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  1.  16
    Book Review: Origination of Organismal Form. Beyond the Gene in Development and Evolutionary Biology. [REVIEW]Douglas H. Erwin - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (4):459-460.
  2.  15
    Developmental push or environmental pull? The causes of macroevolutionary dynamics.Douglas H. Erwin - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (4):36.
    Have the large-scale evolutionary patterns illustrated by the fossil record been driven by fluctuations in environmental opportunity, by biotic factors, or by changes in the types of phenotypic variants available for evolutionary change? Since the Modern Synthesis most evolutionary biologists have maintained that microevolutionary processes carrying on over sufficient time will generate macroevolutionary patterns, with no need for other pattern-generating mechanisms such as punctuated equilibrium or species selection. This view was challenged by paleontologists in the 1970s with proposals that the (...)
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  3.  42
    Eric Davidson and deep time.Douglas H. Erwin - 2017 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 39 (4):29.
    Eric Davidson had a deep and abiding interest in the role developmental mechanisms played in generating evolutionary patterns documented in deep time, from the origin of the euechinoids to the processes responsible for the morphological architectures of major animal clades. Although not an evolutionary biologist, Davidson’s interests long preceded the current excitement over comparative evolutionary developmental biology. Here I discuss three aspects at the intersection between his research and evolutionary patterns in deep time: First, understanding the mechanisms of body plan (...)
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  4.  18
    Microevolution and Macroevolution Are Not Governed by the Same Processes.Douglas H. Erwin - 2010 - In Francisco José Ayala & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Biology. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 180--193.
  5. One Very Long Argument.Douglas H. Erwin - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):17-28.
    The distribution of organisms in morphologic space is clumpy. Cats are like felids, dogs are like canids and snails are (mostly) like gastropods. But cats are not like dogs and snails are not like clams. This clumpy distribution of morphology has long posed one of the greatest challenges to evolutionary biologists. Does it represent the extinction and disappearance of a oncecontinuous distribution of morphologies, clades perched on the summits of persistent selective peaks ala Sewell Wright, or a primary signature of (...)
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