27 found
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  1.  72
    Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in human reproductive strategies.Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):75-91.
    The finding that women are attracted to men older than themselves whereas men are attracted to relatively younger women has been explained by social psychologists in terms of economic exchange rooted in traditional sex-role norms. An alternative evolutionary model suggests that males and females follow different reproductive strategies, and predicts a more complex relationship between gender and age preferences. In particular, males' preferences for relatively younger females should be minimal during early mating years, but should become more pronounced as the (...)
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  2.  18
    Personality traits and the eye of the beholder: Crossing some traditional philosophical boundaries in the search for consistency in all of the people.Douglas T. Kenrick & David O. Stringfield - 1980 - Psychological Review 87 (1):88-104.
  3.  13
    Altruism, Darwinism, and the gift of Josiah Wedgewood.Douglas T. Kenrick - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):531-532.
  4.  8
    Dynamical evolutionary psychology: Individual decision rules and emergent social norms.Douglas T. Kenrick, Norman P. Li & Jonathan Butner - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):3-28.
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  5.  13
    The behavioral ecology of cultural psychological variation.Oliver Sng, Steven L. Neuberg, Michael E. W. Varnum & Douglas T. Kenrick - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (5):714-743.
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  6.  10
    Biology: Si! Hard-wired ability: Maybe no.Douglas T. Kenrick - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):199-200.
  7.  21
    Do these sociobiologists have an answer for everything?Douglas T. Kenrick - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):299-300.
  8.  12
    Sex differences in age preference: Universal reality or ephemeral construction?Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):119-133.
    The finding that women are attracted to men older than themselves whereas men are attracted to relatively younger women has been explained by social psychologists in terms of economic exchange rooted in traditional sex-role norms. An alternative evolutionary model suggests that males and females follow different reproductive strategies, and predicts a more complex relationship between gender and age preferences. In particular, males' preferences for relatively younger females should be minimal during early mating years, but should become more pronounced as the (...)
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  9.  12
    Selflessness examined: Is avoiding tar and feathers nonegoistic?Douglas T. Kenrick - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):711-712.
  10.  19
    How do cultural variations emerge from universal mechanisms?Douglas T. Kenrick & Jill M. Sundie - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):827-828.
    Diverse cultural norms governing economic behavior might emerge from a dynamic interaction of universal but flexible predispositions that get calibrated to biologically meaningful features of the local social and physical ecology. This impressive cross-cultural effort could better elucidate such gene-culture interactions by incorporating theory-driven experimental manipulations (e.g., comparing kin and non-kin exchanges), as well as analyses of mediating cognitive processes.
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  11.  43
    Selfishness and sex or cooperation and family values?Joshua M. Ackerman & Douglas T. Kenrick - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):21-21.
    Evolutionary models of behavior often encounter resistance due to an apparent focus on themes of sex, selfishness, and gender differences. The target article might seem ripe for such criticism. However, life history theory suggests that these themes, and their counterparts, including cooperation, generosity, and gender similarities, represent two sides of the same coin – all are consequences of reproductive trade-offs made throughout development.
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  12.  14
    Selfish goals serve more fundamental social and biological goals.D. Vaughn Becker & Douglas T. Kenrick - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):137-138.
    Proximate selfish goals reflect the machinations of more fundamental goals such as self-protection and reproduction. Evolutionary life history theory allows us to make predictions about which goals are prioritized over others, which stimuli release which goals, and how the stages of cognitive processing are selectively influenced to better achieve the aims of those goals.
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  13.  35
    Paradoxical self-deception: Maybe not so paradoxical after all.Stephanie L. Brown & Douglas T. Kenrick - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):109-110.
    The simultaneous possession of conflicting beliefs is both possible and logical within current models of human cognition. Specifically, evidence of lateral inhibition and state-dependent memory suggests a means by which conflicting beliefs can coexist without requiring “mental exotica.” We suggest that paradoxical self-deception enables the self-deceiver to store important information for use at a later time.
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  14.  79
    Ecological variability and religious beliefs.Adam B. Cohen, Douglas T. Kenrick & Yexin Jessica Li - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):468-468.
    Religious beliefs, including those about an afterlife and omniscient spiritual beings, vary across cultures. We theorize that such variations may be predictably linked to ecological variations, just as differences in mating strategies covary with resource distribution. Perhaps beliefs in a soul or afterlife are more common when resources are unpredictable, and life is brutal and short.
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  15.  37
    Al Capone, discrete morphs, and complex dynamic systems.Douglas T. Kenrick & Stephanie Brown - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):560-561.
    We consider four mechanisms by which apparent discontinuities in the distribution of antisociality could arise: (1) executive genes or hormonal systems, (2) multiplicative interactions of predisposing factors, (3) environmental tracking into a limited number of social roles, and (4) cross-generational gene—environment interactions. A more explicit consideration of complex self-organizing dynamic systems may help us understand the maintenance of antisocial subpopulations.
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  16.  22
    Age preferences in Mates: An even closer look, without the distorting lenses.Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):140-143.
    Einon's data support our original claims, although not a claim she seems to assume – of reciprocal attraction between elderly men and 20-year-old women. Implicit in her commentary is an assumption that genetic predispositions are omniscient fitness maximizers. Instead, evolutionary models assume selection-fashioned psychological mechanisms that, in the context of other mechanisms and pressures in past environments, had a positive effect on fitness relative to competing alternatives. The Over & Phillips data fit with our own data on homosexuals, and with (...)
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  17.  19
    A single self-deceived or several subselves divided?Douglas T. Kenrick & Andrew E. White - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):29-30.
    Would we lie to ourselves? We don't need to. Rather than a single self equipped with a few bivariate processes, the mind is composed of a dissociated aggregation of subselves processing qualitatively different information relevant to different adaptive problems. Each subself selectively processes the information coming in to the brain as well as information previously stored in the brain.
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  18.  15
    Dynamical systems and mating decision rules.Douglas T. Kenrick, Norman Li & Jonathan E. Butner - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):607-608.
    Dynamical simulations of male and female mating strategies illustrate how traits such as restrictedness constrain, and are constrained by, local ecology. Such traits cannot be defined solely by genotype or by phenotype, but are better considered as decision rules gauged to ecological inputs. Gangestad & Simpson's work draws attention to the need for additional bridges between evolutionary psychology and dynamical systems theory.
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  19.  13
    Gender and sexual orientation: Why the different age preferences?Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):582-584.
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  20.  12
    More holes in social roles.Douglas T. Kenrick & Vladas Griskevicius - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):283 - 285.
    Given the strength of Archer's case for a sexual selection account, he is too accommodating of the social roles alternative. We present data on historical changes in violent crime contradicting that perspective, and discuss recent evidence showing how an evolutionary perspective predicts sex similarities and differences responding in a flexible and functional manner to adaptively relevant triggers across different domains.
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  21.  20
    One path to balance and order in social psychology: An evolutionary perspective.Douglas T. Kenrick & Jon K. Maner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):346-347.
    Consideration of the adaptive problems faced by our ancestors suggests functional reasons why people exhibit some biases in social judgment more than others. We present a taxonomy consisting of six domains of central social challenges. Each is associated with somewhat different motivations, and consequently different decision-rules. These decision-rules, in turn, make some biases inherently more likely to emerge than others.
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  22.  7
    Personality: Idiographic and Nomotheticp A rejoinder.Douglas T. Kenrick & Sanford L. Braver - 1982 - Psychological Review 89 (2):182-186.
  23.  94
    Saturday night social constructivism.Douglas T. Kenrick - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):227-228.
    In contrast to evidence for evolved sex differences, support for the argument that female aggression was suppressed by patriarchial ideologies is thin. One empirical test of the differential stigmatization hypothesis is proposed, utilizing the four standard criteria for judgments of abnormality.
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  24.  21
    Social traits, self-observations, and other hypothetical constructs.Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):561.
  25.  17
    Testosterone's role in dominance, sex, and aggression: Why so controversial?Douglas T. Kenrick & Alicia Barr - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):379-380.
    Testosterone's connection to sex differences and key evolutionary processes arouses controversy. Effects on humans and other species, though, are not robotically deterministic but are parts of complex interactions. We discuss the societal implications of these findings and consider how the naturalistic fallacy and the person–situation dichotomy contribute to misunderstandings here.
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  26.  15
    Time to integrate sociobiology and social psychology.Douglas T. Kenrick & Richard C. Keefe - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):24-26.
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  27. Where and When Are Women More Selective Than Men?Douglas T. Kenrick, Edward R. Sadalla, Gary Groth & Melanie R. Trost - forthcoming - Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
     
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