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  1. Economic Sanctions and Political Repression: Assessing the Impact of Coercive Diplomacy on Political Freedoms. [REVIEW]Dursun Peksen & A. Cooper Drury - 2009 - Human Rights Review 10 (3):393-411.
    This article offers a thorough analysis of the unintended impact economic sanctions have on political repression—referred to in this study as the level of the government respect for democratic freedoms and human rights. We argue that economic coercion is a counterproductive policy tool that reduces the level of political freedoms in sanctioned countries. Instead of coercing the sanctioned regime into reforming itself, sanctions inadvertently enhance the regime’s coercive capacity and create incentives for the regime’s leadership to commit political repression. Cross-national (...)
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    Economic Globalization and Labor Rights: a Disaggregated Analysis.Dursun Peksen & Jacob M. Pollock - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (3):279-301.
    Does economic globalization create a “race to the bottom” or a “race to the top” in labor rights practices? Despite significant research on the possible impact of economic globalization on labor conditions, little consensus exists as to whether and what forms of economic openness might help or undermine labor rights. In this study, we illustrate the significance of considering the two distinct processes of de facto and de jure globalization. We argue that whereas de facto globalization in the form of (...)
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    Political Effectiveness, Negative Externalities, and the Ethics of Economic Sanctions.Dursun Peksen - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (3):279-289.
    As part of the roundtable “Economic Sanctions and Their Consequences,” this essay discusses whether economic sanctions are morally acceptable policy tools. It notes that both conventional and targeted sanctions not only often fail to achieve their stated objectives but also bring about significant negative externalities in target countries. Economic dislocation and increases in political instability instigated by sanctions disproportionately affect the well-being of opposition groups and marginalized segments of society, while target elites and their support base remain insulated from the (...)
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