19 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Douglas L. Berger [18]Douglas Ltr Berger [1]Douglas Leo Berger [1]
See also
  1. Thinking in Transition: Nishida Kitaro and Martin Heidegger.Elmar Weinmayr, tr Krummel, John W. M. & Douglas Ltr Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):232-256.
    : Two major philosophers of the twentieth century, the German existential phenomenologist Martin Heidegger and the seminal Japanese Kyoto School philosopher Nishida Kitarō are examined here in an attempt to discern to what extent their ideas may converge. Both are viewed as expressing, each through the lens of his own tradition, a world in transition with the rise of modernity in the West and its subsequent globalization. The popularity of Heidegger's thought among Japanese philosophers, despite its own admitted limitation to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  89
    Acquiring Emptiness: Interpreting Nāgārjuna's Mmk 24:18.Douglas L. Berger - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (1):pp. 40-64.
    A pivotal focus of exegesis of Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārïkā (MMK) for the past half century has been the attempt to decipher the text's philosophy of language, and determine how this best aids us in characterizing Madhyamaka thought as a whole. In this vein, MMK 24:18 has been judged of particular weight insofar as it purportedly insists that the concepts pratītyasamutpāda (conditioned co-arising) and śūnyatā (emptiness), both indispensable to Buddhist praxis, are themselves only "nominal" or "conventional," that is, they are merely labels (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  17
    Symposium: Does Cross-Cultural Philosophy Stand in Need of a Hermeneutic Expansion?Douglas L. Berger, Hans-Georg Moeller, A. Raghuramaraju & Paul A. Roth - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1).
    Does cross-cultural philosophy stand in need of a hermeneutical expansion? In engaging with this question, the symposium focuses upon methodological issues salient to cross-cultural inquiry. Douglas L. Berger lays out the ground for the debate by arguing for a methodological approach, which is able to rectify the discipline’s colonial legacies and bridge the hermeneutical distance with its objects of study. From their own perspectives, Hans-Georg Moeller, Paul Roth and A. Raghuramaraju analyze whether such a processual and hermeneutically-sensitive approach can indeed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  65
    Review of Death, Contemplation and Schopenhauer, by R. Raj Singh. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (1):115-118.
  5.  54
    A Reply to Garfield and Westerhoff on "Acquiring Emptiness".Douglas L. Berger - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (2):368-372.
    I am most grateful to Professors Garfield and Westerhoff for their comments on my article "Acquiring Emptiness: Interpreting Nāgārjuna's MMK 24 : 18" in the January 2010 issue of Philosophy East and West. Their responses to my essay and the critiques they offer, grounded in their considerable expertise in Buddhist philosophical schools, are well argued and rooted in thorough commentarial analysis. In what follows, I attempt to respond to their critiques and concerns.There can be no doubt that the occurrence of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  97
    Indian and Cross-Cultural Philosophy in the Works of Ramakrishna Puligandla. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (2):263 - 268.
  7. The Veil of Māyā: Schopenhauer's System and Early Indian Thought.Douglas L. Berger - 2004 - Global Academic.
  8.  22
    Review of The Vivekacūḍāmaṇi of Śaṅkarācārya Bhagavatpāda: An Introduction and Translation by John Grimes. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (4):616-619.
  9.  21
    Die Interkulturalitätsdebatte: Leit- Und Streitbegriffe / Intercultural Discourse: Key and Contested Concepts. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2013 - Sophia 52 (3):561-564.
  10.  50
    Did Buddhism Ever Go East?: The Westernization of Buddhism in Chad Hansen's Daoist Historiography.Douglas L. Berger - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):38-55.
    The scholarly career of Professor Chad Hansen has been devoted in large measure to an elucidation of the relationship between the classical Chinese language and the structure and aims of pre-Qin philosophical thought. His “mass-noun” hypothesis of classical Chinese thought, his notion of dao 道 as “guiding discourse,” and his clarifications of the significance of Mohism are marked achievements from which all of us have benefited immensely. In the opening chapters of A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought, Hansen prefaces his (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  14
    Categorisation in Indian Philosophy: Thinking Inside the Box Ed. By Jessica Frazier.Douglas L. Berger - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):655-660.
    In Categorisation in Indian Philosophy: Thinking Inside the Box, Jessica Frazier has brought together an impressive array of scholars who have contributed nine essays, plus an introductory and concluding chapter, both written by her, which collectively provide a most fruitful perspective for examining classical South Asian traditions of thought. Creating categorial frameworks was certainly a prolific activity among the ancient and medieval authors of the darśanas, and indeed these authors drew heavily from pre-scholastic texts and language to build their systems. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  37
    Relational and Intrinsic Moral Roots: A Brief Contrast of Confucian and Hindu Concepts of Duty.Douglas L. Berger - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):157-163.
  13.  14
    Divine Self, Human Self: The Philosophy of Being in Two Gītā Commentaries by Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad.Douglas L. Berger - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (2):626-630.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  12
    Review of Parimal G. Patil, Against a Hindu God: Buddhist Philosophy of Religion in India. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2015 - Journal of Buddhist Philosophy 1:235-237.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  31
    In Search of Affinities: Knowledge and Action in Indian Thought. [REVIEW]Douglas L. Berger - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 583-593.
  16. Comment and Discussion.Douglas L. Berger - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (2):365-367.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Illocution, No-Theory and Practice in Nagarjuna’s Skepticism.Douglas L. Berger - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 24:7-13.
    In verse nine of the Vigrahavyavartani, Nagarjuna gives a defense of his skepticism by insisting that he makes no proposition concerning the nature of reality. B. K. Matilal has argued that this position is not an untenable one for a skeptic to hold, using as an explanatory model Searle’s distinction between a propositional and an illocutionary negation. The argument runs that Nagarjuna does not refute rival philosophical positions by simply refuting whatever positive claims those positions might make, but rather he (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Neil Young and Philosophy.Douglas L. Berger (ed.) - 2019 - Lexington Books.
    Neil Young and Philosophy examines the music, career, and life of Neil Young from a variety of philosophical perspectives in ethics, socio-political thought, and aesthetics. It will be of great interest both to Neil Young fans and to scholars and teachers of philosophy and culture.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. "Veil of Maya, The": Schopenhauer's System and Early Indian Thought.Douglas L. Berger - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    Explores the interpretive problems, complexities, and legacies of Schopenhauer’s encounter with ancient India.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark