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Douglas Duckworth [6]Douglas S. Duckworth [6]
  1.  16
    How Nonsectarian is ‘Nonsectarian’?: Jorge Ferrer's Pluralist Alternative to Tibetan Buddhist Inclusivism.Douglas Duckworth - 2014 - Sophia 53 (3):339-348.
    This paper queries the logic of the structure of hierarchical philosophical systems. Following the Indian tradition of siddhānta, Tibetan Buddhist traditions articulate a hierarchy of philosophical views. The ‘Middle Way’ philosophy or Madhyamaka—the view that holds that the ultimate truth is emptiness—is, in general, held to be the highest view in the systematic depictions of philosophies in Tibet, and is contrasted with realist schools of thought, Buddhist and non-Buddhist. But why should an antirealist or nominalist position be said to be (...)
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  2.  81
    De/Limiting Emptiness and the Boundaries of the Ineffable.Douglas S. Duckworth - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (1):97-105.
    Emptiness ( śūnyatā ) is one of the most important topics in Buddhist thought and also is one of the most perplexing. Buddhists in Tibet have developed a sophisticated tradition of philosophical discourse on emptiness and ineffability. This paper discusses the meaning(s) of emptiness within three prominent traditions in Tibet: the Geluk ( dge lugs ), Jonang ( jo nang ), and Nyingma ( rnying ma ). I give a concise presentation of each tradition’s interpretation of emptiness and show how (...)
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  3.  22
    From Yogācāra to Philosophical Tantra in Kashmir and Tibet.Douglas Duckworth - 2018 - Sophia 57 (4):611-623.
    This paper outlines a shift in the role of self-awareness from Yogācāra to tantra and connects some of the dots between Yogācāra, Pratyabhijñā, and Buddhist tantric traditions in Tibet. As is the case with Yogācāra, the Pratyabhijñā tradition of Utpaladeva maintains that awareness is self-illuminating and constitutive of objects. Utpaladeva’s commentator and influential successor, Abhinavagupta, in fact quotes Dharmakīrti’s argument from the Pramāṇaviniścaya that objects are necessarily perceived objects. That is, everything known is known in consciousness; there is nothing that (...)
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  4.  27
    Self-Awareness and the Integration of Pramāṇa and Madhyamaka.Douglas Duckworth - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (2):207-215.
    Buddhist theories of mind pivot between two distinct interpretative strands: an epistemological tradition in which the mind, or the mental, is the foundation for valid knowledge and a tradition of deconstruction, in which there is no privileged vantage point for truth claims. The contested status of these two strands is evident in the debates surrounding the relationship between epistemology and Madhyamaka that extend from India to Tibet. The paper will focus on two exemplars of these approaches in Tibet, those of (...)
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  5.  25
    Two Models of the Two Truths: Ontological and Phenomenological Approaches. [REVIEW]Douglas S. Duckworth - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):519-527.
    Mipam (‘ju mi pham rgya mtsho, 1846–1912), an architect of the Nyingma (rnying ma) tradition of Tibet in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, articulates two distinct models of the two truths that are respectively reflected in Madhyamaka and Yogācāra Buddhist traditions. The way he positions these two models sheds light on how levels of description are at play in his integration of these traditions. Mipam positions one kind of two-truth model as the product of an ontological analysis while (...)
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  6.  13
    Other-Emptiness in the Jonang School: The Theo-Logic of Buddhist Dualism.Douglas S. Duckworth - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):485-497.
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  7.  13
    Echoes of Tsültrim Lodrö: An Indigenous Voice From Contemporary Tibet on the ‘Buddhism and Science Dialogue’.Douglas Duckworth - 2015 - Contemporary Buddhism 16 (2):267-277.
    This paper seeks to find a place for the intellectual voices of an indigenous movement of ‘Buddhist modernism’ that recently took shape in eastern Tibet. It presents how a prominent leader of this movement, Tsültrim Lodrö, articulates Buddhism in response to modern discourses of rationality and science. In particular, since the ‘dialogue’ between Buddhism and science in recent years has largely been a series of monologues, this paper seeks to open up the conversation in order to shed light on the (...)
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  8.  12
    Non-Representational Language in Mipam's Re-Presentation of Other-Emptiness.Douglas S. Duckworth - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (4):920-932.
    Buddhist traditions understand emptiness in various ways, and two streams of interpretation, “self-emptiness” and “other-emptiness” , have emerged in Tibet that help bring into focus the extent to which interpretations diverge.1 In contrast to self-emptiness, other-emptiness does not refer to a phenomenon’s lack of its own essence; it refers to the ultimate reality’s lack of all that it is not. Rather than claiming the universality of self-emptiness , proponents of other-emptiness assert another way to understand emptiness with regard to the (...)
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  9.  5
    Visions of Unity: The Golden Pandita Shakya Chokden’s New Interpretation of Yogācāra and Madhyamaka. [REVIEW]Douglas S. Duckworth - 2016 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 2:281-284.
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  10. Dignaga's Investigation of the Percept: A Philosophical Legacy in India and Tibet.Douglas Duckworth, Malcolm David Eckel, Jay L. Garfield, John Powers, Yeshes Thabkhas & Sonam Thakchoe (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Investigation of the Percept is a short work that focuses on issues of perception and epistemology. Its author, Dignaga, was one of the most influential figures in the Indian Buddhist epistemological tradition, and his ideas had a profound and wide-ranging impact in India, Tibet, and China. The work inspired more than twenty commentaries throughout East Asia and three in Tibet, the most recent in 2014.This book is the first of its kind in Buddhist studies: a comprehensive history of a text (...)
     
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  11.  6
    Jamgön Mipam: His Life and Teachings.Douglas S. Duckworth - 2011 - Shambhala.
    Jamgön Mipam (1846–1912) is one of the most extraordinary figures in the history of Tibet.
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  12. Sellars and the Stereoscopic Vision of Madhyamaka.Douglas Duckworth - 2019 - In Jay Garfield (ed.), Wilfrid Sellars and Buddhist Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 67-79.
    This chapter puts Sellars' project of unifying his two images in conversation with that of understanding how the two truth, the conventional and ultimate truth, are related in Buddhism, and in Madhyamaka in particular.
     
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