Results for 'Dynamical systems'

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  1. A Dynamic Systems Approach to the Development of Cognition and Action.David Morris, E. Thelen & L. B. Smith - 1997 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2).
  2. Dynamic Systems as Tools for Analysing Human Judgement.Joachim Funke - 2001 - Thinking and Reasoning 7 (1):69 – 89.
    With the advent of computers in the experimental labs, dynamic systems have become a new tool for research on problem solving and decision making. A short review of this research is given and the main features of these systems (connectivity and dynamics) are illustrated. To allow systematic approaches to the influential variables in this area, two formal frameworks (linear structural equations and finite state automata) are presented. Besides the formal background, the article sets out how the task demands (...)
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  3. Extending Dynamical Systems Theory to Model Embodied Cognition.Scott Hotton & Jeff Yoshimi - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):444-479.
    We define a mathematical formalism based on the concept of an ‘‘open dynamical system” and show how it can be used to model embodied cognition. This formalism extends classical dynamical systems theory by distinguishing a ‘‘total system’’ (which models an agent in an environment) and an ‘‘agent system’’ (which models an agent by itself), and it includes tools for analyzing the collections of overlapping paths that occur in an embedded agent's state space. To illustrate the way this (...)
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  4.  62
    A Dynamical Systems Perspective on Agent-Environment Interaction.Randall D. Beer - 1995 - Artificial Intelligence 72 (1-2):173-215.
  5.  95
    Dynamical Systems Theory as an Approach to Mental Causation.Tjeerd Van De Laar - 2006 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 37 (2):307-332.
    Dynamical systems theory (DST) is gaining popularity in cognitive science and philosophy of mind. Recently several authors (e.g. J.A.S. Kelso, 1995; A. Juarrero, 1999; F. Varela and E. Thompson, 2001) offered a DST approach to mental causation as an alternative for models of mental causation in the line of Jaegwon Kim (e.g. 1998). They claim that some dynamical systems exhibit a form of global to local determination or downward causation in that the large-scale, global activity of (...)
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  6. Dynamical Systems Theory and Explanatory Indispensability.Juha Saatsi - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):892-904.
    I examine explanations’ realist commitments in relation to dynamical systems theory. First I rebut an ‘explanatory indispensability argument’ for mathematical realism from the explanatory power of phase spaces (Lyon and Colyvan 2007). Then I critically consider a possible way of strengthening the indispensability argument by reference to attractors in dynamical systems theory. The take-home message is that understanding of the modal character of explanations (in dynamical systems theory) can undermine platonist arguments from explanatory indispensability.
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  7.  10
    Dynamical Systems on Monoids. Toward a General Theory of Deterministic Systems and Motion.Marco Giunti & Claudio Mazzola - 2012 - In Gianfranco Minati, Mario Abram & Eliano Pessa (eds.), Methods, Models, Simulations and Approaches towards a General Theory of Change. Singapore: World Scientific. pp. 173-186.
    Dynamical systems are mathematical structures whose aim is to describe the evolution of an arbitrary deterministic system through time, which is typically modeled as (a subset of) the integers or the real numbers. We show that it is possible to generalize the standard notion of a dynamical system, so that its time dimension is only required to possess the algebraic structure of a monoid: first, we endow any dynamical system with an associated graph and, second, we (...)
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  8. Supervenience, Dynamical Systems Theory, and Non-Reductive Physicalism.Jeffrey Yoshimi - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (2):373-398.
    It is often claimed (1) that levels of nature are related by supervenience, and (2) that processes occurring at particular levels of nature should be studied using dynamical systems theory. However, there has been little consideration of how these claims are related. To address the issue, I show how supervenience relations give rise to ‘supervenience functions’, and use these functions to show how dynamical systems at different levels are related to one another. I then use this (...)
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  9. Computers, Dynamical Systems, Phenomena, and the Mind.Marco Giunti - 1992 - Dissertation, Indiana University
    This work addresses a broad range of questions which belong to four fields: computation theory, general philosophy of science, philosophy of cognitive science, and philosophy of mind. Dynamical system theory provides the framework for a unified treatment of these questions. ;The main goal of this dissertation is to propose a new view of the aims and methods of cognitive science--the dynamical approach . According to this view, the object of cognitive science is a particular set of dynamical (...)
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  10.  24
    Micro-Level Affect Dynamics in Psychopathology Viewed From Complex Dynamical System Theory.M. Wichers, J. T. W. Wigman & I. Myin-Germeys - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (4):362-367.
    This article discusses the role of moment-to-moment affect dynamics in mental disorder and aims to integrate recent literature on this topic in the context of complex dynamical system theory. First, we will review the relevance of temporal and contextual aspects of affect dynamics in relation to psychopathology. Related to this, we will discuss recent insights resulting from a network view on affect dynamics in psychopathology. Next, we explore how we can reconcile literature findings from a perspective of complex (...) system theory. Finally, future directions with regard to personalized assessment of risk and diagnostic use are discussed. (shrink)
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  11.  67
    Interpreted Dynamical Systems and Qualitative Laws: From Neural Networks to Evolutionary Systems.Hannes Leitgeb - 2005 - Synthese 146 (1-2):189-202.
    . Interpreted dynamical systems are dynamical systems with an additional interpretation mapping by which propositional formulas are assigned to system states. The dynamics of such systems may be described in terms of qualitative laws for which a satisfaction clause is defined. We show that the systems Cand CL of nonmonotonic logic are adequate with respect to the corresponding description of the classes of interpreted ordered and interpreted hierarchical systems, respectively. Inhibition networks, artificial neural (...)
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  12.  8
    A Dynamic Systems Model of Cognitive and Language Growth.Paul Van Geert - 1991 - Psychological Review 98 (1):3-53.
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  13. Situated Cognition, Dynamic Systems, and Art: On Artistic Creativity and Aesthetic Experience.Ingar Brinck - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):407-431.
    It is argued that the theory of situated cognition together with dynamic systems theory can explain the core of artistic practice and aesthetic experience, and furthermore paves the way for an account of how artist and audience can meet via the artist’s work. The production and consumption of art is an embodied practice, firmly based in perception and action, and supported by features of the local, agent-centered and global, socio-cultural contexts. Artistic creativity and aesthetic experience equally result from the (...)
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  14. A dynamical systems approach to causation.Peter Fazekas, Balázs Gyenis, Gábor Hofer-Szabó & Gergely Kertész - 2019 - Synthese 198 (7):6065-6087.
    Our approach aims at accounting for causal claims in terms of how the physical states of the underlying dynamical system evolve with time. Causal claims assert connections between two sets of physicals states—their truth depends on whether the two sets in question are genuinely connected by time evolution such that physical states from one set evolve with time into the states of the other set. We demonstrate the virtues of our approach by showing how it is able to account (...)
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  15.  7
    A Dynamical Systems Perspective on Flexible Motor Timing.Evan D. Remington, Seth W. Egger, Devika Narain, Jing Wang & Mehrdad Jazayeri - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (10):938-952.
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    Editorial: Dynamic Systems Theory and Embodiment in Psychotherapy Research. A New Look at Process and Outcome.Sergio Salvatore, Wolfgang Tschacher, Omar C. G. Gelo & Sabine C. Koch - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  17.  50
    Impulse Processing: A Dynamical Systems Model of Incremental Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm.Anuenue Kukona & Whitney Tabor - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1009-1051.
    The Visual World Paradigm (VWP) presents listeners with a challenging problem: They must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely (...)
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  18.  29
    Are Dynamical Systems the Answer?Arthur B. Markman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):50-51.
    The proposed model is put forward as a template for the dynamical systems approach to embodied cognition. In order to extend this view to cognitive processing in general, however, two limitations must be overcome. First, it must be demonstrated that sensorimotor coordination of the type evident in the A-not-B error is typical of other aspects of cognition. Second, the explanatory utility of dynamical systems models must be clarified.
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  19.  15
    A Dynamic Systems Model of Basic Developmental Mechanisms: Piaget, Vygotsky, and Beyond.Paul van Geert - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (4):634-677.
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  20. On What Makes Certain Dynamical Systems Cognitive: A Minimally Cognitive Organization Program.Xabier Barandiaran & Alvaro Moreno - 2006 - Adaptive Behavior 14:171-185..
    Dynamicism has provided cognitive science with important tools to understand some aspects of “how cognitive agents work” but the issue of “what makes something cognitive” has not been sufficiently addressed yet, and, we argue, the former will never be complete without the later. Behavioristic characterizations of cognitive properties are criticized in favor of an organizational approach focused on the internal dynamic relationships that constitute cognitive systems. A definition of cognition as adaptive-autonomy in the embodied and situated neurodynamic domain is (...)
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  21.  52
    Complementarity in Classical Dynamical Systems.Harald Atmanspacher - 2006 - Foundations of Physics 36 (2):291-306.
    The concept of complementarity, originally defined for non-commuting observables of quantum systems with states of non-vanishing dispersion, is extended to classical dynamical systems with a partitioned phase space. Interpreting partitions in terms of ensembles of epistemic states (symbols) with corresponding classical observables, it is shown that such observables are complementary to each other with respect to particular partitions unless those partitions are generating. This explains why symbolic descriptions based on an ad hoc partition of an underlying phase (...)
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  22. Bridging Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic Systems Modeling.Marc D. Lewis - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):169-194.
    Efforts to bridge emotion theory with neurobiology can be facilitated by dynamic systems (DS) modeling. DS principles stipulate higher-order wholes emerging from lower-order constituents through bidirectional causal processes cognition relations. I then present a psychological model based on this reconceptualization, identifying trigger, self-amplification, and self-stabilization phases of emotion-appraisal states, leading to consolidating traits. The article goes on to describe neural structures and functions involved in appraisal and emotion, as well as DS mechanisms of integration by which they interact. These (...)
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  23.  31
    A Dynamic Systems View of Habits.Nathaniel F. Barrett - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  24.  9
    Complexly Organised Dynamical Systems.John D. Collier & Clifford A. Hooker - 1999 - Open Systems and Information Dynamics 6 (3):241–302.
    Both natural and engineered systems are fundamentally dynamical in nature: their defining properties are causal, and their functional capacities are causally grounded. Among dynamical systems, an interesting and important sub-class are those that are autonomous, anticipative and adaptive (AAA). Living systems, intelligent systems, sophisticated robots and social systems belong to this class, and the use of these terms has recently spread rapidly through the scientific literature. Central to understanding these dynamical systems (...)
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  25. Development as a Dynamic System.Linda B. Smith & Esther Thelen - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):343-348.
  26.  53
    The Dynamical Systems Accounts for Phenomenology of Immanent Time: An Interpretation by Revisiting a Robotics Synthetic Study.Jun Tani - 2004 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (9):5-24.
    This paper discusses possible correspondences between the dynamical systems characteristics observed in our previously proposed cognitive model and phenomenological accounts of immanent time considered by Edmund Husserl. Our simulation experiments in the anticiparatory learning of a robot showed that encountering sensory-motor flow can be learned as segmented into chunks of reusable primitives with accompanying dynamic shifting between coherences and incoherences in local modules. It is considered that the sense of objective time might appear when the continuous sensory-motor flow (...)
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  27.  69
    Complex Dynamical Systems and the Problems of Identity.Alicia Juarrero - 2002 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 4 (1):94-104.
  28.  22
    Dynamical Systems and Depression: A Framework for Theoretical Perspectives.N. Thomasson & L. Pezard - 1999 - Acta Biotheoretica 47 (3-4):209-218.
    The theory of dynamical systems allows one to describe the change in a system' 's macroscopic behavior as a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics. We show here, from the example of depressive syndrome, the existence of a correspondence between clinical and electro-physiological dimensions and the association between clinical remission and brain dynamics reorganization. On the basis of this experimental study, we discuss the interest of such results concerning the question of normality versus pathology in psychiatry and the relationship (...)
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  29.  58
    Informational Dynamic Systems: Autonomy, Information, Function.Walter Riofrio - 2007 - In Carlos Gershenson, Diederik Aerts & Bruce Edmonds (eds.), Worldviews, Science, and Us: Philosophy and Complexity. World Scientific.
  30.  20
    Making Sense of Dynamic Systems: How Our Understanding of Stocks and Flows Depends on a Global Perspective.Helen Fischer & Cleotilde Gonzalez - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):496-512.
    Stocks and flows are building blocks of dynamic systems: Stocks change through inflows and outflows, such as our bank balance changing with withdrawals and deposits, or atmospheric CO2 with absorptions and emissions. However, people make systematic errors when trying to infer the behavior of dynamic systems, termed SF failure, whose cognitive explanations are yet unknown. We argue that SF failure appears when people focus on specific system elements, rather than on the system structure and gestalt. Using a standard (...)
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  31.  86
    “Homeopathic” Dynamical Systems.Alfred W. Hübler - 2008 - Complexity 13 (3):8-11.
  32.  19
    Dynamic Systems and the “Subsymbolic Level”.Walter J. Freeman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):33-34.
  33. On What Makes Certain Dynamical Systems Cognitive: A Minimally Cognitive Organization Program.Alvaro Moreno - unknown
    Dynamicism has provided cognitive science with important tools to understand some aspects of “how cognitive agents work” but the issue of “what makes something cognitive” has not been sufficiently addressed yet and, we argue, the former will never be complete without the latter. Behavioristic characterizations of cognitive properties are criticized in favor of an organizational approach focused on the internal dynamic relationships that constitute cognitive systems. A definition of cognition as adaptive-autonomy in the embodied and situated neurodynamic domain is (...)
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  34.  2
    Can Dynamical Systems Explain Mental Causation?Ralph D. Ellis - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (3):311-334.
    Dynamical systems promise to elucidate a notion of top–down causation without violating the causal closure of physical events. This approach is particularly useful for the problem of mental causation. Since dynamical systems seek out, appropriate, and replace physical substrata needed to continue their structural pattern, the system is autonomous with respect to its components, yet the components constitute closed causal chains. But how can systems have causal power over their substrates, if each component is sufficiently (...)
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  35. Dynamic and Stochastic Systems as a Framework for Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Science.Christian List & Marcus Pivato - forthcoming - Synthese 198 (3):2551-2612.
    Scientists often think of the world as a dynamical system, a stochastic process, or a generalization of such a system. Prominent examples of systems are the system of planets orbiting the sun or any other classical mechanical system, a hydrogen atom or any other quantum–mechanical system, and the earth’s atmosphere or any other statistical mechanical system. We introduce a general and unified framework for describing such systems and show how it can be used to examine some familiar (...)
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  36.  96
    Cognitive Systems as Dynamic Systems.Terence Horgan & John Tienson - 1992 - Topoi 11 (1):27-43.
  37.  54
    Active Internalism and Open Dynamical Systems.Jeff Yoshimi - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):1 - 24.
    The question whether cognition is subserved by internal processes in the brain (internalism) or extends in to the world (active externalism) has been vigorously debated in recent years. I show how internalist and externalist ideas can be pursued in a common framework, using (1) open dynamical systems, which allow for separate analysis of an agent's intrinsic and embodied dynamics, and (2) supervenience functions, which can be used to study how low-level dynamical systems give rise to higher-level (...)
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  38.  62
    On the Import of Constraints in Complex Dynamical Systems.Cliff Hooker - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (4):757-780.
    Complexity arises from interaction dynamics, but its forms are co-determined by the operative constraints within which the dynamics are expressed. The basic interaction dynamics underlying complex systems is mostly well understood. The formation and operation of constraints is often not, and oftener under appreciated. The attempt to reduce constraints to basic interaction fails in key cases. The overall aim of this paper is to highlight the key role played by constraints in shaping the field of complex systems. Following (...)
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  39.  14
    Dynamical Systems Hypothesis in Cognitive Science.Robert F. Port - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
  40.  16
    A Dynamical System Theory Approach to Cognitive Neuroscience.D. Heinke - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):543-543.
    Neural organization contains a wealth of facts from all areas of brain research and provides a useful overview of physiological data for those working outside the immediate field. Furthermore, it gives a good example that the approach of dynamical system theory together with the concepts of cooperative and competitive interaction can be fruitful for an interdisciplinary approach to cognition.
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  41.  34
    Enacting Musical Emotions. Sense-Making, Dynamic Systems, and the Embodied Mind.Andrea Schiavio, Dylan van der Schyff, Julian Cespedes-Guevara & Mark Reybrouck - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):785-809.
    The subject of musical emotions has emerged only recently as a major area of research. While much work in this area offers fascinating insights to musicological research, assumptions about the nature of emotional experience seem to remain committed to appraisal, representations, and a rule-based or information-processing model of cognition. Over the past three decades alternative ‘embodied’ and ‘enactive’ models of mind have challenged this approach by emphasising the self-organising aspects of cognition, often describing it as an ongoing process of dynamic (...)
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  42.  5
    A Dynamical Systems Perspective on Infant Action and its Development.Eugene C. Goldfield & Peter H. Wolff - 2004 - In Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.), Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell. pp. 1--29.
  43.  38
    Language as a Dynamical System.Jeffrey L. Elman - 1995 - In Tim van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion: Explorations in the Dynamics of Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 195--223.
  44.  54
    Attractor Spaces as Modules: A Semi-Eliminative Reduction of Symbolic AI to Dynamic Systems Theory. [REVIEW]Teed Rockwell - 2004 - Minds and Machines 15 (1):23-55.
    I propose a semi-eliminative reduction of Fodors concept of module to the concept of attractor basin which is used in Cognitive Dynamic Systems Theory (DST). I show how attractor basins perform the same explanatory function as modules in several DST based research program. Attractor basins in some organic dynamic systems have even been able to perform cognitive functions which are equivalent to the If/Then/Else loop in the computer language LISP. I suggest directions for future research programs which could (...)
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  45. Dynamical Systems Theory in Cognition: Are We Really Gaining?Alcibiades Malapi-Nelson - 2002 - Gnosis 6 (1):1-23.
     
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  46.  44
    Towards a Dynamic Systems Approach to Moral Development and Moral Education: A Response to the JME Special Issue, September 2008.Minkang Kim & Derek Sankey - 2009 - Journal of Moral Education 38 (3):283-298.
    Is 'development' a concept that properly belongs to mind and morality and, if it does, what account can we give of moral development now that Piagetian and Kohlbergian models are increasingly being abandoned in developmental psychology? In addressing this central issue, it is hoped that the paper will contribute to the quest for a new integrated model of moral functioning, called for in the September 2008 Special Issue of the Journal of Moral Education (37[3]). Our paper argues that the notion (...)
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  47.  16
    An Enactive and Dynamical Systems Theory Account of Dyadic Relationships.Miriam Kyselo & Wolfgang Tschacher - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  48. The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena Through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self.Stephanie D. Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the context (...)
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  49.  86
    Toward an Interpretation of Dynamic Neural Activity in Terms of Chaotic Dynamical Systems.Ichiro Tsuda - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):793-810.
    Using the concepts of chaotic dynamical systems, we present an interpretation of dynamic neural activity found in cortical and subcortical areas. The discovery of chaotic itinerancy in high-dimensional dynamical systems with and without a noise term has motivated a new interpretation of this dynamic neural activity, cast in terms of the high-dimensional transitory dynamics among “exotic” attractors. This interpretation is quite different from the conventional one, cast in terms of simple behavior on low-dimensional attractors. Skarda and (...)
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  50. Sense-Making and Symmetry-Breaking: Merleau-Ponty, Cognitive Science, and Dynamic Systems Theory.Noah Moss Brender - 2013 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 17 (2):247-273.
    From his earliest work forward, phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty attempted to develop a new ontology of nature that would avoid the antinomies of realism and idealism by showing that nature has its own intrinsic sense which is prior to reflection. The key to this new ontology was the concept of form, which he appropriated from Gestalt psychology. However, Merleau-Ponty struggled to give a positive characterization of the phenomenon of form which would clarify its ontological status. Evan Thompson has recently taken up (...)
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