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Douglas B. White [13]Douglas White [7]Douglas R. White [3]Douglas M. White [1]
  1.  33
    Eliminating Categorical Exclusion Criteria in Crisis Standards of Care Frameworks.Catherine L. Auriemma, Ashli M. Molinero, Amy J. Houtrow, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White & Scott D. Halpern - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):28-36.
    During public health crises including the COVID-19 pandemic, resource scarcity and contagion risks may require health systems to shift—to some degree—from a usual clinical ethic, focused on the well-being of individual patients, to a public health ethic, focused on population health. Many triage policies exist that fall under the legal protections afforded by “crisis standards of care,” but they have key differences. We critically appraise one of the most fundamental differences among policies, namely the use of criteria to categorically exclude (...)
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  2.  51
    Respecting Disability Rights — Toward Improved Crisis Standards of Care.Michelle M. Mello, Govind Persad & Douglas B. White - 2020 - New England Journal of Medicine (5):DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2011997.
    We propose six guideposts that states and hospitals should follow to respect disability rights when designing policies for the allocation of scarce, lifesaving medical treatments. Four relate to criteria for decisions. First, do not use categorical exclusions, especially ones based on disability or diagnosis. Second, do not use perceived quality of life. Third, use hospital survival and near-term prognosis (e.g., death expected within a few years despite treatment) but not long-term life expectancy. Fourth, when patients who use ventilators in their (...)
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  3.  19
    Promoting equity with a multi-principle framework to allocate scarce ICU resources.Douglas White & Bernard Lo - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):133-135.
    We wholeheartedly agree with Schmidt and colleagues’ efforts to promote equity in intensive care unit triage. We also take issue with their characterisation of the New Jersey allocation framework for ICU beds and ventilators, which is modelled after the multi-principle allocation framework we developed early in the pandemic. They characterise it as a two-criterion allocation framework and claim—without evidence—that it will ‘compound disadvantage for black patients’. However, the NJ triage framework—like the model allocation policy we developed—actually contains four allocation criteria: (...)
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  4.  25
    How do clinicians prepare family members for the role of surrogate decision-maker?Thomas V. Cunningham, Leslie P. Scheunemann, Robert M. Arnold & Douglas White - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1):21-26.
    Purpose Although surrogate decision-making is prevalent in intensive care units and concerns with decision quality are well documented, little is known about how clinicians help family members understand the surrogate role. We investigated whether and how clinicians provide normative guidance to families regarding how to function as a surrogate. Subjects and methods We audiorecorded and transcribed 73 ICU family conferences in which clinicians anticipated discussing goals of care for incapacitated patients at high risk of death. We developed and applied a (...)
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  5.  14
    Structural Inequities, Fair Opportunity, and the Allocation of Scarce ICU Resources.Douglas B. White & Bernard Lo - 2021 - Hastings Center Report 51 (5):42-47.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 51, Issue 5, Page 42-47, September‐October 2021.
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  6. Categorized priority systems: a new tool for fairly allocating scarce medical resources in the face of profound social inequities.Tayfun Sönmez, Parag A. Pathak, M. Utku Ünver, Govind Persad, Robert D. Truog & Douglas B. White - 2021 - Chest 153 (3):1294-1299.
    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has motivated medical ethicists and several task forces to revisit or issue new guidelines on allocating scarce medical resources. Such guidelines are relevant for the allocation of scarce therapeutics and vaccines and for allocation of ICU beds, ventilators, and other life-sustaining treatments or potentially scarce interventions. Principles underlying these guidelines, like saving the most lives, mitigating disparities, reciprocity to those who assume additional risk (eg, essential workers and clinical trial participants), and equal access may (...)
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  7. Should Pediatric Patients Be Prioritized When Rationing Life-Saving Treatments During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Ryan M. Antiel, Farr A. Curlin, Govind Persad, Douglas B. White, Cathy Zhang, Aaron Glickman, Ezekiel J. Emanuel & John Lantos - 2020 - Pediatrics 146 (3):e2020012542.
    Coronavirus disease 2019 can lead to respiratory failure. Some patients require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. During the current pandemic, health care resources in some cities have been overwhelmed, and doctors have faced complex decisions about resource allocation. We present a case in which a pediatric hospital caring for both children and adults seeks to establish guidelines for the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation if there are not enough resources to treat every patient. Experts in critical care, end-of-life care, bioethics, and (...)
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  8.  53
    Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification.Cheryl J. Misak, Douglas B. White & Robert D. Truog - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (1):90-114.
    This paper reframes the futility debate, moving away from the question “Who decides when to end what is considered to be a medically inappropriate or futile treatment?” and toward the question “How can society make policy that will best account for the multitude of values and conflicts involved in such decision-making?” It offers a pragmatist moral epistemology that provides us with a clear justification of why it is important to take best standards, norms, and physician judgment seriously and a clear (...)
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  9.  18
    Medically Inappropriate or Futile Treatment: Deliberation and Justification.Cheryl J. Misak, Douglas B. White & Robert D. Truog - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhv035.
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  10.  33
    Surgeons, Intensivists, and Discretion to Refuse Requested Treatments.Mark R. Wicclair & Douglas B. White - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (5):33-42.
    Physicians are expected to engage patients as partners in identifying the possible benefits and harms associated with treatment options and selecting from among medically appropriate treatment options, rather than simply dictating what treatments patients will and will not receive. This collaborative model reflects the recognition that citizens in multicultural societies have diverse values and are likely to have different views about whether the possible benefits of a medical intervention outweigh the possible harms. However, there are circumstances in which the collaborative (...)
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  11.  22
    Resolving Family-Clinician Disputes in the Context of Contested Definitions of Futility.Gabriel T. Bosslet, Bernard Lo & Douglas B. White - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (3):314-318.
    We appreciate the opportunity to respond to Schneiderman and colleagues’ opinions on the recent Multiorganization Policy Statement, “An Official ATS/AACN/ACCP/ESICM/SCCM Policy Statement: Responding to Requests for Potentially Inappropriate Treatments in Intensive Care Units”. We will first point out three areas in which Schneiderman and colleagues seem to perceive a disagreement where there is none, then we will respond to their main criticisms of the Multiorganization Policy Statement. In doing so, we will point out areas in which we believe Schneiderman and (...)
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  12.  44
    A pilot study of neonatologists' decision-making roles in delivery room resuscitation counseling for periviable births.Brownsyne Tucker Edmonds, Fatima McKenzie, Janet E. Panoch, Douglas B. White & Amber E. Barnato - 2016 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):175-182.
    Background: Relatively little is known about neonatologists' roles in helping families navigate the difficult decision to attempt or withhold resuscitation for a neonate delivering at the threshold...
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  13.  23
    A multicenter study of key stakeholders' perspectives on communicating with surrogates about prognosis in intensive care units.Wendy G. Anderson, Jenica W. Cimino, Natalie C. Ernecoff, Anna Ungar, Kaitlin J. Shotsberger, Laura A. Pollice, Praewpannarai Buddadhumaruk, Shannon S. Carson, J. Randall Curtis, Catherine L. Hough, Bernard Lo, Michael A. Matthay, Michael W. Peterson, Jay S. Steingrub & Douglas B. White - unknown
    RationaleSurrogates of critically ill patients often have inaccurate expectations about prognosis. Yet there is little research on how intensive care unit clinicians should discuss prognosis, and existing expert opinion-based recommendations give only general guidance that has not been validated with surrogate decision makers.ObjectiveTo determine the perspectives of key stakeholders regarding how prognostic information should be conveyed in critical illness.MethodsThis was a multicenter study at three academic medical centers in California, Pennsylvania, and Washington. One hundred eighteen key stakeholders completed in-depth semistructured (...)
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  14.  3
    How Seeking Transfer Often Fails to Help Define Medically Inappropriate Treatment.Douglas B. White & Thaddeus M. Pope - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (2):2-2.
    On September 1, 2023, Texas made important revisions to it its decades‐old statute granting legal safe harbor immunity to physicians who withhold or withdraw life‐sustaining treatment over the objection of critically ill patients’ surrogate decision‐makers. However, lawmakers left untouched glaring flaws in a key safeguard for patients—the transfer option. The transfer option is ethically important because, when no hospital is willing to accept the patient in transfer, that fact is taken as strong evidence that the surrogates’ treatment requests fall outside (...)
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  15.  54
    Do Physicians Disclose Uncertainty When Discussing Prognosis in Grave Critical Illness?Rachel A. Schuster, Seo Yeon Hong, Robert M. Arnold & Douglas B. White - 2012 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):125-135.
    Objective: Even when critically ill patients are almost certain to die from their illnesses, there is generally an element of prognostic uncertainty. Little is known about how physicians handle this uncertainty in conversations with surrogate decision makers. We sought to evaluate whether and how physicians discuss prognostic uncertainty with surrogate decision makers of patients who are highly likely, but not certain, to die. Design: We audiotaped and transcribed discussions between clinicians and surrogate decision makers at two major California teaching hospitals (...)
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  16. Right Marriage.Frank Russell Barry, Claud Mullins & Douglas White - 1934 - Student Christian Movement Press.
  17.  14
    Eugenics and venereal disease.Douglas White - 1913 - The Eugenics Review 5 (3):264.
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  18.  4
    Feebleness of growth and congenital dwarfism.Douglas White - 1924 - The Eugenics Review 15 (4):608.
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  19.  15
    Social control of sex expression.Douglas White - 1931 - The Eugenics Review 22 (4):290.
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  20.  13
    The female sex cycle.Douglas White - 1937 - The Eugenics Review 28 (4):340.
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  21.  79
    The navigability of strong ties: Small worlds, tie strength, and network topology.Douglas R. White & Michael Houseman - 2002 - Complexity 8 (1):72-81.
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  22. The Sufferings of the Saints.Douglas M. White - 1947
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  23.  74
    Class, property, and structural endogamy: Visualizing networked histories. [REVIEW]Lilyan A. Brudner & Douglas R. White - 1997 - Theory and Society 26 (2-3):161-208.