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  1.  11
    Resolved Feet in the Trimeters of Euripides and the Chronology of the Plays.E. B. Ceadel - 1941 - Classical Quarterly 35 (1-2):66-.
    The regular increase in the proportion of resolved feet in the iambic trimeters of Euripides' later plays was first commented upon in 1807 by J. Gottfried Hermann, who therefrom deduced the principle that the date of any play of Euripides could be directly determined from the frequency of its resolutions. This criterion he restated in several of his works in the following years, and when Elmsley objected that it was of uncertain value on account of the small number of plays (...)
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  2.  7
    The Division of Parts Among the Actors in Sophocles' Oedipus Coloneus.E. B. Ceadel - 1941 - Classical Quarterly 35 (3-4):139-.
    The distribution of the parts among the actors in the O.C. is a problem that has long defied solution. In all the other extant plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides the dramatis personae can without difficulty be divided between three actors: but the construction of the O.C. is so complex that it does not admit any such simple allocation. When the part of Oedipus has been assigned to the first actor, and that of Antigone to the second, the roles of (...)
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  3.  34
    M. Tanaka: Plato, Apologia Socratis, Editio Altera. Pp. Xvi + 180. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1974. Paper, 1,800 Yen.E. B. Ceadel - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (01):125-.
  4.  7
    M. Tanaka: Plato, Apologia Socratis, Editio Altera. Pp. Xvi + 180. Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1974. Paper, 1,800 Yen.E. B. Ceadel - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):125-125.
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  5.  12
    The 'Askew Collations' of Aeschylus.E. B. Ceadel - 1940 - Classical Quarterly 34 (1-2):55-.
    Nearly every edition of Aeschylus published between 1782 and 1852 contained readings from what were called ‘Askew's collations’ or the ‘Askew MSS.’—usually referred to as Ask. A, Ask. B, Ask. C, Ask. D, Ask. a, Colb. 1, and Colb. 2. These MSS., which were very briefly described, were stated in these editions to be Paris MSS. which had been collated by Askew. Blomfield, however, discovered that Askew had transcribed all the collations from a note-book that had belonged to Needham, and (...)
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