13 found
Order:
  1. An Essay on the History of Civil Society.Adam Ferguson & Duncan Forbes - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (162):382-383.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   80 citations  
  2.  25
    Hume and the Scottish Enlightenment: Duncan Forbes.Duncan Forbes - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 12:94-109.
    The term ‘Scottish Enlightenment’ annoys some Scottish historians, because to them it seems to suggest that a state of unenlightenment prevailed in Scotland before the mideighteenth century, but ‘enlightenment’ when used by the historian of ideas is simply a technical term to describe certain aspects of eighteenth-century thought. The trouble is in defining precisely what aspects of eighteenth-century thought it is meant to describe. Different people study the eighteenth century Scottish thinkers for different reasons; for Professor Pocock, for example, they (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  26
    Hume's Philosophical Politics.Duncan Forbes - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of Hume's political thought based on a survey of all his writings in their original and revised versions, with very full reference to the works of predecessors and contemporaries, including journalists, pamphleteers and historians. Hume's political thinking is presented in its historical context as a modem, 'philosophical', empirically based system of politics for a new post-revolutionary age, and a political education for parochial, backward-looking party men.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Natural Law and the Scottish Enlightenment.Duncan Forbes - 1982 - In Campbell & Skinner (ed.), The Origins and Nature of the Scottish Enlightenment. pp. 186--204.
  5. Hume.Terence Penelhum & Duncan Forbes - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):367-369.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  7
    Aesthetic Thoughts on Doing the History of Ideas.Duncan Forbes - 2001 - History of European Ideas 27 (2):101-113.
  7. The Liberal Anglican Idea of History.Duncan Forbes - 1952 - Cambridge University Press.
    This essay, which won the Prince Consort Prize for 1950, treats of the revolutionary change in historical writing that followed the entry into England, early in the nineteenth century, of the ideas of Vico and of the German historical school. Chiefly through Coleridge's influence, eighteenth-century rationalist suppositions gave place in certain men to a fundamentally opposed, 'Romantic' philosophy, and so to a new kind of History. Mr. Forbes is particularly concerned with the part played in this revolution by the liberal (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  27
    Natural Law.Duncan Forbes - 1976 - The Owl of Minerva 8 (2):1-2.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  4
    Freedom and History. The Semantics of Philosophical Controversies and Ideological Conflicts.The Liberal Anglican Idea of History.R. Mckeon & Duncan Forbes - 1953 - Philosophical Quarterly 3 (12):280-281.
  10.  2
    Natural Law: The Scientific Ways of Treating Natural Law, Its Place in Moral Philosophy, and Its Relation to the Positive Sciences of Law. [REVIEW]Duncan Forbes - 1976 - The Owl of Minerva 8 (2):1-2.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Letter to a Bishop, Concerning Some Important Discoveries in Philosophy and Theology. First Printed in the Year 1732.Duncan Forbes, H. Woodfall & Anne Dodd - 1735 - Printed by H. Woodfall; and Sold by A. Dodd, at the Peacock Without Temple-Bar.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. G. W. F. Hegel. Natural Law. [REVIEW]Duncan Forbes - 1976 - The Owl of Minerva 8 (2):7-2.
    Professor Knox’s translation is, as one would expect, excellent. Even so, understanding this text will present difficulties to anyone who is anything less than expert not only in the philosophy of Hegel, but in those of Kant, Fichte and, especially, Schelling, because Hegel’s philosophy in 1802–3 was still by no means fully-fledged. The result is that the usual difficulties of Hegelian terminology are compounded by the infusion of the terminology and philosophical programme of Schelling; one’s tendency to interpret the text (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The History of Great Britain the Reigns of James I and Charles I.David Hume & Duncan Forbes - 1970
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark