a special epistemic access we have to our own present states of mind. On an alternative, deflationary approach the privilege merely reflects a socio-linguistic convention governing avowals. We (...)
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  16. The Bodies of Persons.Douglas C. Long - 1974 - Journal of Philosophy 71 (10):291-301.
    Much mischief concerning the concept of a human body is generated by the failure of philosophers to distinguish various important senses of the term 'body.' I discuss three of those senses and illustrate the issues they can generate by discussing the concept of a Lockean exchange of bodies as well as the brain-body switch.
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  17.  17
    Scotus and Ockham on the Univocal Concept of Being.Douglas C. Langston - 1979 - Franciscan Studies 39 (1):105-129.
  18. Disembodied Existence, Physicalism and the Mind-Body Problem.Douglas C. Long - 1977 - Philosophical Studies 31 (May):307-316.
    The idea that we may continue to exist in a bodiless condition after our death has long played an important role in beliefs about immortality, ultimate rewards and punishments, the transmigration of souls, and the like. There has also been long and heated disagreement about whether the idea of disembodied existence even makes sense, let alone whether anybody can or does survive dissolution of his material form. It may seem doubtful that anything new could be added to the debate at (...)
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  19.  11
    Empirical Research on Informed Consent: An Annotated Bibliography.Jeremy Sugarman, Douglas C. McCrory, Donald Powell, Alex Krasny, Betsy Adams, Eric Ball & Cynthia Cassell - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (1):1-42.
  20. Why Machines Can Neither Think nor Feel.Douglas C. Long - 1994 - In Dale W. Jamieson (ed.), Language, Mind and Art. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Over three decades ago, in a brief but provocative essay, Paul Ziff argued for the thesis that robots cannot have feelings because they are "mechanisms, not organisms, not living creatures. There could be a broken-down robot but not a dead one. Only living creatures can literally have feelings."[i] Since machines are not living things they cannot have feelings. In the first half of my paper I review Ziff's arguments against the idea that robots could be conscious, especially his appeal to (...)
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  21. Immediacy and Mediation in Aquinas: In I Sent., Q. 1, A. 5.Douglas C. Hall - 1989 - The Thomist 53 (1):31-55.
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  22.  8
    A Note Reconsidering the Message of Heraclius’ Silver Hexagram, Circa AD 615.Douglas C. Whalin - 2019 - Byzantinische Zeitschrift 112 (1):221-232.
    The hexagram was first minted during the darkest days of the final Roman-Persian War when Roman fortunes were at their lowest. As a result, commentators have read the coin’s novel inscription, Deus Adiuta Romanis as evidence for the ’stressful and desperate’ state of the empire. This paper presents the case that reading the coin alongside evidence for popular military practices instead paints a picture of the Roman state apparatus deftly manipulating mass propaganda. For the Romans in the 610s, these new (...)
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  23.  46
    Scotus's Doctrine of Intuitive Cognition.Douglas C. Langston - 1993 - Synthese 96 (1):3 - 24.
  24. John vickrey Van Cleve.Douglas C. Baynton - 1999 - Semiotica 126 (1/4):143-150.
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  25.  35
    Expressions and the Stress Factor.Douglas C. Kurjian - 1983 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 58 (3):345-357.
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  26. Why Life is Necessary for Mind: The Significance of Animate Behavior.Douglas C. Long - 2010 - In James O'Shea Eric Rubenstein (ed.), Self, Language, and World:Problems from Kant, Sellars, and Rosenberg. Ridgeview Publishing Co. pp. 61-88.
    I defend the thesis that psychological states can be literally ascribed only to living creatures and not to nonliving machines, such as sophisticated robots. Defenders of machine consciousness do not sufficiently appreciate the importance of the biological nature of a subject for the psychological significance of its behavior. Simulations of a computer-controlled, nonliving autonomous robot cannot carry the same psychological meaning as animate behavior. Being a living creature is an essential link between genuinely expressive behavior and justified psychological ascriptions.
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  27.  16
    Moral Philosophy on the Threshold of Modernity (Review).Douglas C. Langston - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):475-476.
    Douglas C. Langston - Moral Philosophy on the Threshold of Modernity - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.3 475-476 Jill Kraye and Risto Saarinen, editors. Moral Philosophy on the Threshold of Modernity. New Synthese Historical Library, 57. Dordrecht: Springer, 2005. Pp. vi + 340. Cloth, e139.10. This is a collection of fifteen essays from a 2001 workshop, "Late Medieval and Early Modern Ethics and Politics," funded by the European Science Foundation as (...)
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  28.  36
    Descartes: Critical and Interpretive Essays.Douglas C. Long - 1983 - Noûs 17 (1):99-104.
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  29.  10
    Emerson and the Agrarian Tradition.Douglas C. Stenerson - 1953 - Journal of the History of Ideas 14 (1):95.
  30.  37
    Moral Scepticism and Moral Knowledge.Douglas C. Long - 1984 - Noûs 18 (1):132-136.
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  31.  83
    Other Minds.Douglas C. Long - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):179-181.
    D. C. Long’s review of a monograph Godfrey Vesey prepared on the problem of our knowledge of other minds for the Open University series on problems of philosophy. Vesey discusses philosophers’ disenchantment with the traditional argument from analogy as a solution to the problem. This has been fostered by Wittgensteinian objections to the idea that psychological words get their meaning by reference to our own “private” experiences. Vesey similarly argues for the thesis that a person cannot be said to understand (...)
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  32.  12
    The Aristotelian Background to Scotus's Rejection of the Necessary Connection of Prudence and the Moral Virtues.Douglas C. Langston - 2008 - Franciscan Studies 66:317-336.
  33.  18
    Douglas C. Hall, The Trinity. An Analysis of St. Thomas Aquinas'«Expositio» of the «De Trinitate» of Boethius.Jacques Follon - 1995 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 93 (4):635-637.
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  34. Aquinas on Conscience, the Virtues, and Weakness of Will.Douglas C. Langston - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 9:35-41.
    The intellectualistic analysis of conscience Aquinas provides appears to regard conscience as mechanistic and undynamic. Such understanding fails to place Aquinas’s remarks on conscience in the context of the virtue ethics he offers in the Summa and his Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics. In fact, there is an intricate connection between the virtues and conscience in Aquinas’s thought, and this connection relates directly to his remarks on weakness of will. His connecting conscience to issues in Aristotelian virtue ethics affects subsequent (...)
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  35. Consciousness and Causality. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1987 - Teaching Philosophy 10 (1):83-86.
    A debate between D. M. Armstrong and Norman Malcolm on the Mind-Body Problem. Physicalism vs. Wittgenstein.
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  36. The Problem of the Unity of the Representative Assembly in Hobbes’s Leviathan.Douglas C. Wadle - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (2):178-201.
    In _Leviathan_, Hobbes embraces three seemingly inconsistent claims: (i) the unity of a multitude is secured only by the unity of its representer, (ii) assemblies can represent other multitudes, and (iii) assemblies are, or are constituted by, multitudes. Together these claims require that a representative assembly, itself, be represented. If that representer is another assembly, it too will need a unifying representer, and so on. To stop a regress, we will need an already unified representer. But a multitude can only (...)
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  37. Second Thoughts: A Reply to Mr. Ginnane.Douglas C. Long - 1961 - Mind 70 (279):405-411.
    In his article "Thoughts" (MIND, July 1960) William Ginnane argues that "thought is pure intentionality," and that our thoughts are not embodied essentially in the mental imagery and other elements of phenomenology that cross our minds along with the thoughts. Such images merely illustrate out thoughts. In my discussion I resist this claim pointing out that our thoughts are often embodied in events that can be described in pheno¬menological terms, especially when our reports of our thinking are introduced by the (...)
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  38.  11
    Eye Fixation and Spatial Organization in Imagery.Douglas C. Hall - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (5):335-337.
  39.  24
    Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds.Douglas C. Long - 1979 - In Body, Mind, and Method. Dordrecht, Holland: D. Reidl. pp. 129-148.
    Hovering in the background of investigations into human physiology is the promise or threat, depending upon how one looks at the matter that human beings are complete physical-chemical systems and that all events taking place within their bodies and all movements of their bodies could be accounted for by physical causes if we but knew enough. In this paper I consider the important question whether our coming to believe that this "mechanistic" hypothesis is true would warrant our relinquishing our conception (...)
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  40.  12
    How We Should Conceive of Creation: Natural Birth as an Ethical Guidepost for Neonatal Rescue.Douglas C. McAdams, W. Kevin Conley, Kevin T. FitzGerald & G. Kevin Donovan - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (8):42-44.
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  41.  48
    Grandparental Investment and the Epiphenomenon of Menopause in Recent Human History.Douglas C. Broadfield - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):19-20.
    The effects of grandparental investment in relatives are apparent in human groups, suggesting that a postreproductive period in humans is selective. Although investment of relatives in kin produces obvious benefits for kin groups, selection for a postreproductive period in humans is not supported by evidence from chimpanzees. Instead, grandparental investment is likely a recent phenomenon of longevity, rather than an evolved feature.
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  42.  10
    Special Supplement: Empirical Research on Informed Consent: An Annotated Bibliography.Jeremy Sugarman, Douglas C. McCrory, Donald Powell, Alex Krasny, Betsy Adams, Eric Ball & Cynthia Cassell - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (1):S1.
  43.  46
    The Character of Mind. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1984 - Teaching Philosophy 7 (4):347-349.
    This is a review of The Character of Mind by Colin McGinn.
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  44.  69
    Second Thoughts: A Reply to Mr Ginnane's Thoughts.Douglas C. Long - 1961 - Mind 70 (July):405-411.
    In his article "Thoughts" (MIND, July 1960) William Ginnane argues that "thought is pure intentionality," and that our thoughts are not embodied essentially in the mental imagery and other elements of phenomenology that cross our minds along with the thoughts. Such images merely illustrate out thoughts. In my discussion I resist this claim pointing out that our thoughts are often embodied in events that can be described in phenomenological terms, especially when our reports of our thinking are introduced by the (...)
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  45. Agents, Mechanisms, and Other Minds.Douglas C. Long - 1979 - In Donald F. Gustafson & Bangs L. Tapscott (eds.), Body, Mind And Method. Dordrecht: Reidel. pp. 129--148.
    One of the goals of physiologists who study the detailed physical, chemical,and neurological mechanisms operating within the human body is to understand the intricate causal processes which underlie human abilities and activities. It is doubtless premature to predict that they will eventually be able to explain the behaviour of a particular human being as we might now explain the behaviour of a pendulum clock or even the invisible changes occurring within the hardware of a modern electronic computer. Nonetheless, it seems (...)
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  46.  40
    The Body of a Person. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1992 - International Studies in Philosophy 24 (3):113-113.
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  47.  12
    Eye Movements in Scanning Iconic Imagery.Douglas C. Hall - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):825.
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  48.  13
    Attribute Selection in Concept Identification.Douglas C. Chatfield & Erwin J. Janek - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):97.
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  49.  30
    The Metaphysics of Mind, by Michael Tye. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):959-961.
  50.  29
    Philosophical Problems and Arguments: An Introduction, 3rd Ed. [REVIEW]Douglas C. Long - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (1):82-84.
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