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  1.  21
    Pastoral Vignettes.Drew Morgan - 2004 - Newman Studies Journal 1 (2):102-103.
    For Newman the Roman Catholic, the Oratorian way of life resonated with his experience as a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford: the Oratory was a place of stability that provided an opportunity for scholarship. This article examines three aspects of the Oratorian idea of scholarship: the spiritual formation of the intellect; the role of the laity in a Catholic university; and the importance of personal influence inevangelization—educational ideals that are as fundamentally important today as they were in Newman’s time.
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  2.  13
    Newman the Businessman.Drew Morgan - 2006 - Newman Studies Journal 3 (1):73-74.
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    Newman and the Oratorian Idea of Scholarship.Drew Morgan - 2004 - Newman Studies Journal 1 (2):26-37.
    For Newman the Roman Catholic, the Oratorian way of life resonated with his experience as a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford: the Oratory was a place of stability that provided an opportunity for scholarship. This article examines three aspects of the Oratorian idea of scholarship: the spiritual formation of the intellect; the role of the laity in a Catholic university; and the importance of personal influence inevangelization—educational ideals that are as fundamentally important today as they were in Newman’s time.
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    Awakening The Dream of Gerontius.Drew Morgan - 2005 - Newman Studies Journal 2 (2):36-51.
    The publication of his Apologia pro Vita Sua (1864) brought Newman back into contact with many of his Anglican friends—two of whom gifted him with a violin. In his letter of appreciation, Newman mused: “Perhaps thought is music.” Such would seem to be the case with his poem, The Dream of Gerontius (1865), which was set to music by Sir Edward Elgar (1900). This essay explores the relationship between Newman’s Apologia and The Dream of Gerontius and then analyzes the latter’s (...)
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