Results for 'Dreaming'

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  1.  2
    Philosophical Abstracts.Jerome A. Shafer Dreaming - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (2).
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  2. Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States.J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold - 2003 - In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. pp. 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  3. Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States.J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):793-842; 904-1018; 1083-1121.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are (...)
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  4.  86
    Dreaming and the Brain: From Phenomenology to Neurophysiology.Nir Yuval & Tononi Giulio - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):88-100.
    Dreams are a remarkable experiment in psychology and neuroscience, conducted every night in every sleeping person. They show that the human brain, disconnected from the environment, can generate an entire world of conscious experiences by itself. Content analysis and developmental studies have promoted understanding of dream phenomenology. In parallel, brain lesion studies, functional imaging and neurophysiology have advanced current knowledge of the neural basis of dreaming. It is now possible to start integrating these two strands of research to address (...)
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  5. Free Energy and Virtual Reality in Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience: A Complexity Theory of Dreaming and Mental Disorder.Jim Hopkins - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    This paper compares the free energy neuroscience now advocated by Karl Friston and his colleagues with that hypothesised by Freud, arguing that Freud's notions of conflict and trauma can be understood in terms of computational complexity. It relates Hobson and Friston's work on dreaming and the reduction of complexity to contemporary accounts of dreaming and the consolidation of memory, and advances the hypothesis that mental disorder can be understood in terms of computational complexity and the mechanisms, including synaptic (...)
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  6. Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms.Mark Solms - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The (...)
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  7. Luminescent Physicalism, A Book Review of Evan Thompson's *Waking, Dreaming, Being*. [REVIEW]Gregory M. Nixon - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (9-10):262-267.
    This is a fine book by an extraordinary author whose literary followers have awaited a definitive statement of his views on consciousness since his participation in the important book on biological autopoiesis, The Embodied Mind (Varela, Thompson, & Rosch, 1991) and his recent neurophenomenology of biological systems, Mind in Life (2007). In the latter book, Thompson demonstrated the continuity of life and mind, whereas in this book he uses neurophenomenology as well as erudite renditions of Buddhist philosophy and a good (...)
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  8.  80
    The Immersive Spatiotemporal Hallucination Model of Dreaming.Jennifer M. Windt - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and (...)
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  9. Dreaming and Consciousness: Testing the Threat Simulation Theory of the Function of Dreaming.Antti Revonsuo & Katja Valli - 2000 - Psyche 6 (8).
    We tested the new threat simulation theory of the biological function of dreaming by analysing 592 dreams from 52 subjects with a rating scale developed for quantifying threatening events in dreams. The main predictions were that dreams contain more frequent and more severe threats than waking life does; that dream threats are realistic; and that they primarily threaten the Dream Self who tends to behave in a relevant defensive manner in response to them. These predictions were confirmed and the (...)
     
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  10. Self-Awareness in Dreaming.Miloslava Kozmová & Richard N. Wolman - 2006 - Dreaming 16 (3):196-214.
     
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  11. Dreaming.John Sutton - 2009 - In John Symons & Paco Calvo (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge.
    As a topic in the philosophy of psychology, dreaming is a fascinating, diverse, and severely underdeveloped area of study. The topic excites intense public interest in its own right, while also challenging our confidence that we know what the words “conscious” and “consciousness” mean. So dreaming should be at the forefront of our interdisciplinary investigations: theories of mind which fail to address the topic are incomplete. This chapter illustrates the tight links between conceptual and empirical issues by highlighting (...)
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  12. The Philosophy of Dreaming and Self-Consciousness: What Happens to the Experiential Subject During the Dream State?Jennifer Michelle Windt & Thomas Metzinger - 2007 - In Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives. Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 193-247.
  13. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen J. Flanagan - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the (...)
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  14. Consciousness in Dreaming: A Metacognitive Approach.Tracey L. Kahan - 2001 - In Kelly Bulkeley (ed.), Dreams: A Reader on Religious, Cultural, and Psychological Dimensions of Dreaming. Palgrave. pp. 333-360.
  15.  89
    Dreaming.Brian O'Shaughnessy - 2002 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):399-432.
    The aim is to discover a principle governing the formation of the dream. Now dreaming has an analogy with consciousness in that it is a seeming-consciousness. Meanwhile consciousness exhibits a tripartite structure consisting of understanding oneself to be situated in a world endowed with given properties, the mental processes responsible for the state, and the concrete perceptual encounter of awareness with the world. The dream analogues of these three elements are investigated in the hope of discovering the source of (...)
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  16.  11
    State Dependence of Character Perception: Implausibility Differences in Dreaming and Waking Consciousness.David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson - 2003 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):57-68.
    Dreaming consciousness can be quite different from waking consciousness and this difference must depend upon the underlying neurobiology. Our approach is to infer the underlying brain basis for this difference by studying dream reports and comparing them with waking. In this study we investigated mentation during dreaming by asking subjects to provide us with dream reports and by asking them to create a dream log. In the dream log, the subjects recorded all implausibility, illogicality or inappropriateness of character (...)
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  17.  22
    Dreaming and the Self-Organizing Brain.Allan Combs, David Kahn & Stanley Krippner - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (7):4-11.
    We argue that the rapid eye movement dream experiences owe their structure and meaning to inherent self-organizing properties of the brain itself. Thus, we offer a common meeting ground for brain based studies of dreaming and traditional psychological dream theory. Our view is that the dreaming brain is a self-organizing system highly sensitive to internally generated influences. Several lines of evidence support a process view of the brain as a system near the edge of chaos, one that is (...)
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  18.  5
    Dreaming Consciousness: A Contribution From Phenomenology.Nicola Zippel - 2016 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (2):180-201.
    : The central aim of this paper is to offer a historical reconstruction of phenomenological studies on dreaming and to put forward a draft for a phenomenological theory of the dream state. Prominent phenomenologists have offered an extremely valuable interpretation of the dream as an intentional process, stressing its relevance in understanding the complexity of the mental life of subject, the continuous interplay between reality and unreality, and the possibility of building parallel spheres of experience influencing the development of (...)
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  19. What's the Point of a Dreaming Argument?Scott Stapleford - forthcoming - Think.
    In this paper, I argue that dreaming arguments are no cause for alarm.
     
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  20. Dreaming and Certainty.Jim Stone - 1984 - Philosophical Studies 45 (May):353-368.
    I argue that being wide awake is an epistemic virtue which enables me to recognize immediately that I'm wide awake. Also I argue that dreams are imaginings and that the wide awake mind can immediately discern the difference between imaginings and vivid sense experience. Descartes need only pinch himself.
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  21. Dreaming and Skepticism.Norman Malcolm - 1956 - Philosophical Review 65 (January):14-37.
  22.  82
    Varieties of Lucid Dreaming Experience.S. LaBerge & D. DeGracia - 2000 - In Robert G. Kunzendorf & B. Alan Wallace (eds.), Individual Differences in Conscious Experience. John Benjamins. pp. 269--307.
  23. Professor Norman Malcolm: Dreaming.David F. Pears - 1961 - Mind 70 (April):145-163.
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  24.  11
    Dreaming, Adaptation, and Consciousness: The Social Mapping Hypothesis.Derek P. Brereton - 2000 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 28 (3):377-409.
  25. Dreaming: Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Hypotheses.Mark Solms - 2002 - In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. pp. 123-131.
  26.  4
    Dreaming Consciousness Explored.B. Gardiner Judy - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (2):141-165.
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  27.  66
    Stern's Dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1959 - Analysis 19 (December):47.
  28.  37
    The Difference Between Dreaming and Being Awake.J. F. M. Hunter - 1983 - Mind 92 (January):80-93.
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  29.  56
    On Ernest Sosa's "on Dreaming".Bruce Wilshire - 2006 - Pluralist 1 (1):53-62.
  30.  53
    The Concept of Dreaming.Vere C. Chappell - 1963 - Philosophical Quarterly 13 (July):193-213.
  31.  46
    Malcolm's Dreaming.K. Stern - 1959 - Analysis 19 (December):44-46.
  32. Children's Dreaming and the Development of Consciousness. [REVIEW]Mauricio Infante & Lloyd A. Wells - 2004 - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 43 (12):1519-1520.
  33.  10
    Dreaming an Impossible Dream.Donald S. Mannison - 1975 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (June):663-75.
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  34.  40
    Malcolm on Dreaming.Martin Kramer - 1962 - Mind 71 (January):81-86.
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  35.  37
    Dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1959 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
  36.  36
    The Concept of Dreaming: On Three Theses by Malcolm.S. Schroeder - 1997 - Philosophical Investigations 20 (1):15-38.
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  37.  36
    Wittgenstein, Freud, Dreaming and Education: Psychoanalytic Explanation as 'Une Façon de Parler'.James D. Marshall - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):606-620.
    Freud saw the dream as occupying a very important position in his theoretical model. If there were to be problems with his theoretical account of the dream then this would impinge upon proposed therapy and, of course, education as the right balance between the instincts and the institution of culture. Wittgenstein, whilst stating that Freud was interesting and important, raised several issues in relation to psychology/psychoanalysis, and to Freud in particular. Why would Wittgenstein have seen Freud as having some important (...)
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  38. Dreaming and 'Depth Grammar'.Hilary Putnam - 1962 - In Ronald J. Butler (ed.), Analytical Philosophy: First Series. Oxford University Press.
     
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  39.  23
    Nelson on Dreaming a Pain.Michael P. Hodges & William R. Carter - 1969 - Philosophical Studies 20 (April):43-46.
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  40.  18
    Dreaming.Brian Cantwell Smith - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):48-57.
  41.  21
    A Plea to Stop Dreaming About Dreaming.Neil A. Gallagher - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (March):423-424.
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  42.  17
    Some Questions About Dreaming.J. F. M. Hunter - 1971 - Mind 80 (January):70-92.
  43.  43
    Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming.E. Bentley - 2000 - Routledge.
  44. Conscious Unity, Emotion, Dreaming, and the Solution of the Hard Problem.Rodney M. J. Cotterill - 2003 - In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  45. Philosophical Essays on Dreaming.Charles E. M. Dunlop (ed.) - 1977 - Cornell University Press.
  46. Lucid Dreaming: Exerting the Creativity of the Unconscious.Tarab Tulku - 2000 - In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser. pp. 271-283.
     
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  47. The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming.Antti Revonsuo - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content (...)
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  48. Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy.Evan Thompson & Stephen Batchelor - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain. Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or daydream, (...)
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  49. Dreaming and Imagination.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):103-121.
    Penultimate draft; please refer to published version. I argue, on philosophical, psychological, and neurophysiological grounds, that contrary to an orthodox view, dreams do not typically involve misleading sensations and false beliefs. I am thus in partial agreement with Colin McGinn, who has argued that we do not have misleading sensory experience while dreaming, and partially in agreement with Ernest Sosa, who has argued that we do not form false beliefs while dreaming. Rather, on my view, dreams involve mental (...)
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  50.  33
    Waking and Dreaming: Related but Structurally Independent. Dream Reports of Congenitally Paraplegic and Deaf-Mute Persons.Ursula Voss, Inka Tuin, Karin Schermelleh-Engel & Allan Hobson - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):673-687.
    Models of dream analysis either assume a continuum of waking and dreaming or the existence of two dissociated realities. Both approaches rely on different methodology. Whereas continuity models are based on content analysis, discontinuity models use a structural approach. In our study, we applied both methods to test specific hypotheses about continuity or discontinuity. We contrasted dream reports of congenitally deaf-mute and congenitally paraplegic individuals with those of non-handicapped controls. Continuity theory would predict that either the deficit itself or (...)
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