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  1. Mark Johnston's Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample?Duncan McFarland - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C's application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston's "missing-explanation argument" employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are inconsistent. (...)
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    Crane on Concepts and Experiential Content.Duncan McFarland - 1998 - Analysis 58 (1):54-58.
  3.  39
    British Society for Ethical Theory 1998 Conference.Garrett Cullity, Alex Miller, Duncan McFarland, James Griffin, R. Jay Wallace, Iain Law, Ralph Wedgwood, Maggie Little, Nick Zangwill & Elinor Mason - 1998 - Journal of Ethics 2 (189):189-189.
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    Response-Dependence Without Reduction?Duncan McFarland & Alexander Miller - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (3):407 – 425.
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  5. Mark Johnston’s Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample?Duncan Mcfarland - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C’s application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston’s “missing-explanation argument’ employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are inconsistent. (...)
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  6. Mark Johnston's Substitution Principle: A New Counterexample?Duncan Mcfarland - 1999 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):683-689.
    According to a subjectivist view of some concept, C, there is an a priori implication of subjective responses in C's application or possession conditions. Subjectivists who intend their view to be descriptive of our practice with C will hold that it is possible for there to be true empirical claims which explain such responses in terms of certain things being C. Mark Johnston's "missing-explanation argument" employs a substitution principle with a view to establishing that these strands of subjectivism are inconsistent. (...)
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